New Works by Bumblebeelovesyou in #WhereWeBeelong

BumblebeeLovesYou

Bumblebeelovesyou
#WhereWeBeelong
June 20th – July 11th

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room is #WhereWeBeelong featuring new works by LA based artist Bumblebeelovesyou. Known for his iconic street art pieces of playful children set in urban contexts, Bumblebee draws from a nostalgic love of childhood memory and its simplicity. Invested in the communicative power of imagery, he brings a poignant vision of innocence to life by drawing our attention to its displacement. Often clad in the artist’s preference for black and yellow, his graphically simple and stenciled characters are harbingers of hope and redemption; reminders of youth and promise in the darkness of gritty urban recesses.

Bumblebeelovesyou began his work on abandoned buildings in the town of Downey in South East Los Angeles County. He has created large-scale mural works and architectural interventions throughout the US, often under the auspices of raising awareness for social issues such as youth homelessness. Preoccupied thematically with the progress of time and change, Bumblebee creates thoughtful works about transition and the coming of age. Hopeful and reminiscent, though at times unsettling, his depictions of youth are set in stark contrast to the urban contexts in which they appear. Nonetheless, his works manage to convey a feeling of incorruptible buoyancy; a remembrance of light in the midst of unavoidable darkness. With an investment and awareness for social and environmental themes, his images remind us of the invaluable gift of beginnings, and the shared responsibility of ensuring continuity.

bumblebeelovesyou teaser

First LA based solo exhibition from Low Bros – Wasted Youth

Low Bros Jux Ad

Low Bros
Wasted Youth
June 20th – July 11th

Thinkspace (Los Angeles) – is pleased to present Wasted Youth, the first LA based solo exhibition of works by sibling artist duo Low Bros. Based in Berlin, and originally from Hamburg, the Low Bros consists of brothers Christoph and Florin Schmidt, formerly known by their aliases Qbrk and Nerd. Their murals and street art collaborations have transformed urban landscapes around the world, punctuating streets and accenting structures with a host of memorable and hyper-stylized characters. The Low Bros have developed an urban mythology with a cast of recurring characters and fictional crews, brought to life by a visual shorthand that is unmistakably their own. Drawing from 80’s and 90’s skateboard, graffiti and hip hop cultures, the brothers appropriate imagery from the graphic histories that defined their youth, and transform nostalgia into something entirely fresh and innovative.

Combining elements from the animal and human worlds, the Low Bros fuse urban references with those taken from nature. Their animal characters, ranging from tigers and cheetahs to “teen wolves”, are subcultural emblems or hyper-stylized stereotypes. As stand-ins for the human, this anthropomorphic animal world is mischievous and whimsical, while also jarring and unexpected in its juxtapositions. Graphically deconstructed and reassembled as an amalgam of strangely wonderful surreal worlds, the man-made collides with a hallucinatory animal kingdom that mimics its conventions and affects. Incorporating elements of psychedelia, West Coast skate culture, early video games and 80’s and 90’s graphic design – all brought to life with a tongue-in-cheek machismo – the Low Bros create pieces that are undeniably irreverent and playful.

The work is distinctly geometric, as though structurally composited from individual blocks or planes of color, and hovers somewhere between cubist cut-out, graffiti script and 16/32-bit atari graphics. These meticulously faceted pieces spare no attention to detail, while the intense color combinations and shading bring it all to life. The Low Bros are constantly setting up visual tensions between two-dimensional and three-dimensional optics, channeling a simultaneity of perspectives. Oscillating between flatness and dimension, some areas feel static and hard-edged while others are fluid and organic. The clever composition of these effective contrasts results in an unexpected richness of spatial depth and plasticity.

Self-taught graffiti writers, the brothers work primarily in acrylic paints and aerosols. In addition to their site-specific murals, individual panels and prints, they have also made recent forays into video and installation, bringing their motley cast of urban animals to life. The Wasted Youth exhibition will coincide with a large public project in Los Angeles, their first, and will include a large site-specific gallery mural and an installation component. Though their work is so clearly inspired by Californian youth and pop culture, the Low Bros are visiting LA for the first time on the occasion of the exhibition. An ironic nod to their mother’s admonishing cautions that graffiti was “a waste of their youth”, the Low Bros exhibition title embodies their penchant for irony, humor and, above all else, audacious play.

low bros finshed piece teaser

Thinkspace Family on Instagram

Instagram is by far the spot where we share the most content, more than any other social outlet. You will always find us posting sneak peeks, studio shots, and much more on Instagram. It’s also the first place we drop early information on big events.

If you’re not already following us on Instagram, please be sure you are doing so at @thinkspace_art. For those with out a smart phone, just click here to view our feed online. We want to be sure you’re following our family of artists too, so we will aim to showcase a handful here each week moving ahead. If you don’t want to wait, you can always check our instagram account and see who were following and tagging there as well.

 FOLLOW OUR FAMILY : 

Yosuke Ueno | @yosuke_ueno

Ariel DeAndrea | @cranegirl1

Curiot |@curiotli

David Cooley | @davidcooleyart

Eine | @einesigns

Ekundayo | @sorrowbecomesjoy

Jacub Gagnon | @jacubgagnon

James Marshal “Dalek” | @dalek2020

Meggs | @houseofmeggs

Kevin Peterson | @kevinpetersonart

 

STUDIO PREVIEW OF NEW WORK IN LAX/DTW

Liz Brizzi

piece by Liz Brizzi – featured artist in LAX/DTW at Inner State Gallery

LAX/DTW is only a few weeks away and the artists have been busy in their studios preparing for the show. This collaborative show with Inner State Gallery in Detroit, Michigan features 16×20 inch works from over 80 artists spanning the globe, including featured artists: Stephanie Buer and Liz Brizzi. The opening reception is Saturday, June 6th 7-10PM, and the exhibition will be on view through July 4th, 2015. For additional details please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Enjoy the following peak of the ‘works in progress’ for LAX/DTW

artist stephanie buer Featured artist Stephanie Buer

James BulloughJames Bullough

Bec WinnelBec Winnel

Ken FlewellynKen Flewellyn

DalekJames Marshall (Dalek)

Sales for this special exhibition are going through Inner State, so please be sure to reach out to them to receive the preview. Contact them via info@innerstategallery.com

‘Invisible College’ at the Fort Wayne Museum Of Art

invisible college fort wayne

We are excited to announce Thinkspace’s upcoming co-curated exhibition ‘Invisible College’ at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana. 

