Opening Reception of BEZT “Beautiful Mistakes” at Spoke Art NYC

It’s the last week to view BEZT’s “Beautiful Mistakes” at Spoke Art NYC. We’re appreciative of all those who came out to the opening on October 21st and thrilled to share photos of the evening snapped by Lane E. Bird. The exhibition displays incredible new works by BEZT and is on view through November 5th.

For more information on “Beautiful Mistakes” visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.

 

Andrew Hosner Featured In GRAFFITI ART MAGAZINE

We feel a great sense of pride seeing the artists we represent interviewed in the pages of our favorite art magazine, so when one of our co-owners gets some attention, it puts us over the moon. We’re extremely excited to share Andrew Hosner, Thinkspace Gallery co-owner and curator’s 10-page spread in French publication Graffiti Art Magazines. The article discusses how Andrew’s background in the music industry informs his approach to the art world.  You can view a PDF version of the article here, Andrew Hosner L’amplificateur.”  

‘Beautiful Mistakes’ Debut U.S. solo exhibition from BEZT (Etam Cru)

‘Beautiful Mistakes’
Debut U.S. solo exhibition from
BEZT (Etam Cru)
On view through November 4 at:
Spoke NYC / 210 Rivington Street in New York, NY 10002
Thank you to all of you that came out this past Saturday in NYC and supported our solo show with BEZT from Etam Cru. It was a pleasure to work with our friends at Spoke Art again on this special exhibition. Congrats go out to BEZT as well for an incredible new body of work. The exhibition remains on view through November 4.
BEZT (Etam Cru) - "Together We Will Live Forever"
BEZT
‘Together We Will Live Forever’
Edition of 50
19.6×27.5 inches / 50x70cm
7 color screen print on coventry rag paper
Printed by Serio Press (Los Angeles, CA.)
Hand-signed and numbered by the artist
$225
Prints can be purchased here:
BEZT (Etam Cru) - "Beautiful Mistakes" (Print)
BEZT
‘Beautiful Mistakes’
Edition of 75
24×24 inches
Fine art print on 300gsm Moab Somerset Museum Rag
Signed and numbered by the artist
$175
Prints can be purchased here:

BEZT
‘First Four Seconds’
Edition of 125
24×24 inches
Fine art print on 300gsm Moab Somerset Museum Rag
Signed and numbered by the artist
$150
Prints can be purchased here, almost sold out:

ICY AND SOT’s ‘Human (Nature)’ Opens Next Saturday, November 4th.

ICY and SOT
‘Human (Nature)’
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 4 from 6-9PM
On view November 4 – November 25

Thinkspace is pleased to present Human (Nature), its first solo exhibition and full gallery takeover by internationally acclaimed Iranian, Brooklyn-based artist-activist duo, ICY and SOT. The brothers, born in the northwestern Iranian city of Tabriz, started their legacy as street artists by producing simple, single layer stencils and wheat pasted stickers in 2006. Throwing them up covertly, and as quickly as possible, wherever they could throughout the city’s less-traveled recesses, ICY and SOT were genuinely tapped into the impermanence of street art as a medium given their interventions would last no more than 24 hours in the highly regulated and censored Islamic political regime. Isolated by the political oppression steadily in place since the Islamic Revolution of the late ’70s, the brothers, and their art grew and thrived under severely impeded circumstances.

All public exhibits and expressions of art in Iran are subject to intense scrutiny and suppression, forced to submit to government approval before any kind of dissemination. This is the unlikely political climate under which ICY and SOT found their voice. Every act of creativity under said circumstances becomes an act of protest and countercultural dissent, not to mention one of great risk and uncertainty. The brothers are no strangers to reprimand in a country where the political stranglehold demands imprisonment for minor acts of transgression. Their earliest imagery grew from this place of profound longing, driven by a desire to express compassion, truth, hope, and connect with the silenced cities and its inhabitants. Some of their first intercessions into the Iranian streets were recurring representations of children, specifically of a little boy with downcast stance walking forward. In their minds, the clearest and most direct expression of innocence and resilience they could invoke in a world of adult subjugation and violence.

