‘Juxtapozed” and ‘Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics’ Opens at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art

Juxtapozed and Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics! opened on April 21st at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art welcoming over 600 art enthusiasts through its doors. The exhibitions showcasing the New Contemporary Art movement and legendary godfather of the low brow and pop surrealist art movement, Robert Williams, was the first of its kind in the midwest. The show attracted guest from all over the midwest and east coast who drove in to be at the opening. The cities mentioned include Detroit, Kalamazoo, Grand Rapids, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Indianapolis, and Pittsburgh to name a few. The following day Robert Williams discussed the basics of his work and process while always being considered an outsider in the art world.

Artists,  Laurence Vallieres, Cinta Vidal, Kazu, and Meggs were on hand at the opening for Juxtapozed. The museum even picked up pieces by Megs and Cinta Vidal for their permanent collection to commemorate the shows on site murals.

For more information on Juxtapozed and to view the available pieces from the exhibition, please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.  The full press release for Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics can be viewed here.

Both exhibitions are on view now through July 9th.

Interview with Seth Armstrong for “Pretty Deep Shit”

Thinkspace is proud to present Seth Armstrong’s latest body of work ‘Pretty Deep Shitin our main room. Armstrong, a Los Angeles native, and based artist uses oil paints to capture the paused observation, catching a scene one might not be meant to be a witness.  In anticipation of Armstrong’s upcoming exhibition with us, we have an exclusive interview with Seth Armstrong to discuss his feelings about Los Angeles, a day in the studio, and how he pushes him to grow as an artist.

Pretty Deep Shit’s opening reception is from 6 – 9 pm this coming Saturday, April 29th in our main room

SH: What inspired your latest body of work?
SA: My personal life, basically. I’m looking at the artwork right now and it’s a map of where I spend my time and people I know. I can think it’s more complicated than that when I’m doing it, but sitting here now when it’s done, that’s how it looks.

SH: What is your favorite and least favorite part of LA? What do you think is the most overrated & underrated aspects of living in Los Angeles?
SA: I love the weather, I love the proximity to the ocean, I love my backyard, my parent’s backyard, backyards in general. My least favorite thing is the fact that I only see my friends on the Westside once a year.

SH: Do you imagine the people within your painting have connected story lines? Or are the all independent from each other?
SA: I like to think that they’re all related.

SH: How do you challenge yourself to grow and progress as an artist?
SA: I try not to paint the same thing too often. I feel like there are some aesthetic qualities that my paintings share, of course, but I don’t want to have a gimmick.

SH: What are your three favorite colors?
SA: Red, Yellow, and Blue.

SH: If you were to collaborate with any artists dead or alive, who would it be and why?
SA: Does Ben Franklin count as an artist? David Hockney, Edward Hopper, and Ben Franklin.

SH: What do you enjoy using oils over other mediums?
SA: I like their unpredictability. I never know quite what I’m gonna get, which is challenging and fun.

SH: Can you walk us through what a day in the studio might look like?
SA: My dog wakes me up by dropping toys on my face. I take her somewhere and get coffee. I come home, eat breakfast, answer emails and bullshit. Hopefully, by 11 or noon I’m painting. I paint until dinner time, take a break for an hour or two, then I’m back in the studio for another few hours at least.

SH: What excites you about other artists work?
SA: I like seeing the process within the finished piece. I like seeing the evidence of the work put in. And I like texture.

SH: If you work was translated into a cocktail what would it be made out of and taste like?
SA: Half coffee, half beer.

Interview with Brian Mashburn for ‘Axiom’

Thinkspace is proud to present Brian Mashburn‘s latest body of work ‘Axiomin our project room. Mashburn, an Ashville-based artist, creates detailed oils painting of smoky landscapes where nature finds it way to prevail amongst a desolate industrialized world.  In anticipation of Mashburn’s upcoming exhibition with us, we have an exclusive interview with Brian Mashburn to discuss his creative process, a day in the studio, and a perfect day in Asheville.

Axioms opening reception is from 6 – 9 pm this coming Saturday, April 29th in our main room

SH: What was the inspiration behind this latest body of work?
BM: For the most part it’s in response to our ongoing political situation and various other social and environmental concerns.

SH: The mountains seem to be more looming and ominous compared to past work, is this a progression or our projection?
BM: Maybe a little of both. I’m pretty fond of traditional Chinese landscape painting, earlier works from the Song and Yuan dynasties in particular. Some of the recent thematic and compositional cues have certainly come from that influence, which includes more prominent mountains. Personally, I don’t see them as necessarily ominous or looming but I understand how they could read as such. For me, the mountains represent either an ideal place or state of mind or serve as an anchor for the composition providing stability and/or depth to the picture.

SH: How do you challenge yourself to grow and evolve as an artist?
BM: I try to stay engaged and curious, earnest and when possible not cynical. I do my best to educate myself on a wide variety of topics both technically and conceptually tangential to my work.

