Interview with Dulk for “Legacy” Opening December 1st at Thinkspace Culver City

We’re pleased to present “Legacy” featuring new paintings and drawings by Spanish painter, illustrator, and muralist Dulk. This is the artist’s second solo exhibition with Thinkspace, and we’re honored to be showcasing the internationally known artist who creates worlds of stylized Animalia and character creatures. Our interview with Dulk discusses the inspiration behind the exhibition, his creative process, and favorite mural festival memory.

Join us for the opening reception of “Legacy December 1st from 6 pm to 9 pm. 

SH: What was the inspiration behind this latest body of work?
DK: In this body of work I wanted to go a little further than in the previous exhibitions and look for a link between the beginning and the end of the life. We come from the earth and in these artworks everything seems to return to it. Although the earth keeps on turning on its axis and keeps orbiting around the Sun, for our everyday lives it is still the most solid groundbase we have.

In the same way, the multiple characters that swarm in the mirror-like depths of these paintings appear to be arrested, frozen and petrified. Everything flows in a motionless paroxysm. Human nature makes us not really see what is happening before our eyes, we do not see the problems or maybe we do not want to see them. Hence, this attempt to camouflage the disaster.

This exhibition confronts us with a fantastic world where everything flows, changes and transforms in manifold different ways. That being said, the underlying discourse is unified, categorical and self-evident: man is killing Nature and its incredible biodiversity which we ought to love for many reasons but which, nevertheless, we are destroying day by day, step by step.

SH: How do you capture ideas for pieces; do you have a sketchbook on hand or is it just a note to yourself in your phone?
DK: Normally I always bring with me a moleskine where I write down words, concepts or small drawings with notes. You never know when an idea may come to you so it is necessary to be prepared. If for any reason I don’t have it, I usually write it down on my mobile phone and as soon as I get to my computer I put it on a list. Many of them will never see the light, but it is good to have a folder of possible ideas stored in the trunk.

Nature photography is my other passion, many of the images I shoot in my travels are the basis of my future creations. I also follow many nature photographers and I have a very complete folder of photographic material in which I immerse myself before starting a new piece. I usually start from an element, central character that I want to represent for some reason and from here I imagine its history.

SH: What excites you about your work / creative process?
DK: My work shows the inner vision of my personal tastes. I remember when I was a child and I saw my father’s illustrated bird books, I thought, when I grow up I want to be a bird cartoonist. It sounded very surreal and I laugh when I remember it, today it is not what I dedicate myself to 100%, but it has a direct relationship with those dreams of childhood.

I enjoy my work from the first step. Organizing my research/inspiration trips or researching in my editorial collection. This step is one of the ones I like most about the creation process because that’s where everything comes from, it’s the moment when you start giving life to new works and you feel emotion for the future of the piece. Without any doubt, it is where creativity gains more power.

My work makes me happy because it brings together my two passions, nature and art and that makes me feel very fortunate. On the other hand, not everything is beautiful, you live in constant pressure, it is a very difficult profession to carry, many trips, uncontrolled pace and often a bit chaotic but I am sure that without all this it would not be me. You have to feel it. Each project is a new game, a whole thing full of sensations that make you more prepared for the next.

SH: What frustrates you about your work/ creative process?
DK: I do not really have any relevant negative feelings, maybe the only thing could be work times, I’m very methodical and I spend a lot of time in the pre-production phase of the works, drawing and researching and maybe that delays me the production tempos, but at the same time, I think that it is necessary to invest that time to establish the foundations of the project with more strength. Many times I envy people with styles that can be reproduced by another hand than the artist’s own, because you can cover many more projects simultaneously, but at the same time I think that work loses its warmth. Still, that is what can frustrate me the most, not being able to reach all the projects I would like. This is the good and the bad thing about having such a personal style, it makes it unique in all the senses. I enjoy every step of the creative process, so I try to take care of and pamper every piece from the first stroke to its last detail.

SH: Do you remember your dreams? If so, can you share with us one of your more recent vivid dreamscapes?
DK: The truth is that I do not usually remember dreams, only when I wake up and very seldom, then they become part of the most hidden side of our minds. The dream is a way of processing and accumulating what happened during the day. At night, the brain digests and metaphorically filters information, and in my opinion, what the brain saves becomes part of who we are. Sleep is like the digestive system of the brain.

