New Josh Keyes Print Dropping Friday, September 15th.

Josh Keyes 
‘I’ll Love You Till the End of the World’ 
Edition of 300
Fine art print on 290gsm paper
16×25.5 inches / 40.6×64.7cm
Hand-signed numbered and titled by the artist

$250 each (plus CA. tax and shipping & handling)

Available for online sale this Friday, September 15 at 10 AM Pacific at:

I’ll Love You Till the End of the World‘ is taken from Keyes’ SOLD OUT solo show ‘Implosion’ that was on view this past August at Thinkspace. This new edition was photographed and printed by the amazing team out at Static Medium. This stunning edition has been hand-titled by Keyes along with numbering and signing.

Our new web shop takes a variety of payment methods and calculates the shipping for each order. Prints usually ship out within a week of your order being received. Please note that this does not mean you will receive your print in a week, just to be crystal clear. Please allow shipping time based on where you live in the world. Details will be shared when your print is on the way. Thank you for your support.

Opening Reception of SWANK at Thinkspace Gallery

The opening reception of Swank on September 2nd debuted nine artists from the gallery’s roster, whose work and recognition are on the rise. Each brings their own unique stylistic and technical approach to their practice, and though they share loose affinities, the grouping demonstrates the diversity and latitude of the New Contemporary Movement. Michael Reeder, David Rice, Tran Nguyen, Wiley Wallace, Molly Gruninger, Alex Garant, Sean Norvet, Christopher Konecki, and Lauren Brevner were curated by the gallery for this exhibition as promising new voices to watch on their ascent.

 Please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website to view available work from SWANK,

Robert Williams “SLANG Aesthetics!” at The Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum

Robert William’s “SLANG Aesthetics!” opened at The Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum on Friday, September 8th. The loss of friend and fellow art advocate Greg Escalante hung in the air, but the night proceeded as a celebration of the movement Escalante and Williams built together.

ALVARO NADDEO Alvaro Naddeo’s “Not Forgotten” Opens at Thinkspace Gallery September 30th

ALVARO NADDEO
NOT FORGOTTEN
September 30 – October 21, 2017

Concurrently on view in the project room is Not Forgotten, featuring new works by Los Angeles-based Alvaro Naddeo. Originally from São Paulo, Brazil, Naddeo is a self-taught painter whose work explores all manner of objects drawn from the various urban environments that have shaped his memory and imagination. Autobiographical in nature, the work contains symbolic references to his own nomadic past and his transitions through the landscapes of several different cities and countries.

Much of Naddeo’s work focuses on his societal concern over rampant consumption and waste, as well annexation and poverty, depicting accumulations of objects and detritus drawn from the city. Not Forgotten is Naddeo’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. A 20-year veteran in advertising and art direction, Naddeo has reapplied himself to the creation of his own work after a substantial hiatus. Creating primarily with watercolor on paper, the level of detail he can convey captures the humanity of these inanimate urban remnants with true soul, tinged with a subtle feeling of melancholy and loss.

Jeremy Fish & AbsoluteXtracts

A cool collaboration between AbsoluteXtracts and Jeremy Fish have resulted in a chic and stylish vape solution. Visit AbsoluteXtracts website for more details on these stylish Fish Tanks.

Fans of Jeremy Fish’s work can still view his exhibition “The Los Angelurkers” now through September 10th at the Fullerton Museum Center. Visit Thinkspace Gallery website for more information.

Terry Arena on Artist A Day – August 9th

Thinkspace’s current exhibiting artists Terry Arena is the featured artists on the website, Artist A Day for August 9th.  We’re excited her beautiful and delicate works is receiving this 24-hour recognition. To see more of her work in person, stop by Thinkspace Gallery now through August 26th for her exhibition SWARM in the office area.

View all available works from Terry Arena here.

Read our recent interview with Terry Arena here.

Interview with Terry Arena for ‘Swarm’

Thinkspace is proud to exhibit artist Terry Arena in the office area this upcoming Saturday. Terry Arena’s Swarm is a series of works of detailed and delicate renderings of bees in graphite on gessoed objects. In anticipation of Swarm, we have an exclusive interview with Terry Arena to discuss the inspiration behind her work and creative process.

