Coming to the Thinkspace Gallery Office this March – Alvaro Naddeo

We’re excited to announce artist Alvaro Naddeo will be showing his work in the Thinkspace Gallery ‘office’ coming this March.

Alvaro Naddeo is from São Paulo, Brazil and 15 years ago he started to move around as he searched for his path in life. First he found himself living in Lima, Peru then making the big move to New York City, followed by a short stint in Tampa, ultimately landing in Los Angeles where he currently lives and creates. All of these varying urban environments helped to shape his memory and inform his work. From an early age he fell in love with painting, watching his father who is a renowned illustrator work. Due to a lack of self-confidence, Naddeo pushed his brush aside and pursued a career in advertising as an Art Director. Twenty years later, while living in New York City and being exposed to its many contrasts, his desire to pick up his brushes was rejuvenated and he came back to painting with a focused intensity and a newfound confidence. The subject matter of his work is waste, overconsumption and social inequality. The brands, logos and packaging depicted in his work are objects with an inherent duality, both desirable and despicable, a clear byproduct of having worked in consumer advertising for all those years. We here at Thinkspace are excited to see where his work takes him and to be able to help give it an audience.

Scott Listfield Interviewed in Art Maze Mag

Thinkspace Family artist Scott Listfield was recently interviewed in Art Maze Mag discussing astronauts, isolation, and his artistic wisdom.  We still have a few pieces from Scott Listfield’s well-received solo presentation in the Vault Gallery at the Lancaster Museum of Art and History that are available on the  Thinkspace Gallery website.

Jump over to Art Maze Mag’s website for the full interview.

AMM: What influences outside the visual arts inspire and impact your approach to making work?

SL: Oh lots of things. I think there’s a ton of amazing art happening right now, but I’d say that most of my influences come from elsewhere. Books and movies, particularly science fiction. Cartoons, both contemporary and the ones I watched growing up. I listen to a lot of music in the studio which sometimes sets the tone for what I’m working on. I also like to get out and walk around when I can, especially places far from home. Seeing new things gets me back in the mind set of my astronaut.

POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Art Movement: Part IV Exhibition featured on Arrested Motion

arrested motion

Thank you to Arrested Motion for covering Exploring The New Contemporary Art Movement: Part IV exhibition.  Jump over to Arrested Motion’s website to explore the exhibition and view all available work from the show on the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Artists were asked to contribute 12 x 12″ pieces leading to a visually conforming display of works. Rounding things out was a showcase for Shok-1 (seen below) and a Homer Simpson x Banksy parody installation by Oak Oak (seen above). – Arrested Motion

Coming in March – Marco Mazonni’s ‘Dear Collapse’

Marco Mazzoni
Dear Collapse
March 4, 2017 – March 25, 2017

We are  pleased to present its second solo exhibition of new works by Italian artist Marco Mazzoni in Dear Collapse. Mazzoni’s phenomenal drawings have the dense opacity and immersive depth of paintings. He achieves this quality of detail and rich tonality, more commonly associated with wet media, through dry, converting traditional old masters’ painting techniques to pencil. These emphasize dramatic uses of light and contrast, like chiaroscuro and tenebrism, to create dramatic extremes and pitches. The density and richness of his works on paper belie the simplicity of their materiality; though seemingly plush and heavy with wet pigment, they are entirely rendered in Faber Castells. Originally from Tortona in Northern Italy and now based in Milan, Mazzoni is known all over the world for his hauntingly beautiful images of women partially obscured by a hallucinogenic flood of flora and fauna. Caught somewhere between the swell of an eruption and the depletion of devouring, the faces Mazzoni reveals from beneath their burden of petals, leaves, and wings seem to bloom and corrode, as though possessed by a manic biology.

Inspired by ancient Sardinian folklore and its traditions of oral storytelling, Mazzoni is fascinated by the history of its matriarchal culture, and the central role women played as herbalists and healers in the 16th to 18th centuries. These women were objects of both admiration and dread, occupying a position of proximity to the great mysteries of life and death as both midwives and shamans; agented in the rituals of birth and dying. Myths grew from these powerful matriarchies and verbally recounted stories of darkly worlds had women as its subjects and arbiters. Prominent in Sardinian myth are Janas and Cogas, female figures deeply connected to nature who were either enchanted menders or seductive, curse-wielding, witches. Mazzoni’s works capture the ambiguity of these ancient harbingers of feminine power – galvanized as emotional extremes in his works. They appear as beautiful and seductive at times, or as vaguely ominous and morbid at others.

