Opening Reception of Jolene Lai’s “Beside You” & Anthony Clarkson’s “Trail of Wandering Thoughts”

The opening reception of Jolene Lai’s ‘Beside You’ and Anthony Clarkson’s ‘Trail of Wandering Thoughts’ buzzed throughout the night as those in attendance enjoyed the details of the artists work. Jolene Lai’s installation was a first of it’s kind in our main room and Clarkson pushed her artist technique switching from acrylics to oils in his latest body of work. The exhibition is one view now until February 25th.

View available work from Anthony Clarkson and Jolene Lai on the Thinkspace website.

SERGIO GARCIA INTERVIEWED BY PROHBTD

Thinkspace Family artist, Sergio Garcia is known for his life-size and sometimes larger than life sculptures of hands and vices. Garcia has created these idle hands portraying various scenes mostly seen outside of the white walls of the gallery space garnering attention from collectors and celebrities. PROHBTD recently interviewed Sergio Garcia to dive deeper into his process.

Currently, Sergio Garcia will be exhibiting several new pieces this weekend at The 4th Annual ‘POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Movement’. To view more of Sergio Garcia’s work visit the Thinkspace Gallery website and view PROHBTD’s full interview with the artist on their site.

At Art Basel in Miami, you exhibited a giant ashtray with a cannabis joint that you titled A Little Conversation Piece. What is the conversation people should be having about cannabis?

It’s really a conversation piece about everything in America. It’s weird how [cannabis] is legal here, not there, this county yes, maybe that county. It gets to this point where it’s like, is it taboo to smoke out in the open? Where are we on this? Where are we with anything? When I was younger, there was more middle ground. It’s gotten so extreme that common sense went out the window. Especially with Donald Trump, it’s like, what are we doing now?

Sergio Garcia

Illusion Scene 360 Interviews Marco Mazzoni

The Illusion Scene 360 recently interviewed Thinkspace Family artist Marco Mazzoni discussing his artistic background, his desire to work with colored pencils, and his upcoming exhibition with us “Dear Collapse” opening March 4th.

The interview includes beautiful images of his work and insight into this talented artist. Visit illusion.scene360.com for the full interview.

In this show I try to underline through my artworks the sensations, mostly negative, intervening between people. For instance, when a human being interacts with another human being, the feelings that show up in this encounter are very similar to those we can retrieve in the world of animals. Although passive, we are always talking about violence. – Marco Mazzoni

Opening Night of Stephanie Buer’s ‘Uncommon Silence’ and So Youn Lee ‘Limpid’

We kicked off the year with two stellar exhibitions. In the main room Stephanie Buer entranced those in attendance with her latest body of work ‘Uncommon Silence’. The urban abandoned landscapes and often ignored landmarks of Los Angeles were rendered in picturesque detail.  Then in the project room So Youn Lee’s newest body of work for ‘Limpid’ dazzled in their whimsical neon pastel dreamlands and sticker glitter details.

Both exhibitions are on view now till January 28th.

View available work from Stephanie Buer here:
http://thinkspacegallery.com/shows/stephaniebuer-2017/show-pieces/

View available work from So Youn Lee here:
http://thinkspacegallery.com/shows/soyounlee-2017/show-pieces/

POW! WOW! Founders Featured on NBC Asian America

Our friends and founders of POW! WOW! Hawaii (and beyond), Jasper Wong and Kamea Hadar, are featured on NBC Asian America’s new series Self-Starters. We’re thrilled to see them featured in this short documentary for the Self-Starters series, and are excited to be seeing them soon in February for The 4th Annual ‘POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Movement

Sandra Chevrier Interview on PROHBTD

A fresh interview with Sandra Chevrier went live on PROHBTD.com yesterday. The Canadian artist exhibited her latest body of work at Thinkspace Gallery this past October for a nearly sold-out show, The Cages; and the Reading Rooms of their Lives. Visit PROHBTD’s website for the full interview with Chevrier and view available work by her on the Thinkspace Gallery website.

If a woman facing high expectations were to see your work, what emotions and feelings would you hope she would experience?

Art to me is not only a way of expression, it is a language on its own. I’ve always used it to release my inner demons. I now try to reflect not only my inner vision but find a matter that will speak to a larger audience.

The way I see it, the work demands to be dissected beyond its surface value. The masks that overlay the portraits are quite literally torn between the fantastical heroics and iconography of comic books and the harsher underlying tragedy of oppressed female identity and the exposed superficial illusion therein. Inside the male-dominated world within the Cages, my subjects denounce the role given to the female counterpart therein, refusing to play the part of seducer or victim. Also, the images used within the “cages” range from scenes of conflict, triumph and defeat. It gives focus to the latter, highlighting the fragility of the superhero, their own struggles and weaknesses, exposing the humanity within the superhuman. Society is asking us to become Superheros; we should allow ourselves to be fragile.

Audrey Kawasaki Interview on PROHBTD

Online culture magazine PROHBTD posted an incredible interview with Thinkspace Family artist Audrey Kawasaki. The interview features her most recent exhibition Interlude. Visit PROHBTD’s website for the full interview.

Do you envision your characters as inherently good or deceptively dangerous? 

Both, but more towards the latter. I imagine that, if she appeared in front of me, I would keep good distance. Her charm would be undeniable, and I’d be drawn to her, sure, but I’d rather watch and observe her from afar. I wouldn’t want to get entangled in her affairs. I think for me, as the artist who creates them, I like the idea that they are mysterious, secretive and difficult. Their intangibility makes for a good story and keeps me interested.