This August at the Lancaster MOAH : The New Vangaurd curated by Thinkspace

The New Vangaurd

The New Vanguard
Curated by Thinkspace / taking place at the Lancaster MOAH
August 13 – October 30, 2016

The Lancaster Museum of Art and History, in collaboration with Los Angeles’ Thinkspace Gallery, is pleased to present The New Vanguard, featuring works by over 55 artists from the New Contemporary Movement. The exhibition will present one of the largest cross-sections of artists working within the movement’s diverse vernaculars, ever shown within a museological context in California to date. An ambitious compilation, The New Vanguard will bring together some of the most relevant and dynamic artists currently practicing from all over the world. The exhibition, opening August 13, will take place in tandem with this year’s installment of POW! WOW! Antelope Valley.

The exhibition will feature site-specific murals and installations within the museum by Alex Yanes, Bumblebeelovesyou, Meggs, and Yoskay Yamamoto, a solo presentation of works by Scott Listfield in the Vault Gallery, and a diverse group exhibition of works in the South Gallery, including pieces by Aaron Li-Hill, Adam Caldwell, Alex Garant, Amandalynn, Amy Sol, Brett Amory, Brian Viveros, C215, Carl Cashman, Casey Weldon, Chie Yoshii, Cinta Vidal, Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker, Cryptik, Dan Lydersen, Dan-ah Kim, Derek Gores, Dulk, Erik Siador, Felipe Pantone, Fernando Chamarelli, Glennray Tutor, Henrik Aa. Uldalen, Icy and Sot, Jacub Gagnon, Jaime Molina, James Bullough, James Reka, Jana & JS, Jean Labourdette (aka Turf One), Jeremy Hush, Joel Daniel Phillips, Josie Morway, Juan Travieso, Kyle Stewart, Linnea Strid, Lisa Ericson, Low Bros, Lunar New Year, Mando Marie, Marco Mazzoni, Mark Dean Veca, Mark Warren Jacques, Martin Whatson, Mary Iverson, Matt Linares, Matthew Grabelsky, Meggs, Mike Egan, Nosego, Pam Glew, Ricky Lee Gordon, Scott Radke, Sean Norvet, Tony Philipppou, Wiley Wallace, X-O, and Yosuke Ueno.

The POW! WOW! Antelope Valley project will include public works by Amandalynn, Andrew Schoultz, Bumblebeelovesyou, David Flores, Julius Eastman, Kris Holladay, Mando Marie, Mark Dean Veca, Meggs, Michael Jones and Yoskay Yamamoto. All the works will be centered around the area of the museum, with David Flores actually adorning the backside of the museum with a massive new mural.

Historically, the New Contemporary movement has largely been relegated to spaces outside of art institutions and other arbiters of the “high,” whether it be urban spaces or subcultural haunts. The movement, having had to create contexts for the reception of its work and support of its community, has never had the fixity of a singular genre – or its limitations for that matter – but rather has prospered under a fluidity, expanding into all manner of techniques, expressions, media, and spaces. This exhibition is significant in that it marks a period of transition in the vetted visibility of this movement and its artists, as it has become increasingly celebrated and acknowledged, not only within the context of popular culture but the institutional framework of museum spaces. No single art movement in recent memory has grown as exponentially in acceptance, visibility, and popularity in as relatively short a period, a phenomenon that attests to the power and sway of its cultural presence.

Perhaps most unified by its lack of stylistic exclusion, the New Contemporary movement, long helmed by its simultaneous embrace of multiple elements, incorporates narrative, the surreal, the gestural, the abstract, the figurative, and the illustrative. With no single defining formal or conceptual armature, the work produced by this new generation of artist is responsive, reactive, emotive, and grounded in the social. The New Vanguard highlights the imaginative breadth of these New Contemporary artists, showcasing the limitless potential of an art movement that began without walls and has now infiltrated galleries and museums the world over.

The Lancaster Museum of Art and History is dedicated to strengthening awareness, enhancing accessibility and igniting the appreciation of art, history and culture in the Antelope Valley through dynamic exhibitions, innovative educational programs, creative community engagement and a vibrant collection that celebrates the richness of the region.

For tickets and further details please check www.lancastermoah.org

Telmo Miel ‘Lost and Found’ at the Fullerton Museum Center

Telo Miel Fullerton Museum

The Fullerton Museum and the Dutch Consulate present:

TELMO MIEL

‘Lost and Found’

Showcasing a new mural within the museum alongside six new works on linen

Curated by Thinkspace Gallery

Opening Reception: Thursday, July 21 5-7PM

Two weeks from today, The Fullerton Museum Center in conjunction with the Dutch Consulate and Thinkspace are happy to present a small showcase featuring the works of artistic duo Telmo Miel.

