VITALITY AND VERVE III at the Long Beach Museum of Art

 
VITALITY AND VERVE III
at the Long Beach Museum of Art‘Art After Dark’ Opening Reception: Friday, June 29, 2018
On View June 30, 2018 thru September 9, 2018 at:Long Beach Museum of Art
2300 East Ocean Boulevard
Long Beach, CA. 90803Friday, June 29 opening night gala tickets available soon:
www.lbma.orgClick HERE to join the Facebook event.

Featuring ephemeral murals and installations from:
Bordalo II, CASE, Evoca1, Sergio Garcia, Herakut, Hush,
Jaune, Leon Keer, Koz Dos, Spenser Little, Fintan Magee,
Dennis McNett, Drew Merritt, Michael Reeder, RISK, SEEN,
Amy Sol, Super A, Juan Travieso, Dan Witz and Lauren YS

The Long Beach Museum of Art (LBMA) presents Vitality and Verve III, an exhibition dedicated to showcasing new works by artists of the New Contemporary Art Movement. Presented in curatorial collaboration with Los Angeles’ Thinkspace Projects and the support of POW! WOW! Long Beach, the exhibition is the third iteration in the collaborative series which has secured record-breaking public attendance since 2015.

Vitality and Verve III will present a relevant cross-section of some of the most exciting artists working under the New Contemporary handle today and will feature site-specific works by these 21 individuals brought together in the same space for the first time. Their impermanent installations are tangentially activated, transforming the ground floor and Ocean View gallery of the LBMA into an immersive ephemeral playground for the senses.

The exhibition will feature new, site-specific works by internationally renowned artists, Bordalo II, CASE, Evoca1, Sergio Garcia, Herakut, Hush, Jaune, Leon Keer, Koz Dos, Spenser Little, Fintan Magee, Dennis McNett, Drew Merritt, Michael Reeder, RISK, SEEN, Amy Sol, Super A, Juan Travieso, Dan Witz and Lauren YS. Each will contribute a unique piece and vantage point, working across a variety of media.

The New Contemporary Art Movement is known for its diversity; several styles, media, contexts, and exhibition platforms fall within its expansive cast, including public art interventions and site-specific urban murals. This breadth has long been embraced as a subversive impulse vis-a-vis the more exclusionary and contained tenets of contemporary art production, particularly those minted in academe and aspiring to the vetted legitimacy of the ‘white cube.’ The movement’s vested interest in incorporating the social and representational, counter to its often systemic disavowal, has allowed it to thrive outside of institutional support, though this exclusionary paradigm is rapidly shifting.

Largely self-supported and community-driven since the 90’s, many of the movement’s artists are self-taught or have come into their own through multi-disciplinary backgrounds. Gaining international recognition over the past decade, the movement is now widely recognized as both the largest and longest running organized art movement in history, boasting veterans and established artists as well as emergent ones. The evocative potential of representation inspires these artists to draw from popular and countercultural sources like music, illustration, comics, graffiti, design, punk, tattoo culture, hip-hop, skate culture, etc., looking to the outside world rather than to the self-referential gestures that have typified the traditional exclusions of contemporary art.

 

Long Beach Museum of Art hours and admission:
Thursday: 11AM to 8PM
Friday – Sunday: 11AM to 5PM
$7 adult admission / $6 seniors (over age 62) and students with Valid I.D.
Free for museum members and children under 12

**FREE ADMISSION after 3PM on Thursdays and ALL DAY on Fridays**
__________________________________________________

About the LBMA:
The Long Beach Museum of Art (LBMA) was founded in 1950 as a municipal art center for the city of Long Beach. Since its inception, the Museum has been housed in the historic 1911 Elizabeth Milbank Anderson House. In 1957, the Anderson House was designated as the Long Beach Museum of Art, at which time the Museum began acquiring a permanent collection.

In 1977, the Museum was honored with accreditation by the American Association of Museums, which it has since maintained. Since 1986, the Long Beach Museum of Art Foundation has managed the Museum, governed by a Board of Trustees. In 2000, the Museum completed a restoration of the historic residence and constructed a new two-story exhibition pavilion (in 2015 the pavilion was renamed the Hartman Pavilion). Since then, the Museum has offered diverse and compelling exhibitions, which has resulted in increased visitors and program attendance.

The Museum’s permanent collection is diverse with more than 3,200 works encompassing 300 years of American and European art in all media. Highlights from the collection include furniture by Charles and Ray Eames, ceramics by Beatrice Wood, and sculptures by Claire Falkenstein, George Rickney and Peter Voulokos; Early 20th Century European Modernist paintings by Vasily Kandinsky, Alexej Jawlensky and others from the Milton Wichner Collection; and contemporary artists such as James Jean, Sherrie Wolf, and Sandow Birk whose paintings have recently been added to the collection.

