Sandra Chevrier Interview on PROHBTD

A fresh interview with Sandra Chevrier went live on PROHBTD.com yesterday. The Canadian artist exhibited her latest body of work at Thinkspace Gallery this past October for a nearly sold-out show, The Cages; and the Reading Rooms of their Lives. Visit PROHBTD’s website for the full interview with Chevrier and view available work by her on the Thinkspace Gallery website.

If a woman facing high expectations were to see your work, what emotions and feelings would you hope she would experience?

Art to me is not only a way of expression, it is a language on its own. I’ve always used it to release my inner demons. I now try to reflect not only my inner vision but find a matter that will speak to a larger audience.

The way I see it, the work demands to be dissected beyond its surface value. The masks that overlay the portraits are quite literally torn between the fantastical heroics and iconography of comic books and the harsher underlying tragedy of oppressed female identity and the exposed superficial illusion therein. Inside the male-dominated world within the Cages, my subjects denounce the role given to the female counterpart therein, refusing to play the part of seducer or victim. Also, the images used within the “cages” range from scenes of conflict, triumph and defeat. It gives focus to the latter, highlighting the fragility of the superhero, their own struggles and weaknesses, exposing the humanity within the superhuman. Society is asking us to become Superheros; we should allow ourselves to be fragile.

Thinkspace Gallery Curating Murals for Rail Arts District (RAD) Napa

The Napa Valley Vine Trail, Napa Valley Wine Train and members of Napa’s local arts community have partnered to create the first art district in the Napa Valley, designated as the Rail Arts District (RAD) Napa.

RAD Napa will transform the existing Cross-Town Commuter Path into a cultural corridor providing an experiential and educational trail celebrating our beautiful Napa Valley.  This will be accomplished by applying murals to the backs of buildings, installing sculptures, fence art, landscaping, gateway features, and more!

Thinkspace is honored to be the curator for the mural portion of this amazing project. This will be an ongoing, multi-year project spanning dozens of walls and featuring some of the biggest names in muralism.

Kicking things off this Thursday will be Bezt of Etam Cru in collaboration with Natalia Rak – both artists arrive in from Poland tomorrow afternoon and we can’t wait to watch them work their magic up in Napa Valley.

Recent mural by Betz

The wall in Napa being buffed for Betz

Coming up in March will be Felipe Pantone from Argentina, followed by Cinta Vidal in April. More projects currently in the works. Plans are to have 6-8 walls created annually. We will have Birdman on scene documenting all the goodness, so we will be sure to share some progress later this week.

www.radnapa.org

Audrey Kawasaki Interview on PROHBTD

Online culture magazine PROHBTD posted an incredible interview with Thinkspace Family artist Audrey Kawasaki. The interview features her most recent exhibition Interlude. Visit PROHBTD’s website for the full interview.

Do you envision your characters as inherently good or deceptively dangerous? 

Both, but more towards the latter. I imagine that, if she appeared in front of me, I would keep good distance. Her charm would be undeniable, and I’d be drawn to her, sure, but I’d rather watch and observe her from afar. I wouldn’t want to get entangled in her affairs. I think for me, as the artist who creates them, I like the idea that they are mysterious, secretive and difficult. Their intangibility makes for a good story and keeps me interested.

Announcing The 4th Annual ‘POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Movement

 

Thinkspace and POW! WOW! present:

The 4th Annual ‘POW! WOW! Exploring The New Contemporary Movement’
As part of POW! WOW! Hawai’i 2017 (Feb. 12 – Feb. 17)

Opening Reception: Sunday, February 12 5-10PM
Special engagement on view through February 17

Honolulu Museum of Art School
1111 Victoria Street
Honolulu, HI 96814
*Across the street from the main museum

Thinkspace is honored to once again be exhibiting with the Honolulu Museum of Art School as part of this year’s POW! WOW! Hawai’i mural event.

For the fourth iteration of Thinkspace’s special exhibition ‘POW! WOW! Exploring the New Contemporary Art Movement‘ we have curated an exciting mix of established and up and coming artists from around the world.

This special exhibition will feature close to 100 local and international artists curated by Los Angeles-based gallery Thinkspace. In addition to the group show there will be a featured artist showcase from UK based artist Shok-1 and an installation from Oak Oak out of France. This massive group exhibition serves as a survey of the burgeoning New Contemporary Art Movement for art lovers on Oahu and the world over via social media, handpicked by one of the movement’s most prolific and respected galleries.

