DULK Print Drop Tomorrow, May 26th

We’re excited to announce Thinkspace Gallery will be publishing our first fine art print from DULK. This special edition is of ‘The Threat’ that was featured in our recent ‘NEXUS‘ exhibition at the Brand Library & Art Center in Glendale, California. Printed by the good folks at Static Medium, this edition came out just beautifully and will be available this coming Friday morning.

DULK

‘The Threat’
Edition of 30
12×20 inches / 30.4×50.8cm
Signed and numbered by the artist
$100 each

Please note there are no pre-orders or holds available. Our web shop only accepts payment via PayPal currently, so please make sure your address is confirmed there. Prints will ship from our offsite warehouse, so please note in-person pickup is not an option. All prints will ship out within a week of being ordered and tracking will be shared to your PayPal account. Thank you.
Available at 10AM Pacific Time this coming Friday, May 26 at:

Casey Weldon’s “Sentimental Deprivation” Opening Saturday, June 3rd.

 

Casey Weldon
Sentimental Deprivation
June 3 – June 24, 2017

Thinkspace Gallery is pleased to present new works by Casey Weldon in Sentimental Deprivation. Born in Southern California, Weldon attended Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and is now based out of Washington, D.C. by way of Las Vegas, New York, and Portland. His surreal paintings combine elements of humor, nostalgia, and the absurd to stage open-ended narratives, and lush imaginary views, that border on the hyperchromatic edges of psychedelia. From optically disorienting four-eyed kittens and seemingly phosphorescent girls to giant disproportionately scaled Chihuahuas in desert canyon landscapes, nothing is too weirdly outré or unimaginable for Weldon’s visual fictions.
Unrestricted by the prohibitive constraints of probability, Weldon’s imagination playfully borrows imagery and kitsch from popular culture – past and present – and recombines its familiar fragments into beautifully strange reconstitutions.

Weldon gambols with the manipulation of scale and contrast to create otherworldly scenes, as though pulled from the cavities of the unconscious and its latent thread-like associations. The works alternate between moments of intense darkness and incandescent light, figuratively and literally. Saturated with lush color and detail, they are stylized by idiosyncratic palette choices that capture a range of brightness and atmosphere, from the intensity of neon to the lambent of dusk and the recesses of twilight obscurity. The unexpected is always at play in the subject matter, as unlikely pairings, exaggerated spatial relationships, and incongruous contexts offer infinite possible realities and suggestive collusions. The world, delivered through the lens of Weldon’s imagination, is distorted on a hyperbolic visual plane, where the mythic proportions of incidental symbolism are laid open to the willing. Weldon creates works with hooks rather than imperatives, providing an openness to interpretation for the viewer rather than a prescriptive demand to be read.

Inspired by the early twentieth century surrealists André Breton and Giorgio de Chirico, Weldon uses similar creative strategies like juxtaposition and stream of consciousness, filtered through a contemporary sensibility, to defamiliarize the familiar and problematize the seemingly innocuous elements of the day to day. Charged with a range of affect that taps into everything from the playful and irreverent to the uncanny and melancholic, his works are beautifully disruptive and galvanized by the unpredictable. Technically, the paintings, though illustrative in style, combine moments of highly-detailed representational realism offset by stylistically surreal interjections. Recurring themes include the exploration of humankind’s tenuous interaction with and coexistence within nature – especially impactful in our era of environmental depletion – and the generative possibilities of extreme displacement and exaggerated context.

Kisung Koh’s ‘Long Live the Polar Treasure’ Opening Saturday, June 3rd.

Kisung Koh
Long Live the Polar Treasure
June 3 – June 24, 2017

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room is Long Live the Polar Treasure, featuring new works by South Korean, Toronto-based artist Kisung Koh. Koh’s first solo exhibition with the gallery is dedicated entirely to the majestic and endangered polar bear. The artist’s fascination and love for wildlife are evident in much of his practice. Exploring the spiritual potential of the wild and its stoic inhabitants, Koh draws analogous connections between animal and human plights.

