Juxtapozed and Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics Opening at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art April 2017

Opening April 21, 2017, at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art are Juxtapozed and Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics!, co-curated by Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace Gallery, Gary Pressman of Copro Gallery, and Adjunct Curator of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Josef Zimmerman. The second installment of exhibitions Los Angeles’ Thinkspace Gallery has brought to the Museum to date, following the success of Invisible College from 2015, both showcase new and exciting work from the steadily expanding New Contemporary Art Movement. A continuation of Thinkspace’s mutually reinforced mission to garner institutional exposure and recognition for New Contemporary Art, its history, founders, key players, and artists, the exhibitions celebrate the impact of its most enduring media platforms, Juxtapoz Magazine, and the work of one of its most iconic trailblazers. Now widely considered the largest and longest running art movement in history, the New Contemporary Art Movement encompasses everything from Street Art and Muralism to Pop Surrealism and Hyperrealism.

The New Contemporary Art Movement has been largely self-sustained through a network of alternative cultural platforms, primarily outside of the mainstream and institutionally vetted art markets, including social media, blogs, zines, underground collectives, galleries, and urban and alternative spaces. Copro and Thinkspace galleries in Los Angeles are two of the movement’s most visible and active proponents, taking the work to art fairs, collaborating with galleries internationally, and opening institutional channels for its exhibition and appreciation. Boasting 400,000 followers through its various social media outlets, Thinkspace has helped to bring the work to a wider international audience. As the movement continues to expand on a global scale, its diversity, inclusivity, and vitality set it apart from more exclusionary art world models.

Co-founder and Curator of Thinkspace Gallery, Andrew Hosner, says, “Our plan is to continue to knock on the door of the establishment until more listen, more take notice, more start to add these artists to their permanent collections, and start to give the movement the attention it has earned and deserved.”

Juxtapozed, a show title drawn from the magazine of the same name in the imperative tense, celebrates the legacy made possible by Juxtapoz. The access the publication has facilitated since the early 90s to a widely cast variety of media and expressions, has shaped the movement itself and preserved its continued relevance. Founded in San Francisco in 1994 by Robert Williams, Craig Stecyk, Greg Escalante, Eric Swenson and Fausto Vitello, Juxtapoz evolved from the intent to foster and support the art and culture of the underground. The magazine provided an alternative voice and narrative as a counterpart to the dominant New York-centric discourse of contemporary art and featured artists who straddled the boundaries between “high” and “low” culture. Aligning itself with the aesthetics of contemporary street culture, figurative art, California car culture, gig posters, tattoos, graphics, psychedelia, and comics, the publication became a conduit and forum for an entirely new generation of artists who were latching on to a populist visual vernacular.

Juxtapozed features an installation by Laurence Vallieres and murals by Cinta Vidal & Bumblebeelovesyou. The group exhibition features individual works by 48 New Contemporary artists, including 1010, Aaron Nagel, Alex Garant, Allison Sommers, Amy Sol, Bec Winnel, Benjamin Garcia, Brian M. Viveros, Chris Mars, Cinta Vidal, Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker, Daniel Bilodeau, David Rice, Derek Gores, Dulk, Erik Siador, Erika Sanada, Fernando Chamarelli, Frank Gonzales, Fuco Ueda, Ian Francis, Jeff Gilette, Joe Sorren, Joel, Daniel Phillips, Jolene Lai, Jon Swihart, Josh Keyes, Juan Travieso, Kazu, Kelly Vivanco, Kikyz1313, Lauren Brevner, Liz Brizzi, Mark Ryden, Martin Whatson, Martin Wittfooth, Mary Iverson, Mike
Davis, Meggs, Ron English, Sepe, Sergio Garcia, Shag, Shepard Fairey, Stephanie Buer, Telmo Miel, Travis Louie, Wiley Wallace, and Yosuke Ueno.

‘JUXTAPOZED’
Curated by Andrew and Shawn Hosner with Gary Pressman & Josef Zimmerman

Opening Reception:
Friday, April 21st 7-10PM

On View: April 22nd – July 9th, 2017

Taking Place At:
Fort Wayne Museum of Art
311 E. Main Street
Fort Wayne, IN 46802

Featuring murals and installations from:
Bumblebeelovesyou – Cinta Vidal – Icy and Sot – Laurence Vallieres