Perhaps many of the elements that appear in my works come from that hidden inner world and mix with the reality of everyday life to create compositions free of restrictions. Hence my influence with the surrealist movement. In my opinion the surrealist creative process starts from the pure psychic automatism to try to express, verbally, visually, or in any other way, the functioning of reality. Surrealism is not a technique, nor a school; it is a way of seeing and understanding reality, or how to understand the reality of the dream come true.

SH: What do you think the role of artists is in society? How does other artwork inform how you move through life?
DK: Art has many connotations for each person, each person has different tastes in the sense that each individual considers art different things. Art is influential depending on the point at which the artist wants the audience to understand his work and at the same time the public is interested in art if it is done in the context in which it lives. By combining these two parts, art can be influential, sometimes it can make people think, sometimes these people can stop to look at what they see and others directly and not flinch.

Speaking of my art, I do not pretend to act as an activist and show people the errors or natural disasters that we are causing, I simply want to offer images that make us think and reflect on the reality of our days. I like to work on antagonistic concepts, frustrated ideals or colorful nightmares, which find their meaning when the viewer feels sensations when observing them.

SH: If your body of work inspired an ice cream flavor, what would it be called and what are the ingredients?
DK: It would be a combination of vanilla and bitter dark chocolate. At first glance we are faced with a sweet and appetizing taste that invites you to savor the work from the beginning to the end but once seduces us and we enter into your body the hidden message represents the reality of the characters who are threatened, many times injured and others directly extinct, form scenes full of sarcasm. I try to capture the viewer with a pleasing palette in sight and organic forms, to later immerse him in a tragic realism hidden in an ideal world. Love and hatred are recurrent in these works beautiful in form and terrible in the background.

SH: You’ve painted murals around the world? Can you share with us a memorable moment from one of those journeys?
DK: One of the places I remember most is Churchill, Canada. Churchill is a city on the west coast of Hudson Bay in the province of Manitoba, which is famous for the many polar bears that come from its seas from the hinterland in the fall, so it is called the “polar bear capital of the world”. It is also very famous for the amount of beluga whales that come in the summer to mate. It is a totally remote place that I wanted to travel to take photographs some years ago, it was one of those places that I wanted to visit as a source of inspiration for my work, but when I saw the flight ticket prices from Spain I discovered that it was very  expensive and I decided to leave it for later.

Coincidences of life, two years ago, at the end of 2016, I received an email from Tré Packard, (organizer of Seawalls and Pangeaseed director) told me that he was organizing a mural festival in Churchill for the summer of 2017. Tré warned me that, given the circumstances of the place, it was going to be a totally different festival than what I was used to. Apart from being a place that can only be reached by light plane or train, during those dates there were floods that destroyed the train tracks so it was only reached by plane. All the materials to paint, as well as the food came in the small plane with us, we loaded the provisions ourselves. We had a couple of lifts for about 12 artists which we took turns according to needs and very little painting. I’ve been in too many festivals but the circle of friendship that was created in this place was pure magic.

Painting in the cold night in summer observing the boreal aura or listening to the whales screaming and watching them flutter while I was on top of my scaffolding were some of the things that I lived there. They joined my two passions, nature and art in its purest form to spend 15 unforgettable days. When things come up with a purpose like this, a festival does not need anything else, it does not matter if there is little painting or few means, friendship and experience is what counts and that at the end of the day is what you remember on your return to home.

SH: Who is an artist; musician, director, any art form – who would be a dream collaboration for you and what would you create?
DK: I love the cinema and especially the stop motion animation. One of the collaborations that I would most enjoy would be to work in a film production of this type with the the dutch painter Hieronymus Bosch, obviously this is impossible but we were talking about dreams.

SH: Is there a particular piece in this exhibition you feel really challenged you? If so, why and what makes you proud of this piece?
DK: The piece “Carousel” was perhaps the most complicated to finish. After two weeks working on it in detail I applied glazing techniques to enhance the effect of water in the underwater area by covering it all with bluish veiling. I had never worked a piece in which most of the scene is submerged and also with a large size. At first it was very dark and I had to rescue zone by zone the effects of light and shadow to recover the strength and order of the elements of the scene in the areas where it needed  but it made me gain depth and improve the aquatic effect. In the end the problem made me look for a solution and greatly improve the final result.

 

SH: You used to work in advertising and animation as an artist while still developing your own creative and artistic voice. What advice would you give other artists who have the creative day-job that may leave them burned out at the end of the day to work on their own art?
DK: As you said I’ve worked in animation, illustration, fashion or advertising, meanwhile I have been developing my personal style and applying it to the different aspects. Today I have realized that what I really need is to work on the development of my work with a more artistic purpose.

