April 7, 2018 – April 28, 2018

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room are new works by Texan-born, Los Angeles-based artist Michael Reeder in mOMENt. A contemporary portraitist who uses figurative distortions and symbolic dislocations as a vehicle for the expression and examination of identity, Reeder’s controlled chaos is as evocative as it is strategically unsettling. Looking to the depiction of the figure as an exteriorization of the internal self, Reeder’s graphic and stylized works oscillate between moments of reduction and surplus.

The artist’s imagery is loose enough to encourage projection and tight enough to direct association by tapping into the subconscious, and its surreal recesses, as a limitless visual resource. By recreating a single subject multiple times, Reeder discovered the poetic potential in seriality and the subtlety of incremental difference: each iteration of the same producing profoundly different results.

Moving from flat graphic expanses of space and patterning to more realistically rendered areas, the portrait is positioned as a dynamic, shifting entity, a composite of competing forces colonized by often conflicting imperatives from the realms of the personal, political, and social. As something finite and circumscribed, the figure just like the self is, nonetheless, undeniably infinite as a locus of unwritten potential.


March 3, 2018 – March 24, 2018

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room is Tokyo, featuring new works by French-born, Los Angeles-based artist Liz Brizzi. Known for her evocative mixed-media works on panel, Brizzi is drawn to derelict spaces and forgotten city recesses. An avid urban explorer constantly in search of abandoned relics and trace history, her works begin with in-depth photo documentation and physical exploration. Among her favorite destinations and recurring visual resources are LA’s Downtown core and endless suburban outskirts, in all their surprisingly beautiful imperfection. In her second solo exhibition with Thinkspace, Brizzi has traveled to Tokyo, Japan, transforming its urban textures into beautifully saturated and surreal composites.

In search of an imperfect peace, Brizzi’s works are thoughtful and meditative, spun from quiet observation and creative reconstitution. She is always in search of the redemptive presence of histories, particularly those found in unlikely seclusions or empirically ‘unbeautiful’ places. This profound feeling of excavation persists throughout her work, conveyed visually through their mysterious pause, like an active seeking and uncovering. The poetic suggestions of isolation and philosophical loneliness are palpable somehow, in spite of Brizzi’s lush choice of palettes and highly pigmented rendering choices. Devoid of human subjects, her works focus on the remnants of human intervention, preferring instead to capture their relics and remains in the structures and delinquent architectures.

Her works begin with the photography she’s taken throughout the course of her urban excursions and international travels. Select images, or fragments, are then transferred to panel and painted into and over with multiple layers of diffuse acrylic pigment. The effect is surreal, otherworldly, and somehow closer to the real than the real itself, charged in part with the sensory impact of memory. At times, her compositions are direct representations of actual existing places and scenes, and at others, surreal composites assembled from splinters of several different places, moments, and observations. Though fundamentally familiar, once transformed by Brizzi, industrial urban vestiges, mundane cityscapes, and unassuming architectures become uncannily beautiful visual arrests.

Interview with Molly Gruninger for “Luminescent”

Thinkspace Projects is pleased to present Molly Gruninger first solo exhibition in the Thinkspace project room,  Luminescent.  The exhibition features new pieces of her hyper-realistic oil paintings, a commentary on the way we adorn ourselves to express our identity. In anticipation of the exhibition opening, Saturday, February 3rd, our interview with Molly Gruninger introduces us to this new artists and provides insight into her creative process and evolution.

Opening reception, Saturday, February 3rd  from 6 pm to 9 pm. 

SH: Can you tell us a little about your background? Where are you from? Studied art? Favorite food?
MG: I’m originally from Indiana where I studied art at Ball State University. I initially wanted to be an art teacher, but after realizing I have no patience for kids, went into graphic design. However, painting has always been my true love.

SH: What inspired this latest body of work?
MG: I’d say this series plays a bit more on the past, present and future of adornment.

SH: How did you come to develop this hyper-metallic futuristic style? What is your creative process?
MG: Once I began studying design and learning about the marketing world, I became much more aware of the effect that visual advertising and the media has on our perceptions of beauty and identity. Themes relating to self and social image are now inspired by all walks of life, but that was where the idea stemmed.

