Mahalo Pow! Wow! Hawaii 2017

Pow! Wow! has grown into an international movement bringing their vision of art and collaboration to cities around the world. Yet, it is Pow! Wow! Hawaii that has an electric energy that can’t be measured as the heart beats harder at home. We are honored to have taken part in Pow! Wow! Hawaii for the fourth consecutive year and we still have some amazing pieces available. Big mahalo to all that make Pow! Wow! Hawaii happen!

Redefined Media did a fantastic job capturing the weeklong event and what Pow! Wow! is really all about.

Video directed by Andrew Tran of Redefined.Media in collaboration with Cory Stephen Martin.
Additional Footage from Jonas Maon.

Music:
ODESZA – Kusanagi
Nomadic Firs – Cover Bombs (ODESZA Edit)
Steve Aoki – Just Hold On

Second Mural for RAD Napa Completed by Felipe Pantone

We’re excited to share the completed mural ‘Chromadynamica’ from Felipe Pantone for the RAD Napa mural project in Napa, California curated by Thinkspace Gallery. The project is sponsored by the Wine Train and the Napa Valley Vine Trail.

Photos courtesy of project documentarian Birdman photos.

Cinta Vidal Interviewed about her POW! WOW! Hawaii at HoMA mural.

Thinkspace Family artist Cinta Vidal completed a stunning mural at the Honolulu Museum of Art during Pow! Wow! Hawaii this year that we were honored to curate. The above video documents the creation of this mural in addition to an interview with Cinta about her inspiration. We’re excited to see Cinta Vidal in action again in a few weeks as she works on a featured installation for Juxtapozed at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art.

You can view all available works from Cinta Vidal on the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Tory Lovegates Featured in the March Issue of Juxtapoz Magazine

Thinkspace family artist Troy Lovegates is featured in the March issues of Juxtapoz magazine. The issue is available on newsstands now and you can get a taste of the interview over on Juxtapoz.com. We love Troy’s unique way of translating his street art style into a gallery aesthetic with drawings, paintings, and sculptures. All available artwork from Troy Lovegates can be viewed on the Thinkspace Gallery website.

With murals scattered around the globe, what do you enjoy most about painting large scale, and is there any one piece that you took the most pleasure in doing?
A lot of days I start heading to my studio to work and don’t want to go inside. Instead, I end up just wandering all day. I hate being indoors. Studios are lonely boxes. Being an artist is one lonely ass thing to become. Being outside painting is a marriage of painting and fresh air. I love it. The last mural I painted in Toronto was 13 pillars with 13 locals painted on them. I took images of people who passed through the park and painted them. I really enjoyed how the community embraced the wall. People would come by with food and drinks just to talk for hours. That just doesn’t happen at my studio.

 

Juxtapozed and Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics Opening at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art April 2017

Opening April 21, 2017, at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art are Juxtapozed and Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics!, co-curated by Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace Gallery, Gary Pressman of Copro Gallery, and Adjunct Curator of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Josef Zimmerman. The second installment of exhibitions Los Angeles’ Thinkspace Gallery has brought to the Museum to date, following the success of Invisible College from 2015, both showcase new and exciting work from the steadily expanding New Contemporary Art Movement. A continuation of Thinkspace’s mutually reinforced mission to garner institutional exposure and recognition for New Contemporary Art, its history, founders, key players, and artists, the exhibitions celebrate the impact of its most enduring media platforms, Juxtapoz Magazine, and the work of one of its most iconic trailblazers. Now widely considered the largest and longest running art movement in history, the New Contemporary Art Movement encompasses everything from Street Art and Muralism to Pop Surrealism and Hyperrealism.

The New Contemporary Art Movement has been largely self-sustained through a network of alternative cultural platforms, primarily outside of the mainstream and institutionally vetted art markets, including social media, blogs, zines, underground collectives, galleries, and urban and alternative spaces. Copro and Thinkspace galleries in Los Angeles are two of the movement’s most visible and active proponents, taking the work to art fairs, collaborating with galleries internationally, and opening institutional channels for its exhibition and appreciation. Boasting 400,000 followers through its various social media outlets, Thinkspace has helped to bring the work to a wider international audience. As the movement continues to expand on a global scale, its diversity, inclusivity, and vitality set it apart from more exclusionary art world models.

Co-founder and Curator of Thinkspace Gallery, Andrew Hosner, says, “Our plan is to continue to knock on the door of the establishment until more listen, more take notice, more start to add these artists to their permanent collections, and start to give the movement the attention it has earned and deserved.”

Juxtapozed, a show title drawn from the magazine of the same name in the imperative tense, celebrates the legacy made possible by Juxtapoz. The access the publication has facilitated since the early 90s to a widely cast variety of media and expressions, has shaped the movement itself and preserved its continued relevance. Founded in San Francisco in 1994 by Robert Williams, Craig Stecyk, Greg Escalante, Eric Swenson and Fausto Vitello, Juxtapoz evolved from the intent to foster and support the art and culture of the underground. The magazine provided an alternative voice and narrative as a counterpart to the dominant New York-centric discourse of contemporary art and featured artists who straddled the boundaries between “high” and “low” culture. Aligning itself with the aesthetics of contemporary street culture, figurative art, California car culture, gig posters, tattoos, graphics, psychedelia, and comics, the publication became a conduit and forum for an entirely new generation of artists who were latching on to a populist visual vernacular.