About POW! WOW! Long Beach:
POW! – It’s the impact that art has on a person.

WOW! – It’s the reaction that art has on a viewer.

Together they form POW! WOW!, which is a Native American term that describes a gathering that celebrates culture, music and art.

Centered around a week-long event in Hawaii, POW! WOW! has grown into a global network of artists and organizes gallery shows, lecture series, schools for art and music, creative community spaces, concerts, and live art installations across the globe. The central event takes place during Valentine’s Day week in February in the Kaka’ako district of Honolulu, and brings over a hundred international and local artist together to create murals and other forms of art. The festival is expanding to cities and countries such as Long Beach, Taiwan, Israel, Singapore, Jamaica, Washington D.C., Guam, New Zealand, Germany and many more.

About Thinkspace:

Thinkspace was founded in 2005; now in LA’s Culver City Arts District, the gallery has garnered an international reputation as one of the most active and productive exponents of the New Contemporary Art Movement. Maintaining its founding commitment to the promotion and support of its artists, Thinkspace has steadily expanded its roster and diversified its projects, creating collaborative and institutional opportunities all over the world. Founded in the spirit of forging recognition for young, emerging, and lesser-known talents, the gallery is now home to artists from all over the world, ranging from the emerging, mid-career, and established.

The New Contemporary Art Movement, not unlike its earlier 20th Century counterparts like Surrealism, Dada, or Fauvism, ultimately materialized in search of new forms, content, and expressions that cited rather than disavowed the individual and the social. The earliest incarnations of the Movement, refusing the paradigmatic disinterest of “Art” as an inaccessible garrison of ‘high culture’, championed figuration, surrealism, representation, pop culture, and the subcultural. By incorporating the ‘lowbrow,’ accessible, and even profane, an exciting and irreverent art movement grew in defiance of the mandated renunciations of “high” art. Emerging on the West Coast in the 90’s partly as a response to the rabid ‘conceptual-turn’ then championed on the East Coasts, the Movement steadily created its own platforms, publications, and spaces for the dissemination of its imagery and ideas.

Though the New Contemporary Art Movement has remained largely unacknowledged by the vetted institutions of the fine art world and its arbiters of ‘high culture,’ the future promises a shift. The Movement’s formative aversion to the establishment is also waning in the wake of its increased visibility, institutional presence, and widespread popularity.

Thinkspace has sought to champion and promote the unique breadth of the Movement, creating new opportunities for the presentation of its artists and work. Though still very much invested in the elevation and exposure of its emerging talents, the gallery, now in its 13th year, has come into its own with a roster that reflects this maturity. An active advocate for what is now one of the longest extant organized art movement’s in history, Thinkspace is an established voice for its continued growth and evolution.

The gallery has in recent years expanded its projects beyond Los Angeles, exhibiting with partner galleries and organizations in Berlin, Hong Kong, London, New York City, Detroit, Chicago, and Honolulu among many others, participating in International Art Fairs, and curating New Contemporary content for Museums. Committed to the vision, risk, and exceptional gifts of its artists, the gallery is first and foremost a family. From the streets to the museums, and from the “margins” to the white cube, Thinkspace is re-envisioning what it means to be “institutional.”

Robert William’s “SLANG AESTHETICS!” Opens at LSU Museum of Art

Robert Williams: Slang Aesthetics! visits Louisiana with the opening of it’s latest showing this Thursday, March 8th, at the LSU Museum of Art. The exhibition will be on view throughout the spring and summer, closing June 17th.

Here is what the museum had to say about its upcoming exhibition:

Presented courtesy of the artist, Thinkspace Gallery, and Josef Zimmerman, Robert Williams: Slang Aesthetics showcases 25 new oil paintings and ephemera by the artist upheld as the godfather of the lowbrow and pop surrealist art movements. A true maverick who sought to create work that channeled the shifting energies and immediacy of counterculture, from the 1960s onward, Williams’ paintings invoked a return to craftsmanship, figuration and popular imagery that rejected the elitist tenets of conceptual minimalism.

ICY & SOT’s HUMAN (NATURE) OPENING AT FULLERTON MUSEUM CENTER

Icy & Sot continue to produce thought-provoking work that reflects the troubles of our times in a new series of public works created as a response to the travel-ban in the US.  Juxtapoz highlights the work as a continued departure from their classic stencil based pieces, which was first seen at the opening of Human (Nature) in November 2017 at our gallery.

We are excited to announce that pieces from Human (Nature) will be shown at the Fullerton Museum Center, with an opening reception tomorrow, Friday, January 26th.

We look forward to introducing Icy & Sot’s Human (Nature) to a new audience in Orange County.