Living from your own art is something complicated, it is something so passionate that it becomes a lifestyle and it is very difficult to separate your personal life of the professional. This is where many joys and sorrows come and you have to take the control. As a main point I would highlight the work and effort as a starting point, and from here to consider yourself because you dedicate yourself to this. I personally do it because there are things that have to come out from me, I have never thought why I do it, It simply comes because I need it, it is part of my personality and a mode of expression in silence.

Interview with Atsuko Goto for “Elysium”

We’re excited to have artist Atsuko Goto’s new body of work as part of our group exhibition Elysium. Goto pushes her hauntingly melancholic images and feather like details exploring various techniques found in Asian art. Our interview with Atsuko discusses her post-show plans, highs and lows of the creative process, and studio tools.

Join us for the opening for Elysium, Saturday, November 10th from 6 pm to 9 pm.

SH: What was the inspiration behind this latest body of work? What ideas or themes were you exploring?
AG: I am recently interested by painter’s point of view and mindset of the old time. Thinking of that, I drew some elements of old Asian artworks in my paintings, “Mischief of forgotten dreams” series.

SH: How do you approach developing a new body of work and capture ideas for pieces; do you have a sketchbook on hand or is it just a note to yourself in your phone?
AG: I often draw paintings watching photos on my PC. But I start to paint before deciding about the final result.

SH: What excites you about your work / creative process?
AG: When I try something new and I don’t know how it will progress.

SH: What frustrates you about your work / creative process?
AG: When I feel that I do always the same things.

SH: Is there a particular piece in this exhibition you feel really challenged you? If so, why and what makes you proud of this piece?
AG: “Mischief of forgotten dreams I,” When I started this painting, I really didn’t know what I should draw. So I greatly (for me )changed the process and I continued drawing without many thinking. I was uncertain but I also felt excited, because I didn’t know what will appear in my painting.

SH: Who is an artist; musician, director, any art form – who would be a dream collaboration for you and what would you create?
AG: I dream to collaborate with someone from different fields; writer, musician, player…I also dream to be involved with the stage play (theatre).

SH: Has there been someone or some event that has made a significant impact on you that lead you to where you are now? An artistic catalyst of sorts?
AG: There have been many people and many events impact on me.

SH: What’s in your toolbox? AKA what paints, brushes, tools would we find in your studio? What do you wish was in your studio?
AG: Pigments, natural pigments, brushes, Japanese ink, glue, Arabic gum and PC (photos, music, movies)…etc. I would like to have a chair that moves automatically into all directions.

SH: After a show what do you do? Do you take a long break, vacation, a particular ritual? Tell us.
AG: I try to take some break in order to think about nothing.

SH: In one or two words, tell us something that you really like or resonates with you about the work of each artist in Elysium.

AG: Their own unique world.

Interview with Lauren Brevner for “Menagerie”

Vancouver based artist Lauren Brevner is inspired by the rich culture of growing up with a mixed heritage. A self-taught artist, her mixed media compositions explore identity and self-acceptance, with stylistic elements of Japanese art and culture and reinventing the use of gold and silver leaf within her work. We’re excited to be showing Brevner’s latest body of work Menagerie in the Thinkspace Project room this month. In anticipation of the exhibition, our interview with Lauren Brevner explores her creative process, the foods she fell in love with in Osaka, New York, and her hometown along with the greatest lesson she learned from mentor Sin Nakayamal.

Join us for the opening of Menagerie Saturday, November 10th from 6 pm to 9 pm.

SH: What was the inspiration behind this latest body of work for Menagerie? What ideas or themes were you exploring?

LB: The term Menagerie is used to express my own experience as a female coming from a background of mixed heritage. I consider the portraits that I paint to be non-representational self-portraits. Each piece plays on the themes of captivity, assimilation, and seclusiveness, paired with visuals of exotic animals and patterns. I grew up with deep-rooted identity issues, the constant battle between seeking refuge within a racial group while still maintaining a true sense of self is something I think a lot of mixed race children battle. I wanted to represent these minorities as beautiful beings and portray them as strong, sensual and equal.

Kurobanai

SH: Who are the models in your pieces? Do you search for a particular look or does the model inspire the piece?

LB: Sometimes the models are real people but mostly they are an amalgamation of many different characters, pictures, and acquaintances I’ve encountered. I do have a Pinterest page where I gather images that usually spark an idea but most of the time the painting doesn’t end up looking like the reference I originally began with.