One of the more remarkable aspects of the brothers’ work is that it evolved in a near cultural vacuum, emerging from anonymity and under the most restrictive circumstances to international recognition and acclaim. Though there were punk and skater countercultures that emerged in Iran in spite of the prevailing political climate, the brothers had no access to other manifestations of “street art” as an international genre with historical antecedents. It wasn’t until they were able to access internet sites beyond Iran’s firewall that they came into contact with other examples of the medium and its emergence as a “legitimate” art form, owing in significant part to New York’s vibrant 70’s and 80’s city culture. It was also through social media and image-based sites like Flickr that they were finally able to circulate photographic evidence of their work, the only extant and surviving record of their highly temporary intercessions in the streets of Iran, and were able to amass a following, connecting them with other artists and exponents of street-based art.

Finally, in 2012 they were granted travel Visas to attend a solo exhibition of their work in New York City, traveling to the US and leaving Iran for the first time. They took the opportunity to immigrate, settling in Brooklyn with mounting legal tensions surrounding their freedom of expression at home, and have since established themselves as thriving, generous, and active members of the artist community there. They have now created work all over the world, delivering poignant and humbling expressions of human pathos and compassion worldwide. Their output is immediately recognizable for its clean graphic aesthetic, reminiscent of print media, their use of elaborate multi-layer stencils, and now photo-based and sculptural works.
Increasing in sophistication and diversity of messaging, the brothers have tackled topics such as poverty, homelessness, women’s rights, gun control, immigration, and climate change, converting the same terse and impactful language they had cultivated as political acts of protest in their home country to gestures of activism worldwide. Their work has richly evolved into several tangential and intersecting adjuncts as they continue to experiment with not only murals and walls, but gallery-based artworks, public interventions, like their advertising takeover series, and site-specific sculptural installations. All executed in the same minimal graphic language, sparse color, through clean impactful compositions.
In Human (Nature) ICY and SOT return to one of the most fundamental and widely disavowed plights that face us, globally and universally as humankind – the necessity of nurturing the environment we have steadily marauded and violated beyond repair. Invoking the peaceful balance of nature as a counterpoint to the deleterious effects of human consumption and waste, ICY and SOT want to inspire us all to see the planet’s vulnerability and to make small strides towards productive change and personal accountability.
The brothers continue their inspiring pursuit of truth and personal expression, reminding us with every public emission and imprint left on the world of the real power of art, imagery, and public activism in a world of discouraging desensitization. Now, more than ever, the active cultivation of freedom, mutual respect, and compassion through art is the cultural lifeline we’d all do well to support.

 

Thinkspace x Moniker International Art Fair Press

We had an amazing time at the Moniker International Art Fair, but don’t take it from us. Below is a few press placements highlighting our Moniker takeover.

Art Net

Worth mentioning is the vast, eight-stand takeover by leading Los Angeles-based gallery, Thinkspace. In the first five hours of sales, the California gallery reported an income of over £100,000 across its group show and seven solo exhibitions, including the UK debut of Audrey Kawasaki, whose lowbrow artworks command between £15,000-£25,000 on the market, and other stands dedicated to Kevin Peterson, David Cooley, Brian Viveros, and Cinta Vidal. – Art Net

London’s Financial Times on MONIKER

“(Thinkspace are the) mandarin of the graphic and urban art scene.” – Financial Times

London Calling Blog

 Thinkspace Gallery visiting from LA stole the show with an incredible 7 solo shows and one group exhibition – two of which sold out entirely on the preview night – with Dulk’s solo show ‘Extinction’ being our favourite show of the event.  – London Calling Blog

Andy Kehoe’s “PRISMATIC” & Alvaro Naddeo’s “Not Forgotten” Opening Night

The opening of Andy Kehoe’s “PRISMATIC” and Alavaro Naddeo’s “Not Forgotten”  filled the gallery with artists friends and art enthusiasts to view both beautiful collections of work. Kehoe’s magical dreamscape world is multilayered with texture and glittering landscapes that can be truly appreciated in person. The imagination runs wild amongst the trees and seaside coasts that Kehoe creates.  In the project room, Naddeo’s work continues to explore the items and values that shape one’s identity in urban environments, informed by a nomadic life.

Both artists work is now on view until October 21st , Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6pm

The view all available works from Andy Kehoe and Alvaro Naddeo please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Please note Thinkspace Gallery will be closed, Saturday, October 14th. 

