Juxtapoz Preview of Robert Williams’s “SLANG AESTHETICS” at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art

Robert William’s Slang Aesthetics is set to open at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art next week on April 22nd. In anticipation of the exhibition, Juxtapoz Magazine has an excellent feature on William’s discussing a few of the pieces that will be on view. Jump over to juxtapoz.com for the full article.

Purple as an Inexplicable Poetic Force
Robert Williams: It is not my intention to take every color in the color wheel and extol metaphysical significance to each hue. Nor is it justifiable to invoke the laws of physics with regards to scientific observations of the prismatic spectrum. However, colors do have personalities.

Robert Williams “Godfather of Low Brow” On the Cover of the Fort Wayne Reader

Fort Wayne Reader Cover

Robert Williams the Godfather of Lowbrow is on the front cover of the Fort Wayne Reader. The paper has a big feature on Williams this week leading into his exhibition opening next Saturday, April 22nd at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art.
The Fort Wayne Museum of Art in association with Thinkspace Gallery is pleased to present new works by Robert Williams. ‘SLANG Aesthetics!’ is on view at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art Gallery from April 22nd to July 23rd , 2017. The exhibition is Robert Williams’ first major body of work to make its debut in the Midwest, and will feature a selection of brand new oil paintings by the artist alongside all the works that originally made up this amazing exhibition alongside a suite of drawings, a series of large-scale sculptures, and the largest array of his ephemera to date.

Opening Reception:
Friday, April 21st 7-10PM

On View: April 22nd – July 9th, 2017 // showing in tandem with our ‘JUXTAPOZED’ group show

Taking Place At:
Fort Wayne Museum of Art
311 E. Main Street
Fort Wayne, IN 46802

To find out more about the exhibition please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website. 

POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Art Movement: Part IV Exhibition featured on Arrested Motion

arrested motion

Thank you to Arrested Motion for covering Exploring The New Contemporary Art Movement: Part IV exhibition.  Jump over to Arrested Motion’s website to explore the exhibition and view all available work from the show on the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Artists were asked to contribute 12 x 12″ pieces leading to a visually conforming display of works. Rounding things out was a showcase for Shok-1 (seen below) and a Homer Simpson x Banksy parody installation by Oak Oak (seen above). – Arrested Motion

SERGIO GARCIA INTERVIEWED BY PROHBTD

Thinkspace Family artist, Sergio Garcia is known for his life-size and sometimes larger than life sculptures of hands and vices. Garcia has created these idle hands portraying various scenes mostly seen outside of the white walls of the gallery space garnering attention from collectors and celebrities. PROHBTD recently interviewed Sergio Garcia to dive deeper into his process.

Currently, Sergio Garcia will be exhibiting several new pieces this weekend at The 4th Annual ‘POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Movement’. To view more of Sergio Garcia’s work visit the Thinkspace Gallery website and view PROHBTD’s full interview with the artist on their site.

At Art Basel in Miami, you exhibited a giant ashtray with a cannabis joint that you titled A Little Conversation Piece. What is the conversation people should be having about cannabis?

It’s really a conversation piece about everything in America. It’s weird how [cannabis] is legal here, not there, this county yes, maybe that county. It gets to this point where it’s like, is it taboo to smoke out in the open? Where are we on this? Where are we with anything? When I was younger, there was more middle ground. It’s gotten so extreme that common sense went out the window. Especially with Donald Trump, it’s like, what are we doing now?

Sergio Garcia

WIDEWALLS INCLUDE NAPA MURAL & TELMO MIEL

widewalls

We’re so excited to see Widewalls feature the first of RAD Napa’s murals, “Knocking on Heaven’s Door” by Natalia Rak and Bezt. They also featured Telmo Miels new mural that we wrote about here. Telmo Miel are headed to Hawaii this week for Pow! Wow! Hawaii, so make sure to follow our Hawaii adventure on Instagram.

Sandra Chevrier Interview on PROHBTD

A fresh interview with Sandra Chevrier went live on PROHBTD.com yesterday. The Canadian artist exhibited her latest body of work at Thinkspace Gallery this past October for a nearly sold-out show, The Cages; and the Reading Rooms of their Lives. Visit PROHBTD’s website for the full interview with Chevrier and view available work by her on the Thinkspace Gallery website.

If a woman facing high expectations were to see your work, what emotions and feelings would you hope she would experience?

Art to me is not only a way of expression, it is a language on its own. I’ve always used it to release my inner demons. I now try to reflect not only my inner vision but find a matter that will speak to a larger audience.

The way I see it, the work demands to be dissected beyond its surface value. The masks that overlay the portraits are quite literally torn between the fantastical heroics and iconography of comic books and the harsher underlying tragedy of oppressed female identity and the exposed superficial illusion therein. Inside the male-dominated world within the Cages, my subjects denounce the role given to the female counterpart therein, refusing to play the part of seducer or victim. Also, the images used within the “cages” range from scenes of conflict, triumph and defeat. It gives focus to the latter, highlighting the fragility of the superhero, their own struggles and weaknesses, exposing the humanity within the superhuman. Society is asking us to become Superheros; we should allow ourselves to be fragile.

Audrey Kawasaki Interview on PROHBTD

Online culture magazine PROHBTD posted an incredible interview with Thinkspace Family artist Audrey Kawasaki. The interview features her most recent exhibition Interlude. Visit PROHBTD’s website for the full interview.

Do you envision your characters as inherently good or deceptively dangerous? 

Both, but more towards the latter. I imagine that, if she appeared in front of me, I would keep good distance. Her charm would be undeniable, and I’d be drawn to her, sure, but I’d rather watch and observe her from afar. I wouldn’t want to get entangled in her affairs. I think for me, as the artist who creates them, I like the idea that they are mysterious, secretive and difficult. Their intangibility makes for a good story and keeps me interested.