“With roots firmly planted in illustration, pop culture, comics, street art and graffiti, put quite simply the New Contemporary Art Movement is art for the people,” Thinkspace co-founder Andrew Hosner

Thinkspace sponsored POW! WOW! mural at the Honolulu Museum of Art: Cinta Vidal
Featured Artist: Shok-1
Installation from: Oak Oak
12×12 inch works from:
Aaron Li-Hill
ABCNT
Alex Garant
Alex Yanes
Amy Sol
Baghead
Benjamin Garcia
Bob Dob
Brian Mashburn
Brooks Salzwedel
Bumblebeelovesyou
C215
Candice Tripp
Carl Cashman
Christopher Konecki
Collin Van Der Sluijs
Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker
Dan Lydersen
David Cooley
David Rice
Defer
Denial
Derek Gores
Drew Leshko
Dulk
Edwin Ushiro
Ekundayo
Erik Siador
Evoca
Fernando Chamarelli
Fuco Ueda
Ghostbeard
Henrik Aa. Uldalen
Ian Francis
Icy and Sot
James Bullough
James Marshall (aka Dalek)
James Reka
Jeff Gress
Jolene Lai
Jose Mertz
Joseph Martinez
Juan Travieso
Katch
Kelly Vivanco
Kohshin Finley
Kwanchai Moriya
Kyle Stewart
Linnea Strid
Lisa Ericson
Liz Brizzi
Liz McGrath
Low Bros
Luke Chueh
Mari Inukai
Martin Whatson
Mary Iverson
Matthew Grabelsky
Meggs
Mike Egan
Molly Gruninger
Oak Oak
Okuda
Patch Whisky
Peter Adamyan
Paul Barnes
Ricky Lee Gordon
Rodrigo Luff
Sail
Scott Listfield
Sean Lugo
Sean Mahan
Sebastian Wahl
Sergio Barrale
Sergio Garcia
Tara McPherson
Tati Suarez
Telmo Miel
Tran Nguyen
Wiley Wallace
Woes
Wooden Wave
Yok & Sheryo
Yosuke Ueno
For full details check out:

James Bullough Featured on Artist A Day

Thinkspace Family artist James Bullough was recently featured on Artist A Day. Bullough’s distinctive style has graced found materials, canvases, and massive walls. We have big things coming up this year with James Bullough including an artist spot in ‘LAX / DTW: Detroit Hustle II’ opening June 30th at Inner State Gallery/ 1xRun.

All available work from James Bullough can be viewed on Thinkspace Gallery website, and make sure to sign up for the Thinkspace Gallery newsletter for updates on Bullough.

Jump over to Artist A Day to view James Bullough’s feature. 

Last Days To View SANER’s “In A Dream (En un Sueño)” & NEXUS group exhibition at The Brand Library and Art Center

Today, Friday, January 6th and tomorrow, Saturday, January 7th are the last days to catch SANER’s In A Dream (En un Sueño) and the extensive group exhibition NEXUS at The Brand Library and Art Center. This must see show feature pieces by 64 New Contemporary artists alongside murals and installations by Bumblebeelovesyou, Cryptik, Drew Merritt, Kelly Vivanco, Lucien Shapiro and Yoskay Yamamoto.

The Brand Library and Art Center is a hidden Los Angeles treasure. The 3,200 square foot venue consists of a primary exhibition space, a 2,800 square foot Skylight Gallery, and an auxiliary space, the Atrium Gallery, 500 square feet overlooking their courtyard.

1601 W. Mountain St., Glendale, CA 91201
Friday – Sunday  10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m

After a day at the Brand Library and Art Center, join us this Saturday night, January 7th for the opening of Stephanie Buer’s Uncommon Silence and So Youn Lee’s Limpid.

 

Interview with Stephanie Buer for “Uncommon Silence”

Stephanie Buer

Thinkspace is proud to present Stephanie Buer’s newest body of work ‘Uncommon Silence’ in our main room this Saturday, January 7th. The Portland-based artist realistic paintings and charcoal drawings capture the vacant and desolate sprawl of abandoned urban spaces. In anticipation of her upcoming exhibition with us, we have an exclusive interview with Stephanie Buer to discuss her inspiration, exploring urban spaces, a day in the studio, and so much more.

Join us at the opening of ‘Uncommon Silence’ Saturday, January 7th from 6 to 9 pm. 

SH: What’s the inspiration behind the exhibition?
SB: Los Angeles is the inspiration. We wanted to do something a little different for this show, so I came to LA for a week about a year ago and just wandered the city, looking for inspiration. It was a really great experience.

SH: Can you describe your creative process? What does a day in the studio look like?
SB: Once I’ve gathered all the images, gone through them and picked the ones I would like to work with, its pretty straight forward. The creative part comes in when wandering and finding beautiful places to paint and then arranging the compositions. After that, it’s just putting in the hours to get it all done. I work anywhere from 6-12 hrs a day. I bike to the studio, paint or draw for awhile, head to the gym to work out or grab a meal with friends then usually head back to the studio. I can’t work more than about 6 hrs in one stretch, my focus starts to fall apart and the work gets sloppy, so that’s usually when I take a break.

BUER

SH: When not working on your art, what is your favorite thing to do?
SB: I love climbing. If I’m not working at the studio, I’m at the gym climbing, at Smith Rock climbing or off in the mountains somewhere. Its so much fun, I can’t get enough. I also spend a lot of time hiking, practicing yoga and biking. I like to stay really active.