SH: Can you tell us about your apprenticeship with Sin Nakayamal? How did you acquire the apprenticeship? What is the greatest lesson you gained from the experience?

LB: I met Sin through Osaka’s version of craigslist. At the time, I was looking for a job as a barista and I found an ad that was looking for an intern at a multi-purpose cafe and gallery space. After I got the job and began working alongside Sin, I pretty much became his assistant. I helped him put together art shows, prepare for exhibitions, and just straight up make coffee. Looking back on it, the experience I gained was invaluable. Although I wasn’t learning how to paint, I was learning how to think like a creative and how to live an entrepreneurial lifestyle. The biggest thing I learned from him is that if you want to learn how to do something, don’t hesitate, just put yourself out there and try.

Ama

SH: How do you approach developing a new body of work and capture ideas for pieces; do you have a sketchbook on hand or is it just a note to yourself in your phone?

LB: The very preliminary stages of a show are both writing and image collection, basically a mood board. Whenever I have a thought relevant to what I’m doing I will jot it down in my notes app in order to slowly build up my ideas. I also have a sketch folder on Procreate with all my preliminary thumbnail ideas for the show. It’s hard to say where the idea for a show really comes from since it’s usually something that builds over time, however, I usually have one image that leads the show. This time around the first piece I created was ‘Kurobani’ which embodies most of what I was trying to say and therefore became my title piece.

SH: What excites you about your work / creative process?

LB: Currently, I’m really excited to learn more about my heritage and my experience as a person of mixed ethnicity. I want to be able to translate this into my work and hopefully, other people will feel this connection. Most of my work thus far has been a journey leading up to this point so I am excited to delve deeper into my own experiences and see what comes from it.

SH: What frustrates you about your work / creative process?

LB: Sometimes I wish I could just paint, the mixed media portion structure to my work that I would like to distance myself from sometimes. On the flip side I think it gives my work a very distinctive style but I can see myself transitioning to a more traditional approach in the years to come.

Amarna

SH: Is there a particular piece in this exhibition you feel really challenged you? If so, why and what makes you proud of this piece?

LB: The title piece Kurobani wasn’t necessarily the most challenging to paint but it was challenging to wrap my head around why I was painting it and what it meant to me. This is my first large portrait of a male, and more specifically the first portrait of someone with their back facing the viewer. I have always relied on the faces of my portraits to carry the emotional weight of whatever I was trying to convey in a piece so it was a challenge to create an emotive piece without showing his face. I’m very proud and happy with how this piece has turned out and I can see myself moving into a larger variety of compositions because of this in the near future. I’m proud of the fact that I was able to create something beautiful and different but also very meaningful to me.

SH: Who is an artist; musician, director, any art form – who would be a dream collaboration for you and what would you create?

LB: I would love the chance to collaborate with a fashion house specifically Gucci, Kenzo, Manish Aroura, Vivienne Westwood etc. A large majority of my inspiration comes from textiles and fashion culture so I would be very happy to see my work in conjunction with textiles or clothing design.

Maru

SH: What’s in your toolbox? AKA what paints, brushes, tools would we find in your studio? What do you wish was in your studio?

LB: SO MANY THINGS! Since I’m a mixed media artist you will find just about everything in my studio but my go-to materials are metal leaf, aqua size, brushes ( Windsor Newton for watercolor and anything that has a point for oil) Kroma paints if I’m using acrylics, a mixture of Windsor Newton, Holbein and Gamblin for oil, art resin, wooden panels, and sculpey, la doll and apoxie sculpt for sculpture. I miss sculpting and ceramics so I would love to install a kiln and an area for pottery in my studio!!

Sunflower

SH: After a show what do you do? Do you take a long break, vacation, a particular ritual? Tell us.

LB: I’m pretty exhausted after a show, and definitely the type that needs a break. This time I am traveling to Bali and Thailand for a month immediately after to get some serious R&R (although I will be painting a small mural out there!) My usual at home ritual is to switch mediums completely to fight off art block. It changes my perspective on my practice and gets me excited to create again (right now I’m playing around with quick gouache sketches for example)

SH: What is your favorite place to eat and what do you order in Osaka, New York, and Vancouver?