With its Arctic habitat seriously depleted and at risk given the onslaught of global warming and climate change, the polar bear’s existence and longevity as a species are no longer secure. Koh has used this body of work as an ode to the ongoing displacement and compromise due to the destruction of the bear’s environment. Drawing personal parallels with his own life, Koh identifies with the difficulties of deracination and the pangs of dislocated belonging.

Working in oil on panel, Koh creates beautifully detailed works, dreamlike in their atmospheric execution and dramatic in their contrasts between light and dark. Hyperreal depictions of these animals seem to emerge from soft hazy atmospheres or blackened darkness. Depicted in varying states of rest, in verdant landscapes to which they don’t belong, the works are beautiful but heavy with an ominous suggestion of sadness.

Opening Reception of “Flourish” at the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum

Last weekend FLOURISH  at Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum curated by Thinkspace Gallery opened to a positive reception. We’d like to thank all that came to the exhibition from all over Arizona and beyond to support the opening night. We were so thrilled to see over 1,200 art lovers come through the doors of the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum in the beautiful Mesa Arts Center located in the heart of downtown Mesa, Arizona.

The site-specific ephemeral murals from Esao Andrews and Nosego along with the site-specific installation from Felipe Pantone are reason enough to visit, if not for the incredible group show featuring close to 100 artists from around the globe. A great introduction to the burgeoning New Contemporary Art Movement for those new to this scene and an incredible survey of some of the hottest artists out there for those that are in the know and already familiar. This landmark exhibition remains on view through August 6th, so please be sure to pay it a visit this summer.

For more information on the exhibition and to view the available pieces from the show visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.

more photos after the jump

Continue reading Opening Reception of “Flourish” at the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum

Two Stories Left from Jacub Gagnon’s “Short Stories”

If we referred to Jacob Gagnon’s work from “Short Stories” as stories themselves, then there would only be two left to read. A nearly sold out exhibition, Gagnon’s work is filled with whimsical narratives of compositional wordplay and at times translating the real world into the unreal at the delight of collectors.  Below are a few words from Jacub Gagnon regarding the available works from Short Stories.

“Polar Flare”
The flare is struck, the roar of its signal matched only by the bear’s cry for help.  The Polar Bear’s habitat is vanishing; the sea ice is melting, and as a result of the changing ecosystem the current status of the Polar Bear is vulnerable.  With this painting, I tried to express both the emotion and urgency of this situation. I want the viewer to hear the call and I want it to elicit a strong discourse.  Furthermore, I believe this painting to be a symbol to spark change.

“The Belly of the Beast”
Based on the concept of a Matryoshka doll (Russian nesting doll), I tried to represent a natural food-chain with each respective predator’s prey in its belly.  I’ve taken some liberties in doing so but enjoyed “stacking” these mammals one inside another.  The title can be interrupted in an obvious manner with the leopard being the beast, or rather in the reverse, with the rabbit being the beast consuming the blade of grass.  I like to think the latter is true and hope to reprise the role of “the beast” in a subsequent painting.

Hi-Fructose Features Jolene Lai

Hi-Fructose recently featured Thinkspace Family artists Jolene Lai in an online editorial. The piece highlights several of her works from Lai’s latest exhibition ‘Beside You’ that opened this past February. To view all available works from ‘Beside You’ please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Jolene Lai’s Surreal Paintings Reference Dreams, Childhood : Hi- Fructose

These surreal images can feel both pensive and intense, conjuring familiar images and the otherworldly. The artist, formerly a movie poster designer, often anchors her paintings in youthful contexts.

Kari-Lise Alexander featured on Urban Outfitters Blog

Kari-Lise Alexander recently exhibited a stunning collection of work at Thinkspace Gallery this past April. We’re excited to share her work has also caught the attention of Urban Outfitters, who interviewed Alexander for their weekly featured artists series. Jump over to the UO blog to read the full feature and interview with Kari-Lise Alexander, and visit the Thinkspace Gallery website to view all available work by the artist.

What is your creative process? Do you work from photographs, sketches or from your mind?

I work from all of the above! I start the process for a painting by doing thumbnail sketches from my ideas about what I want to do. From there, I set-up a photo shoot to photograph the reference photos I need. After I’ve selected my reference photo, I start working on the painting. I will often add or subtract things for the final piece depending on what I want for the overall vision.