Telmo Miel are a muralist and image-making duo from the Netherlands, Telmo Miel is Telmo Pieper and Miel Krutzmann. They have worked together since meeting at the Willem de Kooning Academy in Rotterdam in 2007, officially becoming Telmo Miel in 2012. Their murals are both surreal and realistically rendered, with a tremendous amount of detail and vibrant color. Able to work fairly seamlessly, their styles have combined to such an extent that they’re able to execute multiple areas in tandem, exchanging places and completing each other’s work. They often execute their pieces on a monumental scale, creating huge architecturally sized spray-paint paintings on building façades. Combining multiple elements in a single composition, they layer references to the human and animal worlds to create complex creatures and fantastic scenarios. With positivity, humor and a touch of the romantic, their work is arresting and epic.

July 21st through September 25th, 2016

Taking Place At:
Fullerton Museum Center
310 N. Pomona Avenue
Fullerton, CA 92832

http://ci.fullerton.ca.us/museum/

POW! WOW! Long Beach 2016 Around The Corner

The following is pulled from POW! WOW!’s blog discussing Pow! Wow! Long Beach. The Long Beach Museum of Art is already starting to be transformed by the installation artist, and you can get a peak of it on Thinkspace Gallery’s snapchat, username: thinkspace_art. We hope you’re just as excited for this year’s Pow! Wow! Long Beach as we are! 

All photos by Brian Addison.

POW WOW LONG BEACH

Tristan Eaton painting his mural on the Varden Hotel.

Pow! Wow! Long Beach returns this year with a new assortment of artists to paint the walls of Long Beach in the name of spectacular, free art that is accessible by the public and ephemeral in the hands of time.

Six years ago in the warehouse-filled Kaka’ako district of Honolulu, a young Jasper Wong saw an incredible opportunity to create a spectacle that harkened more to the power of humans rather than the excessiveness of human partying.

Coachella he was not seeking. EDC? Absolutely not. He was creating what would soon become a phenomenon that the art world could not ignore. This is Pow! Wow!—and last year, the famed art collective made its first stamp on Long Beach.

Eschewing hipster antics—those popularity-contest-driven events where the partying is slowly eclipsing the art—Wong wanted to bring together his beyond cool friends as “an excuse to make an area better with art.”

We are talking talented street artists that are beyond respected in their own right, from James Jean to Ekundayo, Wu Yue to Will Barras. The result of his “excuse”? Massive mural after mural that has now created a public, outdoor collection of the some of the world’s finest street art, with some walls oftentimes altering year after year. Last year’s Pow! Wow! in Hawaii? It brought over 100 artists the U.K., Germany, Egypt, Israel, Mexico, Lithuania, and the States.

And last year’s event in Long Beach? It turned, in the words of some, DTLB into one of SoCal’s finest outdoor museums, etching names James Jean, Tristan Eaton, Nychos, Cryptic, Fafi, Low Bros, Jeff Soto and more to the streets of Long Beach. On walls. For the public to explore.

POW WOW LONG BEACH

Assistants help create Fafi’s piece on 4th between Elm and Linden; it has since been removed and is stored at interTrend Communications.

“Every year, every time, we tell ourselves that we are gonna scale it a bit back—y’know, it’s not easy managing all these artists taking on all these massive walls“ Wong said. “But each year we grew substantially—including to other cities [such as Taiwan, Singapore, and D.C.] has become a different kind of beast altogether.”

The ultimate point of Pow! Wow! is simple: create a global artist collective that seeks to alter the public landscape by providing the world’s leading street artists the largest canvases possible—the walls of buildings—while bringing together creative spirits in a way that is otherwise not possible. It has additionally brought forward musicians, photographers, and videographers to bring their own artistic flair to the event as it has expanded over the years.

POW WOW LONG BEACH

This year’s dais includes a plethora of the world’s finest street, graphic, and traditional artists (including Long Beach’s own Yoskay Yamamoto and David Van Patten as well as Long Beach-connected Andrew Hem) and, more impressively, a wonderful array of women and duos.

Aaron Li-Hill: This Toronto native was raised in California but lives in New York and has ancestry in China—making his art one that is culturally captivating and wonderfully hypnotic. Li-Hill has an obsessed with “arresting motion,” where birds are halted mid-flight and creatures stare directly into your eyes.

Brendan Monroe: Monroe hails from Oakland and he isn’t just a painter… Sculptor, illustrator, and husband, Monroe’s interpretations of the world are rooted in science then executed through painting and sculpting.