SH: What is your favorite and least favorite part of the creative process? How long does it take to complete a piece?
MG: I take reference photos to use in the painting process, which is first staged using mannequins. I do some concept sketches and then construct my decorations, while keeping my composition in mind. Ideas come to me at random times, so I usually keep a list for anytime something pops in my head.

SH: What does a day in the studio look like? How do you structure your days?
MG: The beginning stage when I’m coming up with concepts and the project is still fresh and exciting is my favorite part. The worst part is the end when you’re trying to work through a lack of sleep when pressed for time.

Pieces usually take anywhere from 60-80 hrs.

A typical day varies, but I usually have to eat breakfast and wake up for about an hour before I can focus in, but once I get going, I’ll work for 10 hrs straight with the exception of little breaks here and there to step back and reassess my progress.

SH: We use our outer appearance as a form of expression, so how have you used makeup style, hair, clothing as a way to express yourself or shape a moment?
MG: My style pretty much says I’m lazy about style haha. For the most part, I strive for comfortable and casual. Even if I dress up, comfort is number one. I just use all my pent up style expression at Halloween, when I can become a peacock.

SH: If your artwork inspired a cocktail? What would be the name and recipe?
MG: Shiny Surprise: various liquor obscured by a cup wrapped in ribbons that you must drink through a straw. You don’t know what you’re gonna get!

SH: What were you listening to while developing this body of work? Does your background noise influence the mood of the pieces?
MG: I tend to listen to movies or podcasts. Sometimes high energy music like Daft Punk or Kraftwork, but I’m usually paying half attention to the things going on around me when I’m working. It might affect my mood slightly, but not so much the pieces.

SH: Which piece in this show was most challenging and why?
MG: Probably the one titled “Armored Guard”, where I used my fiancé as a model. Though he did great, people tend to be slightly more temperamental about the process than a mannequin.

SH: If you were to have a dinner party, which 5 people would you invite (dead or alive)? What would be on the menu? And what is the one question you’d ask from everyone?
MG: Jim Henson, Cloris Leachman, Alex Jordan (House On The Rock), Charles Darwin, Obama. I would ask everyone to give a detailed description of their most embarrassing moment.

MOLLY GRUNINGER – LUMINESCENT – Opening February 3rd, 2018

February 3, 2018 – February 24, 2018

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room is Luminescent, featuring new works by Molly Gruninger. Fascinated by the ways in which we adorn ourselves physically to convey identity or meaning, Gruninger creates hyper-realistically rendered oil paintings that play with the extremes of artificiality and posturing. Taking the cultural importance we place on appearances, and the reductive demands of this implicit idealization as a starting point for this series, Gruninger captures the extremes of superficiality in a series of hyperbolically stylized, humanoid effigies.

The artists’ rendering of her ambiguously human figures feels digital and ominously futuristic. Like gilded automatons or mannequins, they seem to suggest the disconcerting extremes of objectification. These uncanny ‘portraits’ of metallic and reflective icons confound the viewer’s expectations, forcing us to question the artifice and the rigidity of the subjects, not to mention seeking evidence of their abjured humanity. Much in the same way that we are expected to ascribe value or worth to a person through a perfunctory physical impression, Gruninger’s cold, beautiful, silvery shells resonate with uncomfortable, if not dangerous, indifference.

Interview with Scott Listfield for “1984”

Scott Listfield’s latest body of work of hyper-realistic oil painting inspired by Orwell’s 1984 and his own childhood memories of the 80’s kick off Thinkspace’s 2018 project room. The single astronaut who explores various landscape eliciting self-reflection from the viewer takes a time jump to a world once familiar and distant, with an unsettling familiarity. Our interview with Scott Listfield dives deeper into the inspiration behind the show, those who have influenced his artistic growth, and posthumous collaboration.

Opening reception Saturday, January 6th from 6 pm – 9 pm.