LB: I love to eat and try new restaurants so it’s always hard for me to pick one favorite. When I was in Osaka my host family always made delicious food but whatever Grandma was making was always my favorite. For New York, I would have to say this spot my brother took me to in midtown (though I can’t remember the name!) I love seafood and the grilled octopus salad there is to die for, pair that with their Lavender Grappa and you’re set!! In my hometown Vancouver one of my go-to’s is Guu the Japanese tapas style restaurant is a great place to grab a bite with friends. I usually order multiple items but don’t miss their daily feature as it never disappoints.

Interview with Lisa Ericson for “Border Crossing”

Thinkspace is pleased to present Border Crossing, featuring new works by Portland-based artist Lisa Ericson. Her meticulous rendered, hyperrealistic paintings are a wonderland where parasitical ecosystems are perched weightlessly on the backs of wildlife and the breathtaking details are a wonderland for the viewer. In anticipation of Border Crossing, our interview with Lisa Ericson discusses the exhibitions challenging work, reincarnation, and how she will be celebrating the completion of this new body of work.

Join us Saturday, October 13th from 6 pm to 9 pm for the opening reception of Border Crossing. 

SH: What is the inspiration behind the Border Crossing?

LE: A couple different ideas were swimming around together in my mind…migration, immigration, refugees, wildlife corridors. Often I intertwine human & animal inspiration so the final piece can be read as both a human tale or an animal one.

SH: How do you approach developing a new body of work?

LE: I don’t map out the entire thing from the start. I never have more than one or two pieces completely planned at a time. I start with an idea and put together images for the first couple of paintings, but leave space while I’m working on those pieces for the original idea branch out in my mind. One piece leads to the next and so on. I’ve learned to trust that.

SH: How do you capture ideas for pieces; do you have a sketchbook on hand or is it just a note to yourself in your phone?

LE: I don’t really work in a sketchbook. As ideas pop into my head, I jot them down or do tiny sketches on whatever piece of paper is handy. Bare bones stuff, but a kernel to start from. Later when I start putting together a composite image of a future painting, the idea either flies or dies. But even if it dies, often a new and better idea is born out of it. Some ideas come together quickly. Others I try repeatedly, but I can’t get them to work. Some of those eventually click and become paintings. Some are still just floating around in my head.

SH: What excites you and frustrates you about your work / creative process?

LE: This question makes me dive right down into my psyche and confront my best/worst qualities. The same thing excites and frustrates me about my process. I start every show at a glacial pace. The first couple paintings take ages to conceptualize and execute. But as the show date come closer and the pressure crystalizes the ideas in my head, I take less and less time from idea to finished piece, I work longer and longer hours until I end at an all-consuming frenzy. After every show, I make promises about pacing myself. I make time charts. But then I repeat the same pattern. Part of me realizes that the pressure is part of what makes me tick, and in some ways, I thrive on it and even enjoy it. But I still try to tell myself I’ll be different the next time around.

SH: Is there a particular piece in this exhibition you feel really challenged you? If so, why and what makes you proud of this piece?

LE: I made “Into the Dark” in response to the horror of the policy of separating children from their parents at the U.S. border. A mother lemur’s babies cling to her, the way a human child would, the way my own daughter clings to me. Often when I work, I get lost in the technical aspects of painting – the color, seeing the image take shape brushstroke by brushstroke – but this subject matter was a little raw for me and I felt emotional about it all the way through.

SH: If you were reincarnated as an animal, what do you think you’d come back as and why? Is that the same as what you would want to be reincarnated as?

LE: I think I’d be reincarnated as something wary and shy, and happy to stay in her burrow. No doubt why I do well as a painter, spending long periods of time alone in my studio. But I’d want to be reincarnated as a bird. Because, flight! I have an irrational fear of flying in planes. I still do it, but am always filled with anxiety about it. I’d love to be free of that.

SH: Who is an artist; musician, director, any art form – who would be a dream collaboration for you and what would you create? Maybe a muralist?

LE: I work on small, minutely detailed paintings, but I love murals and art in the public space of all kinds. I’d love to see something of mine in a huge format on a wall or side of a building.

SH: Favorite way to celebrate the completion of a project/body of work.

LE: First, sleep. Oh, glorious sleep. Then I let friends know that I’m once again available to have a social life (because no doubt I’ve been in studio lockdown for months). I catch up on life. I clean my studio (and then find it sterile and empty and must make it messy again). It’s all a cycle!

