ART LOVERS GIFT GUIDE : LONDON STYLE

Want to know the perfect gift for the art lover in your life? It’s Art!

Here are a few stunning pieces for the walls of any passionate art collector who has a pulse on the new contemporary art movement. The following pieces were shown in London at the Moniker International Art Fair.

Sainer (Etam Cru) and Zoer “Plastic Psychodelic” (2017) Acrylic on linen Sainer and Zoer Collab 60″ × 48″ | 152× 122cm $9,000

Sainer (Etam Cru) is a painter and muralist who is a graduate of Academy of Fine Arts in Lodz. He currently lives and works in Gdynia, Poland.

Telmo Miel “Round About Midnight” (2017) Oil and acrylic on linen 19.69″ × 27.56″ | 50 × 70 cm $2,400

Telmo Miel is Telmo Pieper and Miel Krutzmann, a muralist and image-making duo from the Netherlands. Combining multiple elements in a single composition, they layer references to the human and animal worlds to create complex creatures and fantastic scenarios. With positivity, humor and a touch of the romantic, their work is arresting and epic.

James Bullough “Oblivion” (2017) Oil, acrylic and aerosol on wood panel 31.5″ × 27.5″ | 80× 70cm $4,400

James Bullough is an American born artist living and working in Berlin, Germany. His paintings, and huge monumentally scaled site-specific murals are phenomenal combinations of realist painting technique and graphic punctuation.

Carl Cashman “A Helmet Full of Tears” (2017) Spray on cradled wooden panel 16″ × 20″ | 41 × 51 cm $800

Carl Cashman creates vibrant neon colored op-art, a genre he has coined “neometry”, or neon geometry. The works are hypnotic, at times bordering on the hallucinatory, and blur the distinction between digital and analog forms.

David Cooley – “Epicycloidal” (2017) Acrylic and resin on wood panel 36″ × 36″ | 91× 91cm $6,500

David Cooley, a Santa Barbara-based artist is inspired by the idea of creating something that’s previously only existed in thought and making something that’s tangible, with the intent to have an impact on others, whether it’s thought-provoking, fun, or just aesthetically pleasing.

Kevin Peterson “Indie Lion” (2017) Oil on wood panel 28″ × 15″ | 71× 38cm $6,500

Kevin Peterson‘s work is about the varied journeys we take through life. It’s about growing up and living in a world that is broken. These paintings are about trauma, fear and loneliness and the strength that it takes to survive and thrive. They each contain the contrast of the untainted, young and innocent against a backdrop of a worn, ragged, and defiled world.

To view all available pieces from this international show and their US price click here.

If buying an original piece of artwork as a gift is too bold or rich for your blood, the Thinkspace Projects print shop is filled with beautiful high-quality giclee prints.

Happy Holidays! 

BLACK METAL FRIDAY at the PRINT SHOP

It’s Black Metal Friday for the Thinkspace Print Shop and it’s the perfect time to pick up some goodies for your art loving friends for the holidays.

Our sale is active now through tomorrow, Saturday, December 2nd at 7 PM PST.

Today’s coupon code is:
BLACKMETALFRIDAY
Below is the direct link to have the code added to your invoice:
EVERYTHING except our new print from Audrey Kawasaki is included in the sale. Don’t miss out on this last chance to order something in time for the holidays.

Brian M. Viveros “Viva Vaudeville” Print
$200.00

Casey Weldon “Death Valley” Print
$50.00

Josh Keyes – “I’ll Love You Till the End of the World” Print
$250.00

Instagram Round Up : Scope Art Miami 2017 Edition

Our flights are booked, a crate has been shipped, and we’re headed out to Miami for Scope Art and the Juxtapoz Clubhouse. We will be presenting mini- solos showing new work from Michael Reeder and James Bullough, mini-profiles with new pieces from DotDotDot, Lauren Brevner, Sergio Garcia, & Wiley Wallace, in addition to forty plus twelve by twelve pieces from the Thinkspace Family.

Our mission continues to be to expose and introduce the New Contemporary Art movement to art lovers and show the vast burgeoning talent within the movement. Follow a few of the talented artist who we will be showing at Scope Art Miami on Instagram for a “behind the scene” look into their studios, works in progress, and life as an artist – they might even share their Miami antics on their InstaStory.

Follow Michael Reeder at @reederone on Instagram

Follow James Bullough at @james_bullough on Instagram

Detail of ‘Dust’. Another of the pieces I’ll be showing in Miami next week at Scope with @thinkspace_art

A post shared by James Bullough (@james_bullough) on

Follow DotDotDot at @dotdotdot on Instagram

…drying up!

A post shared by DOT DOT DOT (@dotdotdot) on

Follow Lauren Brevner at @laurenbrevner on Instagram

Follow Wiley Wallace at @WileyWallace on Instagram

A post shared by Wiley Wallace (@wileywallace) on

Follow Sergio Garcia at @_SergioGarcia_ on Instagram

Brooklyn Street Art Talks with BEZT for Beautiful Mess

Bezt Etam. “Beautiful Mistakes”. The artist is pictured here looking at his self-portrait. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art connected with Bezt while in New York for the exhibition Beautiful Mess at Spoke Art NYC. The feature is a great piece that walks with Bezt as he discusses the work in the show in addition to his creative process with longtime collaborator Sainer (who work as a duo under the moniker Etam Cru), visit the Brooklyn Street Art website for the full article.

Sometimes a portrait is actually the means to an end, rather than the focal point, just so he has the opportunity to paint something new. “For example the painting with the woman and the daughter piece, that one with the house. I wanted to paint the trees! I had a night photo of the trees and I said ‘Okay, I need an idea so I can paint the trees.’ – Brooklyn Street Art

Visit the Brooklyn Street Art website for the full piece.