Juxtapozed features an installation by Laurence Vallieres and murals by Cinta Vidal & Bumblebeelovesyou. The group exhibition features individual works by 48 New Contemporary artists, including 1010, Aaron Nagel, Alex Garant, Allison Sommers, Amy Sol, Bec Winnel, Benjamin Garcia, Brian M. Viveros, Chris Mars, Cinta Vidal, Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker, Daniel Bilodeau, David Rice, Derek Gores, Dulk, Erik Siador, Erika Sanada, Fernando Chamarelli, Frank Gonzales, Fuco Ueda, Ian Francis, Jeff Gilette, Joe Sorren, Joel, Daniel Phillips, Jolene Lai, Jon Swihart, Josh Keyes, Juan Travieso, Kazu, Kelly Vivanco, Kikyz1313, Lauren Brevner, Liz Brizzi, Mark Ryden, Martin Whatson, Martin Wittfooth, Mary Iverson, Mike
Davis, Meggs, Ron English, Sepe, Sergio Garcia, Shag, Shepard Fairey, Stephanie Buer, Telmo Miel, Travis Louie, Wiley Wallace, and Yosuke Ueno.

‘JUXTAPOZED’
Curated by Andrew and Shawn Hosner with Gary Pressman & Josef Zimmerman

Opening Reception:
Friday, April 21st 7-10PM

On View: April 22nd – July 9th, 2017

Taking Place At:
Fort Wayne Museum of Art
311 E. Main Street
Fort Wayne, IN 46802

Featuring murals and installations from:
Bumblebeelovesyou – Cinta Vidal – Icy and Sot – Laurence Vallieres

Alongside a group show featuring works from:
1010
Aaron Nagel
Alex Garant
Allison Sommers
Amy Sol
Bec Winnel
Benjamin Garcia
Brian Viveros
Chris Mars
Cinta Vidal
Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker
Daniel Bilodeau
David Rice
Derek Gores
Dulk
Erik Siador
Erika Sanada
Fernando Chamarelli
Frank Gonzales
Fuco Ueda
Ian Francis
Jason Seife
Jeff Gillette
Joe Sorren
Joel Daniel Phillips
Jolene Lai
Jon Swihart
Josh Keyes
Juan Travieso
Kazu
Kelly VIvanco
Kikyz1313
Lauren Brevner
Liz Brizzi
Mark Ryden
Martin Whatson
Martin Wittfooth
Mary Iverson
Meggs
Mike Davis
Ron English
Scott Listfield
Sepe
Sergio Garcia
Shag
Shepard Fairey
Stephanie Buer
Telmo Miel
Travis Louie
Wiley Wallace
Yosuke Ueno

Thinkspace Gallery
www.thinkspacegallery.com
IG icon @thinkspace_art

Copro Gallery
www.coprogallery.com
IG icon @coprogallery

FWMoA
www.fwmoa.org
IG icon @fwmoa

Scott Listfield Interviewed in Art Maze Mag

Thinkspace Family artist Scott Listfield was recently interviewed in Art Maze Mag discussing astronauts, isolation, and his artistic wisdom.  We still have a few pieces from Scott Listfield’s well-received solo presentation in the Vault Gallery at the Lancaster Museum of Art and History that are available on the  Thinkspace Gallery website.

Jump over to Art Maze Mag’s website for the full interview.

AMM: What influences outside the visual arts inspire and impact your approach to making work?

SL: Oh lots of things. I think there’s a ton of amazing art happening right now, but I’d say that most of my influences come from elsewhere. Books and movies, particularly science fiction. Cartoons, both contemporary and the ones I watched growing up. I listen to a lot of music in the studio which sometimes sets the tone for what I’m working on. I also like to get out and walk around when I can, especially places far from home. Seeing new things gets me back in the mind set of my astronaut.

Coming In March – Atsuko Goto’s ‘The Silence of Idols’

Atsuko Goto
The Silence of Idols
March 4, 2017 – March 25, 2017

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room are new works by emerging Japanese artist Atsuko Goto; The Silence of Idols is the artist’s first solo project with the gallery. A graduate of the Tokyo University of the Arts, Goto also studied at the National School of Fine Arts in Paris.

The artist creates beautifully melancholic images of delicate figures cloaked and merged with natural elements, everything from flowers and butterflies to insects, birds, and fish. Her muted palette is as ghostly as haze, achieved through the unique application of diluted pigments made from semi-precious lapis lazuli, ink, and gum arabic applied to cotton.

Inspired by Japanese Shinto and the belief that nature is animated by divinity and sacred spirits harbored in every living and inanimate thing, Goto creates imagery that conveys this feeling of profuse life force and intangible mystery, offset by a darker suggestion of mourning and lament. Quietly meditative, her works exude a dreamlike calm and resignation despite their abundance of detail and the density of her compositions. Silence and forlorn composure define this existence of the preternatural.

Fragile in their tempered darkness, the works are subtle and near translucent – like the unknown light and strange optics of an otherworldly plane where everything is unsubstantial. A feeling of entrapment and isolation persists, however, in the quietude. Like hauntings from the subconscious, the paintings feel like faded dreams, surreal distortions bordering on the ominous. Unsettling, the muted beauty of these diaphanous idols loom, uncannily caught in a thin veil between worlds.