Interview with Josh Keyes for “The Tempest”

The powerful work of Josh Keyes demand pause. His hyperrealistic paintings have captured a metaphorical idea of what our not so distant future would reflect which graphically straddles the line of science-fiction, fantasy, or merely a grim prediction of the path our civilization is on today.  In our previous interviews with Keyes for his first print drop with Thinkspace (1) and his show last year Implosion (2), we explored a lot about how Keyes has developed as an artist up until now, in our interview with Josh Keyes in anticipation for the Tempest we continue to explore the evolution of his creative process and a few reflections on his relationship to time.

Join us for the opening reception of  Tempest this Saturday, October 13th from 6 pm to 9 pm.

SH: What is the inspiration behind the Tempest?

JK: These images emerged from three different sources, all having a common foundation in their emotional resonance. The three sources were political, environmental, and personal.

The political climate is unbearable and most often unbelievable. Initially, I wanted to make paintings about Trump in purgatory, maybe strolling around in his underwear. But after googling his face so many times for reference, I felt ill. Environmental concerns are always present in my work and lately, some of the images I have seen in the news around the world are as bizarre as any post-apocalyptic scenario. From a personal standpoint, being a parent with a daughter has heightened my concern for a sustainable future, and to support and help empower the women in my family and community. One way to address the tortuous landscape unfolding in America is through Myth, dream, and metaphor. I did not want to create literal depiction, , but rather strive to create images that occupy symbolic, lyrical and poetic expression.

SH: How do you approach developing a new body of work?

JK: The only way I can describe my process for developing new ideas is like dreaming with open eyes. I go through a lot of wacky imagery before arriving at a handful of what I feel are illuminating and self-transformative images.

SH: How do you capture ideas for pieces; do you have a sketchbook on hand or is it just a note to yourself in your phone?

JK: I work with many reference images, my sketchbook is mostly filled with writing, single word ideas or concepts.

SH: What excites you and frustrates you about your work / creative process?

JK: I suppose I wish I had more time, I have so many ideas that I would like to paint, sometimes I wonder if I should have been a filmmaker since so many of the images in my mind constantly move.

SH: Is there a particular piece in this exhibition you feel really challenged you? If so, why and what makes you proud of this piece?

JK: Siren speaks to all of these ideas on a couple levels. The statue of the angel, standing against the oncoming storm, slowly engulfed by waves, sounds a trumpet. Is it a siren? and alarm, or is it a call for help? Is it a call for environmental or political action? She stands alone, will she ever be heard. The testimony and stories of so many women who have been abused makes me rage. I see this woman in the water as a beacon, a lighthouse, a call to humanity, and the storm moving in, the shadow of the dark side of masculinity, the shadow, that for many men is their guiding light.

SH: Who is an artist; musician, director, any art form – who would be a dream collaboration for you and what would you create?

JK: I tend to think of my paintings like cinematic moments from a film, what film I don’t know, there are so many incredible filmmakers out there. Maybe working with a filmmaker would open up a new way of expressing this imagery. To be honest, some of the more recent paintings feel like perfume or cologne commercials to me. You know the ones that are over the top with a surreal environment, and then just a whisper, “Tempest, for men”

SH: Has there been someone or some event that has made a significant impact on you that lead you to where you are now? An artistic catalyst of sorts?

JK: I seem to always go back to a performance art professor I had at the Chicago Art Institute, Lynn Book. Her unique view of the world and how we perceive the world broke me apart and allowing me to rebuild the world in a way that made sense to me.

SH: You have a time machine, and you could do anything / go anywhere for 24 hours, and would not interfere with the space-time continuum. What would you do?

JK: My kneejerk reaction would be to go back and catch Trump doing something naughty. But if I could not interfere or change the event, like, you know, why in hell would I go back in time to observe that rascal. I suppose parenting has made me interested in how my own parents raised me, why I am such a freak. I would go back in time and observe my parents when they were raising me and my sister, and perhaps understand, empathize, and forgive many of the choices they made, as very young parents. I am not suggesting they were bad parents, but I am amazed at how much parenting has changed since the 1970’s!

SH: Favorite way to celebrate the completion of a project/body of work.

JK: Keep on making, I see it as a continuation, like a wiggly string of dreams.

SH: If you could be a character in any movie for a day; who would you be in what film and why?

JK: Father Karras from the Exorcist. There are times when I wrestle with my own shadow and demons. For me, this conflict or collision is often an area where aesthetic inspiration comes from. Personifying fear or transforming it into a symbol or form is one way of working with and through the experience. I suppose the difference for me is, the shadow or demon is never truly exorcized and abolished, it is part of the self and has to be regulated and integrated in a healthy way, a restoration of inner balance.