Opening Reception of “LAX / JFK” at Spoke Art NYC

Thinkspace Project’s presented back to back shows at Spoke Art NYC this fall, with the opening of Bezt’s Beautiful Mess last month and then LAX / JFK this month. We loved working with our friends at Spoke Art NYC on the eleventh iteration of Thinkspace Projects traveling series bringing unique focus on the New Contemporary Art Movement.

LAX / JFK featured a mini solo exhibition by Matthew Grabelsky and showcased
over 50 new works from some of the top artists working in the New
Contemporary Movement.

Please visit Spoke Art NYC website to view all available work from the exhibition.

Photos courtesy of Lanee Bird

Instagram: @lovvr

Interview with James Marshall “Dalek” for The Space Monkey Returns!

Thinkspace Projects is pleased to present The Space Monkey Returns featuring new works by North Carolina-based artist James Marshall. Also known by his mutant cyborg epithet “Dalek,” an ode to the classic sci-fi British series Doctor Who. In anticipation of the exhibition opening, Saturday, December 2nd, we have an interview with James Marshall aka Dalek discussing the evolution of the Space Monkey and how he continues to challenge himself as an artist.

Opening Reception:
Saturday, December 2, 2017
6:00pm – 9:00pm

SH: Why do you think the Space Monkey has resonated with people so much?
JM: Maybe because it’s so representational of what is fascinating about humanity. I’d ideally hope that people can see a lot of the humor in it that is part of their own experiences through life. We sort of have to embrace the absurdity of our own stupidity as we stumble through navigating endless nuances.

SH: What is your favorite thing about being an artist? What do you think the role of art / the artist is in society?
JM: I just like making art. It’s fun for me. therapeutic in a way to relay a lot of my thoughts..but more so a way to keep my hands busy and mind occupied. Art/artist have always and will always be important to connect the dots of cultural shifts and the human experience. its connective tissue for the larger organism. that develops and delivers complex experiential layers into clear tangible objects.. how people relate to art is how it connects to their own lives. It gives meaning… it gives a voice… power and so on.

SH: Who has been one of the most influential people in your artistic development? Have they shared any advice with you other artists can apply to their work or journey?
JM: Me…and I only say that in so far as I need to remind myself constantly to stay motivated and push what I’m doing. Sometimes consciously, sometimes subconsciously…everyone’s journey is different. So I just try to keep focused on whats important to me and my own development as a person, and therefore as an artist.

SH: I know it’s old news, but for many, they were not aware at one point you were a studio assistant for Murakami. One choice story or a bit of wisdom from him that has stuck with you, that you’d care to share?
JM: No, it was a long time ago and hasn’t been relevant to my life in ages. I learned some technical stuff that helped me get organized, but ultimately I modified things to suit my needs.

SH: Who were some of your favorite punk bands when growing up?
JM: Oh man, Minor Threat for sure, The Freeze, Ill Repute, Scream, Dead Kennedys, Agent Orange, The Faction.

SH: How do you continue to challenge yourself as an artist?
JM: I just know I need to challenge myself. I’ve never been cool with going through the motions in any aspect of life, part of why I dropped Space Monkey years ago, didn’t feel I had anywhere to take it given my skill sets. I’ve learned a lot since then and it made sense to revisit it, I got excited by it again and I’m sure it’ll wear thin again…maybe? We’ll see, I just keep trying to teach myself how to paint how to understand color better, just the basics. Maybe once I figure that out I’ll get rolling. Without a doubt, I still feel like I haven’t really learned to paint yet, too many distractions in life and making art just isn’t my main focus. So maybe one day it will be and I’ll crank out some stuff.

SH: Your work really translates a love for color. What is your favorite color, and how many paint colors do you have in your studio? Do you mix them yourself?
JM: Yeah. Just trying to learn color, mixing them helps. I have a couple hundred right now, don’t have a favorite really, they are all good. Depends on the mood, day of the week and so on.

SH: Are you detail-oriented and a geometry nerd outside of your work, or is all the neurosis tapped out on the canvas?
JM: No, I gotta have things certain ways, there is a lot of that in my day to day life.

SH: Do you remember the first sticker you created of the Space Monkey? If so, do you have an image of it you can share?
JM: It was a long time ago… Shepard Fairey helped me make stickers back in 97 or maybe it was 98, anyhow…no photos…not that I have anyways.

SH: Who do you think everyone should look up?
JM: That’s a broad question, they should look up anyone that they want. I could name a million things, relevant to different aspects of what I find interesting in the world. It probably wouldn’t be an artist. Let’s be honest, for all artist do, it’s nowhere near as fascinating as what scientist or people in other exploratory fields contribute to the growth and development of our species.

SH: What about other artists’ work excites or fascinates you?
JM: Hard to say..it’s just a reaction.. usually based on whether something is interesting or not.. so much shit in this world is boring and unoriginal.. so i just like people who actually have something striking to say. Honesty always comes through in art or anything really, so if it feels genuine, it’s good. Too many posers out there.

SH: Whom would you want to collaborate with, dead or alive? The person can be in any area of the arts; film, dance, music, etc.
JM: Walt Disney probably.

SH: When not in the studio, what would an ideal day look like?
JM: Hanging with the family, that’s all I like to do when I’m not painting and watch Duke basketball.

TELMO MIEL AT THE FULLERTON MUSEUM CENTER

TELMO MIEL
‘Bit and Pieces, Odds and Ends’

We’re excited to have Telmo Miel back at the Fullerton Art Museum for their second solo exhibition with the institution. This special collection of eight new oil paintings opens alongside ‘Step Right Up: Behind the Scenes of the Circus Big Top 1890-1965’.

On view now through January 7, 2018 at:
Fullerton Museum Center
301 N. Pomona Avenue
Fullerton, California 92832