SH: How long have you been working on this latest body of work? What themes were you exploring?
SL: Well, I’ve been painting astronauts since 1999 which, considering how fast things move these days, is basically the dawn of time. I’ve been thinking about this particular series, though, for probably about a year now. In January 0f 2017, the George Orwell novel 1984 jumped to the top of Amazon’s bestseller list, which seemed a bit curious to me, since it was written in 1949 and all. So I’d be thinking about doing a set of paintings about what 1984 meant in 2017, which touched on themes from the book, referenced the wave of nostalgia for the 80’s that we always seem to be in, pulled from memories I had as a kid growing up in the 80’s, but also maybe talked about the world we’re living in today. That’s already kind of a lot to throw into one group of paintings, so of course, I decided to also add in some references to popular music, a recurring Lamborghini Countach, and a whole hell of a lot of stripes. And it probably took me about 3-4 months to finish all the work.

SH: What is your favorite band, movie, and TV show from the 80’s?
SL: For those of you too young to remember the 80’s, it was pretty much exactly like Stranger Things. We all had BMX bikes, bowl cuts, and there was an inter-dimensional demon in our hometowns that we had to destroy. Just like Bruce Springsteen used to sing about. Anyhow, if I’m going to pick my favorites from that era, I feel like I have to choose the things that were most important to me then. Which means you’re getting 8-year-old Scott’s favorites, not necessarily the things that still resonate with me most today. Although, now that I think about it, maybe they’re the same list.

Band: Michael Jackson. Movie: Return of the Jedi. TV Show: Transformers (the cartoon, obviously).

SH: What is your favorite part of the creative process? What is your least favorite part?
SL: My favorite part is making paintings. My least favorite part is not making paintings.

SH: When painting are you listening to music or podcasts? Can you share what you were listening to while developing this body of work?
SL: I used to listen to music while in the studio, but as I’ve gotten older, and increasingly bewildered by young people’s tastes in music, I find myself listening to more podcasts. But I do still listen to a fair bit of music while I’m painting, and I had new albums by Cut Copy, Action Bronson, Yellow Days, LCD Soundsystem, and King Krule in circulation in the studio, alongside some 80’s hits by Duran Duran, Michael Jackson, Phil Collins, and Hall and Oates, which put me in the proper 1984 type of mood. As for podcasts, I listen to The Jealous Curator’s “Art For Your Ear,” one of my favorite art podcasts, and “Beyond Yacht Rock,” a podcast about yacht rock and other made up genres of music, by the guys who first coined the term, among others.

SH: Who has been one of the most influential people in your artistic development? Have they shared any advice with you other artists can apply to their work or journey?
SL: Oh jeez, I know I’m supposed to name a teacher or a mentor or something, and then fill everybody in on the most profound thing they ever said, which still resonates with me years later. But I don’t have a figure like that in my life, or at least not exactly. For a brief time in college, I became very good friends with a guy who was a couple years older than me and who had, unlike me at the time, lived a little. He had seen some things. Truthfully, he wasn’t exactly a great artist, but he was an extremely smart guy, and he told me a bunch of things I’m still unpacking years later. His name was Chris Ostoj, and unfortunately, he died young, which is sadly the way a lot of the most important people go. He used to look at my paintings and tell me, very seriously, to “Be more punk rock.” At the time, I’ll admit I didn’t exactly know what that meant, but it certainly seemed pretty bad ass, so I wrote it on my studio wall and repeated it to myself every now and again. After a while, I think I got it. And then I kind of stopped getting it. But hey, do with it what you will.

A little later on in my life, when I first started painting astronauts, I met my wife. She was my girlfriend at the time, of course, which is how that works, usually. She had studied illustration in school, while I had studied fine arts. Those two things are taught very differently, as it turns out. She looked at what I was doing, which involved essentially zero prep work and zero research and zero patience and 100% fucking around, and told me, in no uncertain terms, that I was stupid. And she was right. I learned to stop wasting time and get fucking serious about things.

Later still I met my friend Wes. It was at a time when I was making paintings of astronauts largely to throw in the back of a closet or perhaps to hang exclusively in my own home. Let’s just say that there was not exactly a lot of demand for my work back then. I was working a day job and it was hard to carve out the time to keep making paintings that almost nobody cared about. Every artist reaches this point, some many times, where they start thinking about hanging it up. Is it worth the time and the effort? Do I still like doing this enough to keep plugging away at it, even though it might never lead anywhere? I was at that point. My friend Wes would come over to my house, get kinda drunk, blunder into my studio, and proceed to tell me that he thought my paintings were better than the ones he had seen in the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. He was wrong of course, and when he’d get into VERY DRUNK territory he had trouble pronouncing “Hermitage.” But at a time in my life that I needed someone to believe in my art, he was there.

