Opening Reception of Marco Mazzoni “Dear Collapse”, Atsuko Goto “The Silence of Idols”, and Alvaro Naddeo “Discarded”

We’d like to thank everyone who came to the opening reception of Marco Mazzoni “Dear Collapse”, Atsuko Goto “The Silence of Idols”, and Alvaro Naddeo “Discarded”. In the installation space of the main room, a video of Marco Mazzoni’s moleskin notebook played while those in attendance perused the breathtaking new work. Atsuko Goto’s haunting images drew people closer to inspect the hypnotizing eyes within her work, while Alvaro Naddeo’s detailed compositions challenged viewers to question their own observations of the world.

All three exhibition are on view now through March 25th.

Coming In March – Atsuko Goto’s ‘The Silence of Idols’

Atsuko Goto
The Silence of Idols
March 4, 2017 – March 25, 2017

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room are new works by emerging Japanese artist Atsuko Goto; The Silence of Idols is the artist’s first solo project with the gallery. A graduate of the Tokyo University of the Arts, Goto also studied at the National School of Fine Arts in Paris.

The artist creates beautifully melancholic images of delicate figures cloaked and merged with natural elements, everything from flowers and butterflies to insects, birds, and fish. Her muted palette is as ghostly as haze, achieved through the unique application of diluted pigments made from semi-precious lapis lazuli, ink, and gum arabic applied to cotton.

Inspired by Japanese Shinto and the belief that nature is animated by divinity and sacred spirits harbored in every living and inanimate thing, Goto creates imagery that conveys this feeling of profuse life force and intangible mystery, offset by a darker suggestion of mourning and lament. Quietly meditative, her works exude a dreamlike calm and resignation despite their abundance of detail and the density of her compositions. Silence and forlorn composure define this existence of the preternatural.

Fragile in their tempered darkness, the works are subtle and near translucent – like the unknown light and strange optics of an otherworldly plane where everything is unsubstantial. A feeling of entrapment and isolation persists, however, in the quietude. Like hauntings from the subconscious, the paintings feel like faded dreams, surreal distortions bordering on the ominous. Unsettling, the muted beauty of these diaphanous idols loom, uncannily caught in a thin veil between worlds.