The artist’s technique involves the application of several meticulous layers of color pencil, much like the under paintings used in wet media, and “glazes” or final veils of color are applied as a finishing step to unify the pigment and visual tone of the works. Sketches have always been an integral aspect of the artist’s practice; the preliminary space in which he resolves his compositions and develops concepts and technique. Dear Collapse will include one of Mazzoni’s complete sketchbooks, available through the gallery for the first time, which will be filmed in its entirety by Thinkspace.

Mazzoni’s imagery conveys a heavy sensuality. Faces remain unspecific and anonymous, eyes are seldom revealed, either masked or left as expanses of negative space. The figurative component of his work functions almost as a vessel from which the flowers, plants, and butterflies burst. Seeping from mouths and consuming skins, the plants and flowers – direct references to the ancient traditions of herbal healing and psychoactive poisons – are inextricably merged with bodies. It is always somewhat unclear as to whether the growth comes from within or without, whether the body is the agent or the victim of its consumption. The works are also undeniably erotic, magnetized, suggesting something of the ambivalent coexistence of human desire and repulsion – frenzied bedfellows like beauty and disgust, vitality and rot, life and death – these figures, eerily more than human, are uncomfortably necromanced and bloated with strange, beautiful life.

Coming In March – Atsuko Goto’s ‘The Silence of Idols’

Atsuko Goto
The Silence of Idols
March 4, 2017 – March 25, 2017

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room are new works by emerging Japanese artist Atsuko Goto; The Silence of Idols is the artist’s first solo project with the gallery. A graduate of the Tokyo University of the Arts, Goto also studied at the National School of Fine Arts in Paris.

The artist creates beautifully melancholic images of delicate figures cloaked and merged with natural elements, everything from flowers and butterflies to insects, birds, and fish. Her muted palette is as ghostly as haze, achieved through the unique application of diluted pigments made from semi-precious lapis lazuli, ink, and gum arabic applied to cotton.

Inspired by Japanese Shinto and the belief that nature is animated by divinity and sacred spirits harbored in every living and inanimate thing, Goto creates imagery that conveys this feeling of profuse life force and intangible mystery, offset by a darker suggestion of mourning and lament. Quietly meditative, her works exude a dreamlike calm and resignation despite their abundance of detail and the density of her compositions. Silence and forlorn composure define this existence of the preternatural.

Fragile in their tempered darkness, the works are subtle and near translucent – like the unknown light and strange optics of an otherworldly plane where everything is unsubstantial. A feeling of entrapment and isolation persists, however, in the quietude. Like hauntings from the subconscious, the paintings feel like faded dreams, surreal distortions bordering on the ominous. Unsettling, the muted beauty of these diaphanous idols loom, uncannily caught in a thin veil between worlds.

Opening Reception of Jolene Lai’s “Beside You” & Anthony Clarkson’s “Trail of Wandering Thoughts”

The opening reception of Jolene Lai’s ‘Beside You’ and Anthony Clarkson’s ‘Trail of Wandering Thoughts’ buzzed throughout the night as those in attendance enjoyed the details of the artists work. Jolene Lai’s installation was a first of it’s kind in our main room and Clarkson pushed her artist technique switching from acrylics to oils in his latest body of work. The exhibition is one view now until February 25th.

View available work from Anthony Clarkson and Jolene Lai on the Thinkspace website.

Interview with Anthony Clarkson for “Trail of Wandering Thoughts”

Anthony Clarkson Interview

Thinkspace is proud to present Anthony Clarkson’s latest body of work ‘Trail of Wandering Thoughts’ in our project room on view now through February 25th. The Los Angeles-based artist departed from acrylics and pushed his technique with oils in his latest body of work continuing to create surreal – dreamlike meanderings through eerily cast dimensions.  In anticipation of Clarkson’s upcoming exhibition with us, we have an exclusive interview with Anthony Clarkson to discuss his creative process, growing as an artist, and sources of inspiration.

SH: Can you elaborate on the inspiration for this latest body of work and themes you’ve been exploring?
AC: This is the first group of works I’ve done not really centered around a theme. This time I just painted images that came to mind without really questioning what their meaning was, or trying to say a specific thing with them. I did find it very freeing. I think I’ve always felt in the past I really had to plan out the meaning behind each piece and have them convey a specific idea. I don’t know if I’ll keep conceiving images this way from now on or if I’ll go back to more theme-based works in the future, but I definitely feel some sort of creative wall has been torn down for me mentally.