Alongside a group show featuring works from:
1010
Aaron Nagel
Alex Garant
Allison Sommers
Amy Sol
Bec Winnel
Benjamin Garcia
Brian Viveros
Chris Mars
Cinta Vidal
Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker
Daniel Bilodeau
David Rice
Derek Gores
Dulk
Erik Siador
Erika Sanada
Fernando Chamarelli
Frank Gonzales
Fuco Ueda
Ian Francis
Jason Seife
Jeff Gillette
Joe Sorren
Joel Daniel Phillips
Jolene Lai
Jon Swihart
Josh Keyes
Juan Travieso
Kazu
Kelly VIvanco
Kikyz1313
Lauren Brevner
Liz Brizzi
Mark Ryden
Martin Whatson
Martin Wittfooth
Mary Iverson
Meggs
Mike Davis
Ron English
Scott Listfield
Sepe
Sergio Garcia
Shag
Shepard Fairey
Stephanie Buer
Telmo Miel
Travis Louie
Wiley Wallace
Yosuke Ueno

Thinkspace Gallery
www.thinkspacegallery.com
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Copro Gallery
www.coprogallery.com
IG icon @coprogallery

FWMoA
www.fwmoa.org
IG icon @fwmoa

Interview with Marco Mazzoni for “Dear Collapse”

Thinkspace is proud to present Marco Mazzoni’s latest body of work ‘Dear Collapse’ which will include a complete Moleskin sketchbook in our main room coming this Saturday, March 4th. This will be Italian artist Mazzoni’s second solo exhibition with us showing his phenomenal pencil drawings that have the dense opacity and immersive depth of paintings. In anticipation of Mazzoni’s upcoming exhibition with us, we have an exclusive interview with Marco Mazzoni to discuss his technique, source of inspiration, and an inspired cocktail recipe.

Join us for the opening of “Dear Collapse” Saturday, March 4th from 6 -9pm. 

SH: What ideas and themes were you exploring in this latest body of work?
MM: First of all, the title of this show is inspired by a chat I had with the famous Italian songwriter Vasco Brondi, best known as “Le Luci della Centrale Elettrica” (who spent with me some of his precious time although he is currently very busy with the release of his new album) !!

“Dear Collapse” comes from a few health problems I have been dealing with throughout this year. Such situation allowed me to reconsider many aspects of my relationship with society. This theme is clearly shown by many of the drawings titles (“Regret”, “Insecurity”, “Compassion”, “A Secret”) and by the Moleskine sketchbook on show, which has been my faithful companion throughout all the waiting times.

SH: Your technique with colored pencils has been able to translate the density of paint and yet a texture like velvet. There are many trials and errors throughout an artist’s journey, but how did you develop this unique artistic style? Did you have a mentor? Formal training with pencils?
MM: The use of colored pencils actually depends on my incapacity to use with effectiveness liquid materials such as acrylics or oils.
For sure my love for such medium has its roots from my encounter with the artist Gianluigi Rocca, a draughtsman (and shepherd!) who dedicated all of his life to drawings of Still Life mainly with graphite.
In order to achieve a velvet-like quality in my drawings, I studied the 16th-century technique of chiaroscuro (to be clear, the same technique used by Ribera and Rembrandt). The final result consists in multiple glazes of pencils, in layers.

SH: What do you feel can be achieved with pencils, that is limited in paint?
MM: Surely a blunter quality of mark and a sensation of overall uniformity due to the specific size of the tip of the pencils.

SH: What was the most challenging piece in the current body of work? Which piece is most personal to you?
MM: If we don’t consider the Moleskine sketchbook (which is definitely the most personal and time-demanding work I have ever done), I would say that the most challenging and representative piece in the current body of work is “Madre” (in English “Mother”), one of my very few drawings featuring an entire face. In this piece, you can see that the tear from the eye of the subject actually becomes the subject’s viscera. This is to say that the Mother is the one who gives birth to an organism, thus forming a bond with her creature that will last until the end of her life.

SH: If your body of work inspired a cocktail? What would it be made out of and taste like?
MM: It would be definitely inspired by an Italian cocktail named “Sbagliato”, 1/3 sparkling wine, 1/3 Campari, 1/3 Vermouth. Sweet and nice to look at, but heavy on your stomach!

SH: In this exhibition complete sketchbooks will be available for collectors, what made you decide to release your sketchbooks?
MM: The making of this sketchbook went hand in hand with the preparation of the show. Inside it, you can see how I studied palettes and ideas. Most of the portraits included, feature people I have seen throughout this year while traveling in the underground or outside the studio, people I know (my mother, my father, my fiancèe, friends), and two writers (Don DeLillo and Paul Auster) whose books I have been re-reading during the preparation of the show.
I chose to release this sketchbook in order to make the show more complete. In fact, whereas the other pieces have been thought and finished inside the studio, the sketchbook has been made mainly outside the studio. Finally, my idea was that of putting together an exhibition capable of showing both sides of the overall work.