Swarm is on view Saturday, August 5th through August 26th.

SH: What inspired Symbiotic Crisis? Was there a singular moment that triggered this decision to explore this topic in your body of work or did it slowly evolve?
TA: I had been making work about food culture. Think homemade meal prep, processed food, gmo’s, organics, etc… One day I heard an interview on NPR that was discussing how bees were being transported across the country to pollinate various crops. The visual of hundreds of thousands of bees loaded onto an eighteen wheeler struck me as odd. I had never really thought about the bees’ role in food propagation. It’s pretty critical when you consider bees participate in producing a large part of our food supply. The almond industry alone is a billion-dollar industry and is reliant on pollination for its success. At that point, my focus shifted to bees and colony collapse disorder(CCD).

SH: What do you love about working with graphite? And how has the medium helped to shape your work?
TA: I love that it is an ordinary low tech material, yet has the ability to be very sophisticated. Originally, it came into the work because I felt it supported the notion of simple methodologies having worth. In my research of food culture and then CCD I kept finding that maybe the best solution to problems (proliferation of varroa mites for example) might be to step back and let the natural order of things occur (swarming in spring to break the varroa life cycle). And my work is analytical, so graphite just works in that regard.

SH: What is your creative process? Can you walk us through a day in the studio?
TA: It really depends on where I am in a project. For the Symbiotic Crisis (bee) pieces there is a lot of surface prep. I might spend time cruising thrift stores looking for cookie tins to draw on and then I get them home to clean, sand, and prime. After that, it’s many layers of gesso with sanding between each layer. While surfaces are curing I often go through my source materials or look around the garden for new subjects. I draw both from life and photo references, so I have a pretty good collection of dead things in my freezer. It’s a little odd, but my family and friends know about my work and are always saving me dead bees, interesting bugs, and birds… I have four dead birds in the freezer. They are beautiful. Once surfaces are ready, I pose my subjects in a set and take lots of photographs with various lighting. Then it’s a line drawing followed by hours of rendering under a magnifying lamp. This year my goal was to complete 100 drawings in for the series. They are all essentially done, but I have a handful that I am still editing. There is always something to do in the studio either for my current work or projects I am planning for the future.

SH: What is your favorite fruit and/or vegetable?
TA: I would be very happy eating an avocado every day…maybe even two!

SH: Your work in the past was inspired by the Slow Food movement. Do you find exploring these ideas and circumstances the world finds itself in within your work a form of analyzation or is it more of a catharsis? The work giving you a voice in the greater conversation.
TA: I must admit that I really enjoy the research from studying my subjects under the magnifying lens to learning about pesticide use. I also think I just want to feed my family delicious healthy food that will not cause harm over time. Maybe it’s a leave no trace theory…no extensive trace (I am realistic) of strange chemicals in our bodies or the environment. I want to be a part of the conversation of protecting the bees and providing better food systems. It takes a collective consciousness to make big changes socially and this subject resonates for me.

SH: What inspires you and draws you to other artists’ work?
TA: I’m a sucker for craft and wonderment. It’s a thrill and wholly satisfying when work can evoke joy or challenge you to consider ideas much greater than yourself.

SH: What do you listen to while drawing; podcasts, Netflix, music? What should we check out?
TA: I’m definitely in an information phase right now. I try to keep up with the world by listening to NPR and then lighten up with the comedic takes of Stephen Colbert and Trevor Noah. I often slip down the rabbit hole of Youtube and have found great interviews and documentaries on Rachel Carson of Silent Spring, Noam Chomsky for his views on just about anything, and a little Elon Musk cause rocket ship rides to Mars and 3D underground transport are pretty fascinating!

SH: If your work inspired a cocktail, what would be the recipe and what would it taste like?
TA: I’m more of a whiskey on the rocks gal, but at Campfire in Carlsbad they make amazing drinks that are so beautiful and tasty I would love to have provided inspiration for one of their creations. A real beauty with a kick is their “Roasted Beet”. The flavor is bright with a bit of spice. Think gin, ginger, honey, lemon and thyme with a vibrant magenta color.