SH: You’re a full-time artist in the fine art and digital art space? Do these mediums influence each other, are you able to explore or test ideas in one field that is adopted into a different piece?
AC: Yeah, I do both painted and digital art. I tend to keep them pretty separate in my mind, but I do sometimes come up with neat effects in my digital work that I wonder If I’d be able to replicate the look in paint.

SH: In a 2015 interview you shared that you would begin painting more with oils, will we see being seeing a lot more oils in this new body of work? What’s the differences in your ability to express yourself creatively when it comes to using acrylics versus oils?
AC: This is my first show where most everything is in oil. There has been a big learning curve with oils, but I do like them. I feel like I’m just starting to get a grasp on them, so I’m really excited to see what I’m able to do with them on future works. Some of the layering techniques I’m starting to learn are really cool that I think will allow me to do some great lighting effects and create more of a mood.

SH: Can you walk us through a day in the studio?
AC: On a typical day I usually wake up around 10 or so in the morning, and after several cups of coffee and checking e-mails, I start sketching out new painting ideas or jump right into painting if I have pieces already in the works. I usually work until about 7-8pm then take a break for dinner and relax with an hour or two of TV. Around 9pm I jump back into working and it usually goes late into the night. I tend to find I get a lot of my best work done between around 11pm-3am, when the rest of the world has gone to bed. It just feels a lot more peaceful and easier to fall into a natural creative state.

SH: What inspires you creatively? When you’re not painting what are you doing?
AC: Music has always been the biggest inspiration on my art. I can listen to a song and have images and colors come to mind that influence a lot of my paintings. I also love relaxing while watching movies both old and new. Being able to fall into different story narratives than I would have maybe normally come up with on my own can spark a lot of new ideas I can pull into my work.

SH: What would be your dream collaboration? (It can be any art form)
AC: I think it would be really cool to see my art animated and put to music in some way. Since I saw the short piece “Destino” by Salvador Dali in collaboration with Disney I’ve always thought something like that would be really great. I think my art would work for something in that vein really well too.

SH: If your artwork was a food item on a menu, how would it be described?
AC: I have no idea how it would be described, but I’m pretty sure it would be on the 99 cent menu.

SH: What were you listening to during this latest body of work, podcast? Playlist? Netflix?
AC: In the mornings I usually listen to a few different podcasts throughout the week such as Tell ‘Em Steve-Dave, Smodcast, Fat Man on Batman, The Nerdist, WTF, The Eddie Trunk Podcast.
In the afternoons I listen to music most of the time. I love heavy metal and listen to a lot of classic bands like Iron Maiden, Metallica, Dio, Judas Priest, Megadeth, Slayer, Black Sabbath, and Pantera. Also various other bands like Katatonia, Anathema, Tiamat, Ulver, and always some Depeche Mode and The Cure

In the evenings after dinner, I put on movies in the background. When painting I almost always play movies I’ve seen several times so I can just let the story wash over me and don’t have to focus on a new story. Just a few of the regulars that keep getting plays while I paint are Taxi Driver, Dr. Strangelove, American Beauty, Boogie Nights, Adaptation, Holy Mountain, Lost in Translation, A Clockwork Orange, and anything Alfred Hitchcock. Along with lots of old Twilight Zone episodes.

SH: What elements of other art inspires you? What artists are you fawning over right now?
AC: I tend to be drawn to artists that use really dynamic shadows and lighting. That’s always something I want to get a lot better at and get more depth and dynamics from my paintings. Also, artists who do an image design from a different view or angle than I would have thought of and is able to bring out more dynamics in the image that way.
There are so many artists I’m into right now, but I tend to be drawn to seeing works by people who do vastly different styles than my own because I can almost always find a technique or something in them that I can try to incorporate into my own works in my own way.
Right now I am really looking forward to the new show from Marco Mazzoni coming up. I love what he does with colored pencils. Back in high school, I was going through a big colored pencil phase when I was moving on from pen and ink work. I would go through boxes of Prismacolors trying to get a very painted look with them. So seeing what he does is really cool to me, like seeing the kind of thing I might have done had I kept working in that medium.

SH: You’ve been showing with Thinkspace for the last ten years. As an artist, how do you push yourself artistically without compromising your unique style?
AC: I think as far as the “world” I’ve been creating and trying to dive deeper into with my images I know where I’m going. It’s just about keeping going down that path. For me, the pushing myself comes from learning new techniques or using new mediums, like going from acrylic to oil paints. Overall I think I know what my grand vision for my art is that I’m trying to achieve, it’s just experimenting to find the best ways of pulling it off and putting in the hours of work to get better at creating that vision.

View all available works from ‘Trail of Wandering Thoughts‘ on the Thinkspace Gallery website.