SH: What is your creative process? Can you walk us through a day in the studio?
MM: The idea for a piece usually comes from books or from something that hits me about important artists of the past. Some of the works in this show are inspired by my latest passion for sculptors (Medardo Rosso and Adolfo Wildt for example).
My typical day in the studio can be resumed in a few simple steps: wake up, coffee, draw, eat, draw, cook, eat, sleep.

SH: How do you push through moments of creative dry spells? What is the best advice you’ve received as an artist?
MM: Each time I have a dry-spell I usually take a walk outside with my fiancée as she is the one to sense when I am having a block and drags me out of the studio first.
It’s quite hard for me to accept advice from others because I tend to take the whole responsibility on my shoulders for whatever I am doing so that I can be the only one to blame if something goes wrong (or to praise if something goes right).

SH: What elements in other artists’ work inspire you? Who are a few of your favorite artists right now?
MM: Some of the artists of the past I love the most are the aforementioned sculptors Medardo Rosso and Adolfo Wildt, and the Italian draughtsman Renzo Vespignani.
The contemporary artists I admire the most are Audrey Kawasaki, Aaron Horkey, Yoshitomo Nara, Esao Andrews, Federico Solmi, my friend Agostino Arrivabene, Anton Vill and many more I surely love but at the moment I can’t remember.
Although what really really got me deeply touched is a dance by Nosego I had the lucky chance to see on his Instagram a little while ago!

SH: What are three of your favorite places in Milan?
MM: The house of my friends Stefano and Chiara, where my fiancèe and I have the chance to eat something new and exotic every time!
“Fondazione Prada,” a contemporary art museum, a few step away from my studio.
“Circolo Magnolia”, a place where I often go to see concerts of my favorite bands.

Coming to the Thinkspace Gallery Office this March – Alvaro Naddeo

We’re excited to announce artist Alvaro Naddeo will be showing his work in the Thinkspace Gallery ‘office’ coming this March.

Alvaro Naddeo is from São Paulo, Brazil and 15 years ago he started to move around as he searched for his path in life. First he found himself living in Lima, Peru then making the big move to New York City, followed by a short stint in Tampa, ultimately landing in Los Angeles where he currently lives and creates. All of these varying urban environments helped to shape his memory and inform his work. From an early age he fell in love with painting, watching his father who is a renowned illustrator work. Due to a lack of self-confidence, Naddeo pushed his brush aside and pursued a career in advertising as an Art Director. Twenty years later, while living in New York City and being exposed to its many contrasts, his desire to pick up his brushes was rejuvenated and he came back to painting with a focused intensity and a newfound confidence. The subject matter of his work is waste, overconsumption and social inequality. The brands, logos and packaging depicted in his work are objects with an inherent duality, both desirable and despicable, a clear byproduct of having worked in consumer advertising for all those years. We here at Thinkspace are excited to see where his work takes him and to be able to help give it an audience.

Scott Listfield Interviewed in Art Maze Mag

Thinkspace Family artist Scott Listfield was recently interviewed in Art Maze Mag discussing astronauts, isolation, and his artistic wisdom.  We still have a few pieces from Scott Listfield’s well-received solo presentation in the Vault Gallery at the Lancaster Museum of Art and History that are available on the  Thinkspace Gallery website.

Jump over to Art Maze Mag’s website for the full interview.

AMM: What influences outside the visual arts inspire and impact your approach to making work?

SL: Oh lots of things. I think there’s a ton of amazing art happening right now, but I’d say that most of my influences come from elsewhere. Books and movies, particularly science fiction. Cartoons, both contemporary and the ones I watched growing up. I listen to a lot of music in the studio which sometimes sets the tone for what I’m working on. I also like to get out and walk around when I can, especially places far from home. Seeing new things gets me back in the mind set of my astronaut.

POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Art Movement: Part IV Exhibition featured on Arrested Motion

arrested motion

Thank you to Arrested Motion for covering Exploring The New Contemporary Art Movement: Part IV exhibition.  Jump over to Arrested Motion’s website to explore the exhibition and view all available work from the show on the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Artists were asked to contribute 12 x 12″ pieces leading to a visually conforming display of works. Rounding things out was a showcase for Shok-1 (seen below) and a Homer Simpson x Banksy parody installation by Oak Oak (seen above). – Arrested Motion

Coming in March – Marco Mazonni’s ‘Dear Collapse’

Marco Mazzoni
Dear Collapse
March 4, 2017 – March 25, 2017

We are  pleased to present its second solo exhibition of new works by Italian artist Marco Mazzoni in Dear Collapse. Mazzoni’s phenomenal drawings have the dense opacity and immersive depth of paintings. He achieves this quality of detail and rich tonality, more commonly associated with wet media, through dry, converting traditional old masters’ painting techniques to pencil. These emphasize dramatic uses of light and contrast, like chiaroscuro and tenebrism, to create dramatic extremes and pitches. The density and richness of his works on paper belie the simplicity of their materiality; though seemingly plush and heavy with wet pigment, they are entirely rendered in Faber Castells. Originally from Tortona in Northern Italy and now based in Milan, Mazzoni is known all over the world for his hauntingly beautiful images of women partially obscured by a hallucinogenic flood of flora and fauna. Caught somewhere between the swell of an eruption and the depletion of devouring, the faces Mazzoni reveals from beneath their burden of petals, leaves, and wings seem to bloom and corrode, as though possessed by a manic biology.

Inspired by ancient Sardinian folklore and its traditions of oral storytelling, Mazzoni is fascinated by the history of its matriarchal culture, and the central role women played as herbalists and healers in the 16th to 18th centuries. These women were objects of both admiration and dread, occupying a position of proximity to the great mysteries of life and death as both midwives and shamans; agented in the rituals of birth and dying. Myths grew from these powerful matriarchies and verbally recounted stories of darkly worlds had women as its subjects and arbiters. Prominent in Sardinian myth are Janas and Cogas, female figures deeply connected to nature who were either enchanted menders or seductive, curse-wielding, witches. Mazzoni’s works capture the ambiguity of these ancient harbingers of feminine power – galvanized as emotional extremes in his works. They appear as beautiful and seductive at times, or as vaguely ominous and morbid at others.

The artist’s technique involves the application of several meticulous layers of color pencil, much like the under paintings used in wet media, and “glazes” or final veils of color are applied as a finishing step to unify the pigment and visual tone of the works. Sketches have always been an integral aspect of the artist’s practice; the preliminary space in which he resolves his compositions and develops concepts and technique. Dear Collapse will include one of Mazzoni’s complete sketchbooks, available through the gallery for the first time, which will be filmed in its entirety by Thinkspace.

Mazzoni’s imagery conveys a heavy sensuality. Faces remain unspecific and anonymous, eyes are seldom revealed, either masked or left as expanses of negative space. The figurative component of his work functions almost as a vessel from which the flowers, plants, and butterflies burst. Seeping from mouths and consuming skins, the plants and flowers – direct references to the ancient traditions of herbal healing and psychoactive poisons – are inextricably merged with bodies. It is always somewhat unclear as to whether the growth comes from within or without, whether the body is the agent or the victim of its consumption. The works are also undeniably erotic, magnetized, suggesting something of the ambivalent coexistence of human desire and repulsion – frenzied bedfellows like beauty and disgust, vitality and rot, life and death – these figures, eerily more than human, are uncomfortably necromanced and bloated with strange, beautiful life.

Coming In March – Atsuko Goto’s ‘The Silence of Idols’

Atsuko Goto
The Silence of Idols
March 4, 2017 – March 25, 2017

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room are new works by emerging Japanese artist Atsuko Goto; The Silence of Idols is the artist’s first solo project with the gallery. A graduate of the Tokyo University of the Arts, Goto also studied at the National School of Fine Arts in Paris.

The artist creates beautifully melancholic images of delicate figures cloaked and merged with natural elements, everything from flowers and butterflies to insects, birds, and fish. Her muted palette is as ghostly as haze, achieved through the unique application of diluted pigments made from semi-precious lapis lazuli, ink, and gum arabic applied to cotton.

Inspired by Japanese Shinto and the belief that nature is animated by divinity and sacred spirits harbored in every living and inanimate thing, Goto creates imagery that conveys this feeling of profuse life force and intangible mystery, offset by a darker suggestion of mourning and lament. Quietly meditative, her works exude a dreamlike calm and resignation despite their abundance of detail and the density of her compositions. Silence and forlorn composure define this existence of the preternatural.

Fragile in their tempered darkness, the works are subtle and near translucent – like the unknown light and strange optics of an otherworldly plane where everything is unsubstantial. A feeling of entrapment and isolation persists, however, in the quietude. Like hauntings from the subconscious, the paintings feel like faded dreams, surreal distortions bordering on the ominous. Unsettling, the muted beauty of these diaphanous idols loom, uncannily caught in a thin veil between worlds.