Andrew Hem: The child of Cambodian immigrants, Hem is no stranger to Long Beach—or the horrors that his parents experienced under the Khmer Rouge. His works are somber, their temperatures cool—as if Hem’s environments are perpetually viewed through a blue lens—and incredibly engaging.

Cinta Vidal Agulló: Based in Barcelona, her work plays with geometry and architecture in a way reminiscent of M.C. Escher but with a colorful and playful quality that makes her definitively unique.

David Van Patten: This famed Long Beach artist’s work is prolific. He demonstrates visuals ranging from dreamlike absurdism, psychedelic surrealism, childlike-storybook simplicity, ethical fables, to disturbingly dark humor—and you can find his work on everything from album covers to cider bottles to art galleries.

DEFER: One of LA’s most respected graffiti artists since the 1980s. Leading the way for future writers, DEFER’s letter-forms create beautifully complex, pattern-like expanses where street meets fine art.

Edwin Ushiro: This Maui-born, California-raised artist attended the Art Center College of Design and attained a BFA in Illustration. His work, almost always revolving around hypnotic female figures, bounces between graphic-like design and the images of Hawaiian charm and color.

Ernest Zacharevic: Zacharevic is that artist where medium comes into question, where his work provokes not just philosophical questions about the state of the world but basic art questions like, “Is that a painting or a sculpture?” Whether its a barrel of monkeys (with a physical barrel embedded into the wall of the mural) or two children racing in shopping carts (where, once again, physical shopping carts are embedded into the wall), Zacharevic is as humorous as he is challenging.

Felipe Pantone: Straddling the line between graphical and hand-drawn, typography and graffiti, Felipe’s work “draws on our concerns of the digital age and the speed at which technology is developing, like looking several light years ahead into the future and discovering a new language in which to communicate.”

Gail Werner: Werner’s work reflects the landscape and cultural imagery related to her Native American background. Her tribal affiliation is with the Cupeño, Luiseño, and Kumeyaay tribes located in southern California. Many of the elements found in her work such as color, light, and plant and animal life are influenced by the southern California desert and mountain landscape.

HITOTZUKI: The collaborative name of husband’n’wife team Kami and Sasu, where Kami’s free-flow wavey composition is juxtaposed (and incorporated into) Sasu’s eerily perfected geometric shapes.

Hula: This Hawaii-grown artist is now based in New York. Self-taught, he travels the world creating paintings which capture the emotions and interactions between the figures and their environment. With each piece, Hula merges his backgrounds in both street and fine art.

Jaime Molina: Molina is an artist based in Denver, Colorado. He makes mixed-media paintings, sculptures and murals that often display a folk art influence. This artist is a multi-talented professional whose aesthetic is well-defined and evokes a ruminative yet dynamic atmosphere.

Kaplan Bunce: Artist, wood-maker and the 2015 President of the Kaua’i Powwow Council in Kauai. Boom.

KASHINK: Following in the footsteps of Fafi, the other French street artist who appeared in last year’s event in Long Beach, KASHINK paints huge four eyed characters (all male, usually hairy’n’fat), with thick lines, vivid colors, in a very distinctive style–all while wearing a fake mustache.

OG Slick: Slick is one of the most respected street artists on the West, from the streets of Honolulu to Los Angeles since the mid 1980s. And we’re not just talking graffiti; we’re talking murals, sneaker design, typography, video games…

OG23: Combining nearly a decades worth of painting experience, Melbourne artist OG23, is finally dipping his paint covered feet into the professional art world. Fusing precise visual connections, a multifaceted colour palette and design heavy aesthetics, OG23’s work welds an array of influences to produce a body of work, completely of his own.

Pantónio: Hailing from the Azores Islands of Portugal, he describes his work as “the intuitive drawing movement and fluidity between elements.” Animals, interweaving elements, and high contrasts define his aesthetic.

Sarah Joncas: This Canadian artist has garnered a name for herself by skipping animation (where she started) and joining the forces of the fine arts, creating images that harness the power of femininity and street smarts.

Sket One: Sket is no stranger to Long Beach; you can find murals of his in both the East Village in DTLB and on the front-facing wall of Fine Feathers Kombucha Co. along Long Beach Blvd. at 23rd. Playful, clean, and distinct, his obsessed with toys and fantasies always comes to life in his murals.

Telmo Miel: Netherlanders Telmo Pieper and Miel Krutzmann are the duo behind Telmo Miel, both of whom create realistic, giant murals with nothing but spray paint. Whether its blow-up pink flamingos or beautiful children, Telmo Miel’s mass-scale murals are captivating.

Yoskay Yamamoto: This Japanese-turned-Long Beach native ventured to the US at the age of 15, teaching himself the art of illustration while falling for the urban life of the West Coast. Call his work Japanese American urban pop art.