SH: What is your creative process? How much does the outside world influence your work and voice?
BM: Quite a bit, there is a ubiquity about the news these days that is sort of unavoidable and painting can be a good way to process things, a kind of catharsis for sure. For example, the painting called “Great Leap Forward” began as a response to Trump’s proposed border wall and other antics from this administration. It got me thinking about examples from history in which a brutish solution failed to address a nuanced problem. The historic Great Leap Forward was Mao Zedong’s campaign to force China from an agrarian economy to an industrial one. A particularly insidious part was the mandate to kill all Eurasian tree sparrows and rats in China in an effort to boost grain production for export. I guess the thinking was the fewer grain-eating sparrows there were the larger the harvest and subsequent export business would be. The plan failed but not before creating an ecological catastrophe that greatly exacerbated the Great Chinese Famine. Scattered throughout the painting are several references to Mao’s rise to power and looking on are 3 tree sparrows and a rat.

SH: Can you walk us through what a day in the studio looks like?
BM: I wake up around 6 or 7 most days then have my coffee and read until 8 or 9. The rest of the morning I try and focus on the things that are either more difficult or less appealing, things that I will dread doing until I get them out of the way. The afternoon usually finds me down some rabbit hole either in a painting or doing research. I’ll take an occasional break to play with the dog or go for a walk. I try and finish up around 8.

SH: What do you enjoy doing when not painting? What would be a perfect day in Asheville?
BM: I like to hike. I also watch birds. Asheville is a great town for both. There is a scenic route called the Blue Ridge Parkway nearby, it’s sort of like our version of the PCH. It closes in the winter whenever there is snow or ice. On those days I try and get up to the parkway early in the morning and walk the closed road. Those are pretty ideal days in Asheville.

SH: If you were to collaborate with any artists dead or alive, who would it be and why?
BM: It would be cool to work on a mural with Thomas Hart Benton, I think our approaches would be similar and I would learn a great deal.

SH: What excites you about other artists work?
BM: That’s hard to say, I appreciate nuance, integrity, and technical proficiency but those things may or may not generate excitement. There is something about the immediacy of visual art that produces a sensory experience separate from critical thinking.

SH: Are you a binge-watcher/listener? If so, what’s been your latest addition?
BM: Yes, I listen to podcasts and audiobooks compulsively. I binged S-Town twice the first week it came out and recently ran across The Atlantic’s feed on Soundcloud. Recent audiobooks include Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari, Them by Jon Ronson, and The Better Angels of our Nature by Steven Pinker.

SH: If your work was translated into a cocktail what would it be made out of and taste like?
BM: Bourbon, neat.

 

Marco Mazzoni’s ‘Mirta and her Pawsome Friend’ Kickstarter Project

Thinkspace Family artist Marco Mazzoni has launched a new project to honor his best friend who passed away a few weeks before his show with us back in March, his dog. The project, which is currently accepting donations through Kickstarter, is a hardcover book that will include 30 illustrations by Mazzoni telling the story of a little girl, Mirta, her dog King and the special bond between them.  You can support Mazzoni by visiting his Kickstarter and checking out the various rewards he is offering to backers. For $300, you can get an original drawing of your furry friend, but don’t delay he is only taking on 15 more backers for that reward.

Thinkspace Family really understands the loss of a furry friend as a few of us at the gallery have also lost some of our pets within the past year, and applaud Marco’s for channeling his love for his companion into this beautiful story.

Learn more about the project here.

To view all available artwork by Marco Mazzoni, please click here.

 

Supersonic Preview of ‘JUXTAPOZED’ at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art

Thank you to Supersonic Art for posting a preview of “JUXTAPOZED” at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art. The exhibition opens April 21st alongside Robert William’s ‘SLANG! Aesthetics‘. To view Supersonic’s favorite pieces from the show hop on over to their site. You can view the full preview of the exhibition now on  Thinkspace Gallery’s website.

‘JUXTAPOZED’ on Juxtapoz

It’s like art world inception as Juxtapoz Magazine posted a preview of the upcoming “JUXTAPOZED” exhibition at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art.  The exhibition is inspired by the New Contemporary Art movement and its influence on Juxtapoz magazine. The exhibition opens April 22nd in conjunction with  Robert Williams’ “SLANG Aesthetics!”, to view more information on the show visit Thinkspace Gallery’s website.

Juxtapozed, a show title drawn from the magazine of the same name in the imperative tense, celebrates the legacy made possible by Juxtapoz Magazine. The access the publication has facilitated since the early “90s to a widely cast variety of media and expressions has shaped the movement itself and preserved its continued relevance.

Arrested Motion previews “JUXTAPOZED” at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art

Thank you to Arrested Motion for posting a preview of the upcoming “Juxtapozed” exhibition opening this weekend at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art. Arrested Motion shared several of their favorite pieces from the show in anticipation of the opening April 21st. Juxtapozed celebrates Juxtapoz Magazine’s impact on this genre is curated by Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace Gallery, Gary Pressman of Copro Gallery, and Adjunct Curator of the museum, Josef Zimmerman.