SH: In the few paintings we’ve seen so far, the astronaut doesn’t seem to be as isolated as previous works. Was this a conscious choice or only our perception?
SL: Well, there are certainly more people in these paintings, although they mostly appear in the form of large billboards with the faces of Madonna and Lionel Ritchie and Huey Lewis on them. I also included, I think for the first time, a secondary recurring character – the mysterious Lamborghini Countach which appears in a number of the paintings from this show. But you never see who’s driving the car, and it’s not clear if they’re somehow aligned with our protagonist, or just lingering maliciously in the background. These also all take place in a world that feels more artificial than my normal paintings. Pink and purple skies stripes raining down from above. I don’t know, but I actually feel like the astronaut might be even more isolated in these than my previous works.

SH: Who would you want to collaborate with, dead or alive? The person can be in any area of the arts; film, dance, music, etc.
SL: Wow, I can choose a dead person? Like, I’ll take dead Einstein? Oh wait, you said arts. Huh. To be honest, I don’t do a lot of collaborating, because I’m one of those creative loner types. When I do, on occasion, though, I prefer to work with someone I consider a peer. Because the work has to make sense together, right? And if I’m being honest, I would have trouble working with someone a lot more famous than me, or a lot more dead than me, or especially both. Like if I worked with zombie Picasso and the entire art world was super excited he had come back from the dead but then they were also all like “Uh, why is zombie Picasso working with this guy who paints astronauts? Was zombie Matisse available? Or living Jeff Koons at least?”

Anyhow, let’s go with Stanley Kubrick. Or Pharell. Can I say both? Wait, David Attenborough. Final answer.

SH: When not in the studio, what would an ideal day look like?
SL: I mean, I like to be in the studio and, like a lot of artists, I tend to get a bit itchy when I’m not. But I also like to travel, and seeing new things and places and people do inspire me, both personally and artistically. So I’d say, flying off to someplace warm, exploring a city I know only a little bit, and grabbing an ice cream cone with my wife. Or, you know, fighting ninjas. One or the other.

SH: What do you think the role of art / the artist is in society?
SL: Well, that’s a big question. I hate to be simplistic, but isn’t our role to make some art? Do people ask accountants “What do you think the role of accounting is in society?” What about baristas, or systems analysts, or Uber drivers? Actually, maybe they do. But I feel like artists, more so than most, are always questioning our place in the world. And why is that? Do we need to play a role in society, or can we just, you know, make some art? And who am I to explain in one or two really long run on sentences what role all the other artists in the world should be playing?

I’m just a guy who paints astronauts. Sometimes an astronaut with a cool car in the background. Sometimes an astronaut with like, oh shit, is that Hall and Oates? And sometimes an astronaut, and somebody looking at it stops for a moment, in the middle of everything else that is going on right now in their life, and maybe or maybe not there’s something in that painting that makes them think about the world we’re all living in together just a tiny bit different. And they feel a little more connected to something, or someone, or the things I’m saying, or trying to say, in my paintings resonates with them, in some small or large way. And maybe they think about buying it, and taking it home with them, to live with, forever and ever. Or maybe they don’t. Maybe they just smile. Or maybe they ignore it and scroll to the next thing in their Instagram feed. And hey, that’s fine. I’m just making some paintings of astronauts. I hope some people like them.

So yeah. I’m answering this question in the most roundabout way possible. Of course, we have a role to play. But I’m not the one who says what it is. That’s for each of us to figure out on our own.

SH: Kicking off the new year with an exhibition is a great way to start 2018! What are your artistic plans for the rest of the year?
SL: So I am very excited to be kicking off 2018 with a show of my work that feels to me like it’s pushing things forward a bit. It’s kind of dark in tone but exceptionally bright in color. It’s politically timely but set in the 80’s. Working on these paintings did feel like the next step for me, and I’m excited to see how it shapes my paintings coming up. I’m sure I’ll spend 2018 painting more astronauts. I’ll be doing a little something with Spoke in San Francisco in June, and a show with the very talented painter Josie Morway at Antler Gallery in Portland in the fall.