For more information, visit www.powwowlongbeach.com

All photos and copy are ©2016 Downtown Long Beach Associates unless otherwise stated. For inquiries regarding use of photos or copy, email info@dlba.org

URBAN NATION Berlin : Museum for Urban Contemporary Art

Berlin Museum Urban Nation

Andrew Hosner, Thinkspace Gallery co-owner and curator, has been actively woking on the URBAN NATION MUSEUM FOR URBAN CONTEMPORARY ART as part of the curatorial committee and the collectors committee.

The launch of the project kicked off on May 19th, 2016 and will enrich both Berlin’s diverse cultural landscape and the international art scene: the start of building work on the future URBAN NATION MUSEUM FOR URBAN CONTEMPORARY ART. In the coming months, a globally unique new centre for exhibitions, research and exchange focussed on one of the most important art forms of the 21st century will emerge.

Berlin’s secretary for cultural affairs, Tim Renner, was on hand to congratulate the initiators of this ambitious plan on behalf of the city government. The internationally unique institution is scheduled to open in mid-2017 in the Wilhelminianera building at Bülowstrasse 7 in Schöneberg. The building will be completely transformed for the purpose. In other words, there won’t be a new building; the existing one will be converted into a museum to the innovative plans of the architecture bureau GRAFT.

Berlin Museum Urban Nation

The building has long since ceased to look like a normal residential block anyway: over the last three years, it has regularly served as a giant canvas for various stars of the street art scene, including Shepard Fairey, D*Face, Maya Hayuk and The London Police. They were invited to Berlin by URBAN NATION, an initiative that has been networking local and international street artists with great creativity and resounding success since 2013. The idea and the artistic design of the museum are the brainchild of Yasha Young, manager and future director of the museum. URBAN NATION is part of Berliner Leben, a non-profit foundation established in 2013 by Gewobag.

Three Columns of the New Museum are already standing tall: Connect. Create. Care. The motto “Connect. Create. Care.” Is a perfect description of the art initiative’s concept and programme: URBAN NATION operates as an international network that promoted connections between artists, creatives and the public through regular art projects and exhibitions and, at the same time, produces high-quality urban art for Berlin.

Berlin Museum Urban Nation

Markus Terboven, board member of Gewobag, Thomas Willemeit, Founding Partner GRAFT, Yasha Young, Director URBAN NATION, Tim Renner, secretary for culture of the city of Berlin, Hendrik Jellema, chairman of the board of “Berliner Leben”. (left to right) © URBAN NATION

The New Vangaurd at MOAH

The New Vangaurd

Thinkspace x Lancaster Museum of Art and History present ‘The New Vanguard’

On view August 13th – October 30th, 2016

Opening Reception: Saturday, August 13th at MOAH

Murals and installations in the museum:
Alex Yanes
Bumblebeelovesyou
Meggs

In the ‘Vault Gallery’:
‘Once An Astronaut’ from Scott Listfield

‘The New Vanguard’ in the ‘South Gallery’ – curated by Thinkspace:

Aaron Li-Hill
Adam Caldwell
Alex Garant
Alex Yanes
Amandalynn
Amy Sol
Benjamin Garcia
Brett Amory
Brian Viveros
C215
Carl Cashman
Casey Weldon
Chie Yoshii
Cinta Vidal
Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker
Cryptik
Dan Lydersen
Dan-ah Kim
Derek Gores
Dulk
Erik Siador
Felipe Pantone
Fernando Chamarelli
Glennray Tutor
Henrik Aa. Uldalen
Icy and Sot
Jacub Gagnon
Jaime Molina
James Reka
Jana & JS
Jean Labourdette (aka Turf One)
Jeremy Hush
Joel Daniel Phillips
Josie Morway
Juan Travieso
Kyle Stewart
Linnea Strid
Lisa Ericson
Low Bros
Lunar New Year
Mando Marie
Marco Mazzoni
Mark Dean Veca
Mark Warren Jacques
Martin Whatson
Mary Iverson
Matt Linares
Matthew Grabelsky
Meggs
Mike Egan
Nosego
Pam Glew
Ricky Lee Gordon
Scott Radke
Sean Norvet
Tony Philipppou
Wiley Wallace
X-O
Yosuke Ueno

Taking place in tandem with ‘POW! WOW! Antelope Valley’ featuring:
Amandalynn
Andrew Schoultz
Bumblebeelovesyou
David Flores
Hueman
Julius Eastman
Kris Holladay
Mando Marie
Mark Dean Veca
Meggs
Michael Jones

For tickets and more, please check out www.lancastermoah.org

Lancaster Museum of Art and History
665 W. Lancaster Blvd.
Lancaster, CA 93534