SH: What is your favorite abandoned space? Do you have an interesting story to share from exploring different spaces?
SB: My favorite abandoned building to explore is the Packard Plant in Detroit, I think it always will be. I loved that space so much, I spent a lot of time there in college, after college, I’ve been wandering that property for the past 14 years or so. I have a lot of great memories in that space. It’s being renovated now, I haven’t been in it in over a year. It will probably never be the same as it was, so I’m very happy to have gotten to know it when I did. I remember exploring that building around Christmas once and way deep in the building we found some abandoned rooms that were rented out at one time as storage units. They were filled with so many old relics of peoples lives, it was pretty sad but also exciting. We found a bunch of boxes of old Christmas decorations and we decorated the hallways with everything we found. It was very festive and cold and snowy and amazing!!

SH: This question feels ridiculous to ask, but the world is one in which women have to be more on guard. Going into abandoned spaces for your reference photos, how do your ensure you’re safe or push pass any apprehension you had about exploring these spaces. What advice would you give other female artists who are afraid?
SB: I am a very independent woman and I feel very confident in my skills in the wilderness and on mountains but it’s true that in our world, you still have to be careful and be aware of unsafe situations. I never go alone, that’s one piece of advice I could give. Even if I know the space really well. These abandoned places attract people from all margins of our society including a lot of people with mental illnesses. There just isn’t the funding in this country to take care of people with mental issues and they end up on the streets and then in these spaces where they can hide and live and they’re just very unpredictable. Most are incredibly friendly and have great stories to share but you never know.

Also, be aware of the consequences of getting caught, and make sure you’re cool with that before going. Most of the time I can talk my way out of things but if and when I do get caught I like to know the consequence ahead of time so I’m not surprised and then angry. We have a saying in mountaineering, the number one rule in mountain climbing is, don’t fall, the second rule is, don’t fall and the third is . . .don’t fall! I’d say the same goes for this, but it’s don’t get caught! So, go out with others, carry a knife, wear running shoes, bring nothing valuable, be aware and bring snacks!

SH: In a 2012 interview you shared your love of Detroit and the Packard Plant, have you found a similar kinship with Portland or an inspiring location?
SB: I have not sadly. There are a few places I like to wander and as Portland becomes more popular and people start moving here, I’ve noticed an increase in the amount of graffiti which is fun. I like living here though, the creative community is amazing, lots of really friendly, talented people. I also like the easy access to climbing, hiking, and mountaineering. My family is all still in Michigan though, and always will be so its still home and I go there a lot. I think I’ll do more traveling to explore urban spaces in the future too. I had a great time wandering LA and look forward to getting to know other cities in that way.

SH: You’ve shared you’re not a history buff but you have a clear fascination with the past and its influence on the present if you were to have a dinner party what 3 historical figures would you invite and what would be on the menu?
SB: There would definitely be pizza, really good pizza and a couple bottles of wine. I’ve been eating a lot of pizza lately. I would love to sit and chat with John Steinbeck. One of my favorite books of all times is Sailing Alone Around the World, by Joshua Slocum. I’d love to chat with him about his adventures. I know I should probably list some painters or something like that, but painters are weird. We spend too much time alone painting and we get weird. It’s okay though. I climbed in the Bugaboos this summer and was reading these stories about Conrad Kain, a famous mountaineer from the early 1900’s, he climbed with a lot of badass looking pals, including a few ladies. I would love to sit down and hear their stories. I love hearing about people who adventured before it was made too convenient. Everything was difficult and they were so tough.

SH: What excites you about other artists work? What makes you a fan and can you share a few people we should look up?
SB: I really love the way people use paint. Some artists say so much with so little, and the brush strokes and light. It’s too much! There’s some amazing painters out there. I’ve really been enjoying Phil Hales paintings. I can never seem to get enough of John Singer Sargent and Andrew Wyeth either.

SH: How long does one piece take to complete? Do you work on multiple pieces at a time?
SB: I definitely work more than one piece at a time. I usually only do one drawing at a time but I’ll also have two to three paintings in rotation. I use a very limited palette and a lot of the building materials in the images are shared from one image to another so I can get a lot of mileage out of a well-mixed palette. I like switching back and forth between charcoals and paintings as well, they inform each other in really great ways. I’m never entirely certain how long they take though. I always forget to time it. I would guess anywhere from 40-100 hrs.

SH: Kicking off the year with an exhibition seems like a solid way to start the year, what are a few of your goals for 2017?
SB: It really feels great! Last year was a really tough year for me, lots of personal challenges so this feels good. I’ve been so busy the last few months, finishing up work for the show that I haven’t given much thought to my goals. I have lots of climbing goals, I’d love to go back to school and get my masters, travel somewhere new and make a body of work from the trip, there will be a lot more dancing this year, being with my family and friends . . . . after the opening I’m gonna hide in the desert for a bit, I’ll think more on it then.