Juxtapoz Coverage of Casey Weldon’s ‘Sentimental Deprivation’ Opening Night

The opening reception of Casey Weldon’s Sentimental Deprivation was recently covered on Juxtapoz.com. Go on a digital tour of the exhibition over on Juxtapoz’s website, and view Sentimental Deprivation in person during its final week at Thinkspace Gallery.

From optically disorienting four-eyed kittens and seemingly phosphorescent girls to giant disproportionately scaled Chihuahuas in desert canyon landscapes, nothing is too weirdly outré or unimaginable for Weldon’s visual fictions. – Juxtapoz.com

 

Opening Reception of Casey Weldon’s ‘Sentimental Deprivation’ and Kisung Koh ‘Long Live the Polar Treasure’

The opening reception of Casey Weldon’s ‘Sentimental Deprivation’ and Kisung Koh ‘Long Live the Polar Treasure’ landed on a night Los Angeles was pulsing with interesting art events, yet both artists still drew fans and art lovers to Culver City.

Many pieces from Casey Weldon‘s neon-wonderland sold before the opening, yet some stunning works are still available for interested collectors. KiSung Koh‘s also sold work the night of the opening and his nearly sold-out exhibition still has a few pieces available. Drop by the gallery while both exhibitions are on view now through June 24th.

Artist Casey Weldon next to ‘Apartmentalized’
Artist Kisung Koh
Artist Kisung Koh

Casey & Lilly

Interview with Casey Weldon for “Sentimental Deprivation”

Thinkspace is proud to present Casey Weldon’s latest body of work ‘Sentimental Deprivationin our main room. Casey Weldon’s paintings combine elements of humor, nostalgia, and the absurd; weaving pop culture and kitsch into the illuminated neon world. In anticipation of Weldon’s upcoming exhibition with us, we have an exclusive interview with Casey Weldon to discuss his inspiration, creative process, and dream collaboration.

Sentimental Deprivation‘s opening reception is this Saturday, June 3rd from 6 -9 pm in our project room.

SH: What is the inspiration behind this latest body of work?
CW: I was up way too late one night with my bestie artist pal Crystal Barbre, and she complimented me on some of my work that she deemed emotionally powerful. I laughed and reluctantly told her that everything is just based on a funny/weird idea and the color schemes are just colors I like. She puts a lot of herself into her work and is intimately connected to them, so she didn’t buy it. I was trying to persuade her that I, in fact, I was a robot devoid of emotion and have several ex-girlfriends that could testify to that. I went through a bit of rough time last year personally, and while working through that this has become an attempt of an emotionless person painting emotionally.

SH: You have a unique way of using colors that seem neon and creating a glowing illumination from within the work? What made you explore this style and develop the technique? Were you directly inspired by something to go in this direction?
CW: I’ve always had trouble keeping my work’s brightness on the level. Everything has always naturally skewed towards the darker side. To offset it, I started including small and super bright light sources. It’s a lot of fun inventing what the effects of a bright blue light will have under a setting red sun. I used to joke that my direct inspiration was Thomas Kincade, but now I’m beginning to wonder if that statement is 100% a joke.

SH: How have you grown as an artist in the last 5 years and how do you hope to grow in the following 5?
CW: Yes and yes. At least I hope. Usually, it works like we always feel the same despite those around us notice we are changing as people. I guess I’m hoping the opposite isn’t happening and I’m stuck in a rut I can’t even see.

SH: You’ve moved around a lot, do you feel your moves and various home-bases have influenced or informed your work?
CW: Yes, I think so, though it’s hard to point to any direct pieces and say why. I think it’s just more of a mindset. Like when I was in NY and depressed I painted a lot of funny pop art stuff. When I lived in the Las Vegas desert I painted a lot of lush nature. Here in gray Seattle, I paint a lot of bright colors. I guess I’m always looking for greener grass somewhere.

SH: What about another artists’ work excites or fascinates you? Who do you think everyone should look up?
CW: I get really excited anytime I feel like I don’t know what to expect from an artist. When their body works shifts often into new and unexpected directions it really inspires me to try and do the same. Although, on the other hand, I really admire artists that have developed a truly unique and identifiable voice, as often I feel like I struggle with that. Since moving to Seattle, I’ve had the pleasure of meeting some really fantastic new artists. Cassie Murphy is adorably batshit crazy, James Carpenter is a technical master, Jeremy Gregory is in a whole other world he has created, Angelita Martinez is always pushing experimentation and Abby Fields is somewhat green, but I am positive she will be a force to be reckoned with. I could name a 100 more because this town is full of them.

SH: What is your creative process? Can you walk us through a day in the studio?
CW: I wake up somewhere between 5-6am with a fire in my heart. “I’m going to get up and crush this day,” I say to myself. And then I eat a nutritionally questionable breakfast and go back to sleep. Around 10 am, I drag my ass to the drawing table and work till 6-7 or so. My process is 80% waiting for a decent idea or theme to start with, 10% gathering photo reference and shooting models, and 10% mad dash to finish painting by the deadline, which rarely ever happens. It’s a weird mix of wishful thinking and high anxiety.

SH: What do you think is the biggest misconception about being an artist?
CW: That we don’t work hard. That we are ‘lucky’ and are taking the easy road. Every artist is doing everything they can to sell a product there is absolutely no demand for, and they are betting on their own personal thoughts and emotions to sell it. They spend countless hours working with no guarantee of a paycheck, putting themselves out there and getting rejected, or taken advantage of over and over hoping to find some sort of communication with an audience. But your friend at the Dodge dealership says “get a real job”.