Invisible College
Co-curated by Andrew Hosner, Shawn Hosner & Josef Zimmerman

Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana
July 11th – September 27th, 2015

(Fort Wayne, IN) – Opening July 11th, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art will host Invisible College, a group exhibition co-curated by Andrew and Shawn Hosner of Los Angeles’ Thinkspace Gallery, and Josef Zimmerman of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art. On view until September 27th, the exhibition will feature new and representative works by 46 artists belonging to the New Contemporary movement. Dedicated to the energy and strength of its growing visibility and recognition, Invisible College explores the aesthetics of a movement that has devised its own course; one that has been largely defined outside of institutional contexts. Moving away from the standard art education model that demands graduate school, an excess of critical rhetoric and an art world careerism, these artists, many of whom are self-taught, have sought their own inspiration and voice instead, drawing on everything from popular culture and social media platforms, to street art, murals and graffiti. By creating a distinct community in support of the diversity of its visions and styles, the movement has mortared and upheld its own invisible school.

The New Contemporary movement, widely acknowledged to have begun in the early 90’s on the West Coast, evolved in reaction to a conceptual turn in fine art. Founded in part on a rejection of the arbitrary division of visual culture that tends to elevate “high art” above the social and popular realms, the movement invoked the countercultural and drew content from an immersion in social experience. The standard of excessive academicism and abstraction, against which it grew, was commonly held in higher regard than more figurative, graphic or representational forms of art. This marginalization inspired the New Contemporary movement to set its own terms and create its own context for the reception of its work. With a renewed emphasis on technical skill, narrative and representation, it has encouraged a social return in art. The Invisible College captures the energetic irreverence and variety that has continued to shape the movement and its spirit of self-determinism. The works included in this exhibition range from the illustrative and graphic, to the surreal and figurative, embodying in one way or another the populist sensibility that makes the movement so exciting, current and relatable.

Invisible College offers a cross-section of some of the most exciting artists working in the New Contemporary genre. As it continues to evolve and expand, the movement embraces talent from all over the world and ushers in a new-guard that seeks to increase the social and popular relevance of contemporary art. Rather than limiting their work’s reception to art world initiates, these artists create pieces inspired by popular and street cultures, summoning the world back into art rather than championing its exclusion and remove.

Invisible College will include works by Adam Caldwell, Adrian Falkner, Alex Yanes, Allison Sommers, Amanda Joseph, Andrew Hem, Brian M. Viveros, Christine Wu, Cryptik, Curiot, Daniel Dienelt, David Cooley, Drew Leshko, Ekundayo, Erik Jones, Ernest Zacharevic, Gaia, Jacub Gagnon, James Marshall (Dalek), Jeff Ramirez, Jeremy Fish, Joel Daniel Phillips, Jolene Lai, Kay Gregg, Keita Morimoto, Kevin Peterson, Know Hope, Kwon Kyungyup, Luke Chueh, Matt Small, Meggs, Natalia Fabia, Nosego, Ravi Zupa, Sandra Chevrier, Scott Radke, Seth Armstrong, Stephanie Buer, Tony Philippou, Troy Lovegates, Yoskay Yamamoto and Yosuke Ueno. Included in Invisible College are special mural installations by Andrew Schoultz, Cyrcle, Mark Dean Veca and Troy Lovegates. The exhibition will also include a featured installation by Brett Amory.

Fort Wayne Museum of Art
311 E Main Street
Fort Wayne, Indiana
46802
www.fwmoa.org
(260) 422-6467

About the Fort Wayne Museum of Art
Beginning with art classes in 1888 given by J. Ottis Adams and later William Forsyth, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art has evolved into a center for the visual arts community in Northeast Indiana. Regularly exhibiting regional and nationally acclaimed artists, the FWMoA also boasts an extensive permanent collection of American Art as well as prints and drawings from artists such as Jackson Pollock and Andy Warhol. The Museum is committed to the collection, preservation, presentation and interpretation of American and related art to engage broad and diverse audiences throughout the community and region, and add value to their lives. The Fort Wayne Museum of Art is a funded partner of Arts United of Greater Fort Wayne.
www.fwmoa.org

About Thinkspace Gallery
Founded in 2005, Thinkspace gallery was established with a commitment to the promotion and dissemination of young and emerging art. The Culver City gallery is a catalyst for the emerging art scene in Los Angeles and beyond, and is dedicated to the exposure of its artists and the support of their tenets. This young movement, straddled between street art, graphic art, design and popular culture, is subject to steadily increasing international exposure and interest, and is in need of institutional advocates. Thinkspace is positioned to create opportunities and act as a visible platform for the New Contemporary movement, and its aim as a gallery is to establish both a curatorial forum and a collector base for its output. As an institution, Thinkspace is committed to vision, risk and the exceptional talents that wield it. From the streets to the gallery, from the “margins” to the white cube, Thinkspace is re-envisioning what it means to be “institutional”. As a haven for talent, and a venue founded in passion, conviction, and community, the gallery’s mandate is rooted in belief and support.
http://thinkspacegallery.com