ICY and SOT
Human (Nature)

Curated by Thinkspace

On view Jan 27 – March 18
Opening Reception: 6-9PM

Fullerton Museum Center
301 N. Pomona Avenue
Fullerton, CA 92832
Phone (714)738-6545
http://ci.fullerton.ca.us/museum/

POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Movement – 2018

‘POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Movement’
Curated by Thinkspace

Taking place at the Honolulu Museum Of Art School as part of this year’s POW! WOW! Hawaii Mural Festival.

On view February 3 through February 24 with an opening reception on Sunday, February 11 from 5-9PM with all of this year’s POW! WOW! artists attending. Come celebrate with us!!!

Honolulu Museum of Art School
1111 Victoria Street
Honolulu, HI 96814
*Across the street from the main museum

For the fifth iteration of Thinkspace’s special exhibition in tandem with POW! WOW! Hawai’i, we have curated a group of just over 50 local and international artists to act as a small survey of the burgeoning New Contemporary Art Movement for art lovers on Oahu and the world over via social networks like Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

“With roots firmly planted in illustration, pop culture, comics, street art, and graffiti, put quite simply the New Contemporary Art Movement is art for the people,” – Thinkspace co-founder Andrew Hosner

Featuring 2×2 foot (24×24 inch / 60x60cm) works from:
Adam Caldwell
Alex Yanes
Alvaro Naddeo
Andrew Schoultz
Anthony Ausgang
Anthony Clarkson
Bezt
Bordalo II
Brooks Salzwedel
Carl Cashman
Case
Casey Weldon
Christopher Konecki
Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker
Dalek (aka James Marshall)
Dan Witz
DotDotDot
Drew Merritt
Dulk
Fernando Chamarelli
Frank Gonzales
Germs
Ghostbeard
Henrik Aa. Uldalen
Hyuro
Icy and Sot
James Bullough
Jasper Wong
Jaune
Jeff Gress
Jeremy Fish
Jolene Lai
Joram Roukes
Jose Mertz
Kaili Smith
Kaplan Bunce
KiSung Koh
Koz Dos
Laurence Vallieres
Martin Whatson
Matthew Crumpton
Meggs
Mwanel Pierre-Louis
Nicolas Romero (aka Ever)
OakOak
Patch Whiskey
Sandra Chevrier
Sean Mahan
Sergio Garcia
Seth Armstrong
Skewville
Spenser Little
Stella Im Hultberg
Super A
Teagan White
Telmo Miel
Tran Nguyen
Woes
Zezao

Taking place during POW! WOW! Hawaii 2018

For full details:
www.PowWowHawaii.com

 Jeremy Fish ‘The Los Angelurkers’ mini solo show in Foyer Gallery at Fullerton Museum Center

 Jeremy Fish
‘The Los Angelurkers’
Mini solo show in Foyer Gallery
Curated by Thinkspace

Taking Place At:
Fullerton Museum Center
310 N. Pomona Avenue
Fullerton, CA 92832
Phone: 714.738.6545
http://ci.fullerton.ca.us/museum/

Opening Reception: Saturday, July 29th from 6-9PM
On view: July 29th through September 10th

The Fullerton Museum Center in conjunction with Thinkspace are happy to present a small showcase featuring the works of the phenomenally influential Jeremy Fish.

Fish, originally from Albany New York, moved to San Francisco in the 90’s to set up camp at the age of 19 in North Cali’s skate mecca, eventually studying screen-printing and painting, and completing a degree at the Art Institute of San Francisco. He went on to work commercially as an illustrator, designer, and art director, contributing to apparel companies and magazines like DLX, Think, Thrasher, Juxtapoz, and Slap.

Inspired by children’s books and cartoons from the 70s and skateboard graphics from the 80s and 90s, Jeremy Fish’s world is both playful and dark, inhabited by animals, phenomenal graphic motifs, cool cars, and classic vans. He creates a whole cast of animal characters inspired by the cities and scenes he loves and the personal and human conflicts he observes. In 2015 Fish became San Francisco’s City Hall’s first-ever artist in residence, creating a body of work based on the iconic city he has called home since 1994. In celebration of its centennial, he created 100 pieces of mixed-media drawing based on San Francisco’s urban history and its civic hub, which were exhibited in a special project in the fall of 2015 entitled, O Glorious City. If that wasn’t enough, the city further showed their thanks for Fish by proclaiming November 19th to be “Jeremy Fish Day” from here on out. In this new body of work, The Los Angelurkers is a return to a more lighthearted Fish as he celebrates everything he loves about Los Angeles, in spite of his steadfast North Cali allegiances. In an attempt to cut out any unnecessary negativity from his life, following his recovery from a serious brain aneurysm in 2014, Fish has spent most of the past year hunting down this imaginative world of mythical creatures from the recesses of his ingeniously offbeat mind, revealing a cool and playful world of fantasy and nostalgia.