SH: What was playing in the background during the creation of this body of work? Does what you listen to inform the mood of the pieces or are they separate?
CW: I listen to a lot of podcasts and audiobooks and my local radio station KEXP (the best radio station ever). I’m deep into ’The First Law’ series by Joe Abercrombie, and thankfully the subject matters have kept to themselves.


SH: Who would you want to collaborate with, dead or alive? The person can be in any area of the arts; film, dance, music etc.
CW: Michel Gondry first comes to mind. It just seems like he has a boundless imagination and a DIY approach to realizing his ideas.

SH: If your artwork inspired a cocktail, what would it be made of and what would it taste like?
CW: Hmmm, how about a ‘Furball’ which is just a pint glass of Fireball with a rim dusted in cat hair? Or a ‘Glowey’, which is Ecto Hi-C and vodka with a glow stick in it? It may be obvious, but I’m not much of a cocktail guy.

SH: When not in the studio, what would an ideal day look like?
CW: Rock and roll all night, and sleep all day.

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Casey Weldon’s “Sentimental Deprivation” Opening Saturday, June 3rd.

 

Casey Weldon
Sentimental Deprivation
June 3 – June 24, 2017

Thinkspace Gallery is pleased to present new works by Casey Weldon in Sentimental Deprivation. Born in Southern California, Weldon attended Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and is now based out of Washington, D.C. by way of Las Vegas, New York, and Portland. His surreal paintings combine elements of humor, nostalgia, and the absurd to stage open-ended narratives, and lush imaginary views, that border on the hyperchromatic edges of psychedelia. From optically disorienting four-eyed kittens and seemingly phosphorescent girls to giant disproportionately scaled Chihuahuas in desert canyon landscapes, nothing is too weirdly outré or unimaginable for Weldon’s visual fictions.
Unrestricted by the prohibitive constraints of probability, Weldon’s imagination playfully borrows imagery and kitsch from popular culture – past and present – and recombines its familiar fragments into beautifully strange reconstitutions.

Weldon gambols with the manipulation of scale and contrast to create otherworldly scenes, as though pulled from the cavities of the unconscious and its latent thread-like associations. The works alternate between moments of intense darkness and incandescent light, figuratively and literally. Saturated with lush color and detail, they are stylized by idiosyncratic palette choices that capture a range of brightness and atmosphere, from the intensity of neon to the lambent of dusk and the recesses of twilight obscurity. The unexpected is always at play in the subject matter, as unlikely pairings, exaggerated spatial relationships, and incongruous contexts offer infinite possible realities and suggestive collusions. The world, delivered through the lens of Weldon’s imagination, is distorted on a hyperbolic visual plane, where the mythic proportions of incidental symbolism are laid open to the willing. Weldon creates works with hooks rather than imperatives, providing an openness to interpretation for the viewer rather than a prescriptive demand to be read.

Inspired by the early twentieth century surrealists André Breton and Giorgio de Chirico, Weldon uses similar creative strategies like juxtaposition and stream of consciousness, filtered through a contemporary sensibility, to defamiliarize the familiar and problematize the seemingly innocuous elements of the day to day. Charged with a range of affect that taps into everything from the playful and irreverent to the uncanny and melancholic, his works are beautifully disruptive and galvanized by the unpredictable. Technically, the paintings, though illustrative in style, combine moments of highly-detailed representational realism offset by stylistically surreal interjections. Recurring themes include the exploration of humankind’s tenuous interaction with and coexistence within nature – especially impactful in our era of environmental depletion – and the generative possibilities of extreme displacement and exaggerated context.

Find Us at ComplexCon For Prints from Cinta Vidal and Casey Weldon, Plus So Much More!

ComplexCon Long Beach

This weekend we will be at the POW! WOW! Worldwide booth (H31) at ComplexCon in Long Beach taking place at the Long Beach Convention Center.

Not only will we have a wall of 30 incredible works from our past POW! WOW! exhibitions, but new print editions from Cinta Vidal and Casey Weldon. Artist James Jean has created a site-specific mural and incredible installation presented by POW! WOW! and Imprint Labplus that will have to be seen in person. All those who attend will walk away with a little piece of history from Jean.

Tickets and full details at www.complexcon.com

Look for us at Booth H31

casey-print

Prints will be available at our booth (while supplies last) each day from 11AM to 7PM, look for the bearded guy with the headband and he’ll take care of you.
Thank you for the support!

CASEY WELDON
‘Death Perception’
Edition of 75
16×20 inches (40.6×50.8cm)
Fine art print on 290gsm paper
Signed and numbered by the artist
$75 each

Printed by Static Medium

cinta-print

Prints will be available at our booth (while supplies last) each day from 11AM to 7PM, look for the bearded guy with the headband and he’ll take care of you.
Thank you for the support!

CINTA VIDAL
‘Reading Club’
Edition of 50
18×18 inches (45.7×45.7cm)
Fine art print on 290gsm paper
Signed and numbered by the artist
$75 each

Printed by Static Medium

Remaining prints from each edition will go up on our online shop next week. Details will be shared next Monday via our newsletter and social networks. Thank you.

New Casey Weldon Print Coming Soon!

Casey Wheldon Print

We are releasing a new print by Casey Weldon of his fantastic painting ‘Bright Eyes’. The edition will be available this Friday, August 28th at 10AM PST through the Thinkspace Gallery print website. The original painting is from our recent ‘LAX / SFO’ show that we curated up in San Francisco with our good friends at Hashimoto Contemporary.

Casey Weldon
‘Bright Eyes’
Edition of 75
16×16 inches (40x40cm)
Hand-signed and numbered by the artist
Giclee print on Museo Portfolio Rag Paper
$75

Printed by Static Medium

Order now at www.thinkspaceprints.com