ICY and SOT’s “HUMAN (NATURE)” Coming to Thinkspace Gallery

ICY and SOT
HUMAN (NATURE)
November 4 – November 25, 2017

(Los Angeles, CA) – Thinkspace is pleased to present Human (Nature), its first solo exhibition and full gallery takeover by internationally acclaimed Iranian, Brooklyn-based artist-activist duo, ICY and SOT. The brothers, born in the northwestern Iranian city of Tabriz, started their legacy as street artists by producing simple, single layer stencils and wheat pasted stickers in 2006. Throwing them up covertly, and as quickly as possible, wherever they could throughout the city’s less-traveled recesses, ICY and SOT were genuinely tapped into the impermanence of street art as a medium given their interventions would last no more than 24 hours in the highly regulated and censored Islamic political regime. Isolated by the political oppression steadily in place since the Islamic Revolution of the late ‘70s, the brothers, and their art grew and thrived under severely impeded circumstances.

All public exhibits and expressions of art in Iran are subject to intense scrutiny and suppression, forced to submit to government approval before any kind of dissemination. This is the unlikely political climate under which ICY and SOT found their voice. Every act of creativity under said circumstances becomes an act of protest and countercultural dissent, not to mention one of great risk and uncertainty. The brothers are no strangers to reprimand in a country where the political stranglehold demands imprisonment for minor acts of transgression. Their earliest imagery grew from this place of profound longing, driven by a desire to express compassion, truth, hope, and connect with the silenced cities and its inhabitants. Some of their first intercessions into the Iranian streets were recurring representations of children, specifically of a little boy with downcast stance walking forward. In their minds, the clearest and most direct expression of innocence and resilience they could invoke in a world of adult subjugation and violence.

One of the more remarkable aspects of the brothers’ work is that it evolved in a near cultural vacuum, emerging from anonymity and under the most restrictive circumstances to international recognition and acclaim. Though there were punk and skater countercultures that emerged in Iran in spite of the prevailing political climate, the brothers had no access to other manifestations of “street art” as an international genre with historical antecedents. It wasn’t until they were able to access internet sites beyond Iran’s firewall that they came into contact with other examples of the medium and its emergence as a “legitimate” art form, owing in significant part to New York’s vibrant 70’s and 80’s city culture. It was also through social media and image-based sites like Flickr that they were finally able to circulate photographic evidence of their work, the only extant and surviving record of their highly temporary intercessions in the streets of Iran, and were able to amass a following, connecting them with other artists and exponents of street-based art.

Finally, in 2012 they were granted travel Visas to attend a solo exhibition of their work in New York City, traveling to the US and leaving Iran for the first time. They took the opportunity to immigrate, settling in Brooklyn with mounting legal tensions surrounding their freedom of expression at home, and have since established themselves as thriving, generous, and active members of the artist community there. They have now created work all over the world, delivering poignant and humbling expressions of human pathos and compassion worldwide. Their output is immediately recognizable for its clean graphic aesthetic, reminiscent of print media, their use of elaborate multi-layer stencils, and now photo-based and sculptural works. Increasing in sophistication and diversity of messaging, the brothers have tackled topics such as poverty, homelessness, women’s rights, gun control, immigration, and climate change, converting the same terse and impactful language they had cultivated as political acts of protest in their home country to gestures of activism worldwide. Their work has richly evolved into several tangential and intersecting adjuncts as they continue to experiment with not only murals and walls, but gallery-based artworks, public interventions, like their advertising takeover series, and site-specific sculptural installations. All executed in the same minimal graphic language, sparse color, through clean impactful compositions.

In Human (Nature) ICY and SOT return to one of the most fundamental and widely disavowed plights that face us, globally and universally as humankind – the necessity of nurturing the environment we have steadily marauded and violated beyond repair. Invoking the peaceful balance of nature as a counterpoint to the deleterious effects of human consumption and waste, ICY and SOT want to inspire us all to see the planet’s vulnerability and to make small strides towards productive change and personal accountability.

The brothers continue their inspiring pursuit of truth and personal expression, reminding us with every public emission and imprint left on the world of the real power of art, imagery, and public activism in a world of discouraging desensitization. Now, more than ever, the active cultivation of freedom, mutual respect, and compassion through art is the cultural lifeline we’d all do well to support.