Collector profile: Sheldon Donig

Recently had the pleasure of visiting the home of collector Sheldon Donig. Sheldon’s home in Los Angeles is converted from a 1950’s auto garage (1st photo in the set / updated today – final pic in the set) and still retains one of the original lifts in his living room showing off a couple of his choice collectable autos. One of the best mash ups of pop culture and original art we’ve come across, this visit was a true adventure and we didn’t want to leave! Enjoy the pics.

Fire Dog Lake interview Morgan Spurlock about ‘New Blood’

Morgan Spurlock at home alongside works from Brian M. Viveros and Dalek (aka James Marshall)

Spurlock explains why and how he chose the established artists in the exhibit:
I picked artists who I believe had helped re-shape the art world in some way, artists whose imprint will be felt for decades to come. Each of them have created bodies of work that explore issues of censorship, free speech, human rights, voter’s rights, abandonment, depression, pollution, gun control, corporate & governmental malfeasance, & personal empowerment through art. Through art, you can create a truly inspired conversation and debate that forces us to engage with a topic.

Check out the full interview with Morgan from the good folks at Fire Dog Lake here:
http://tinyurl.com/6srorll

Close up look at one of Dzine's new pieces for 'New Blood'

Take a sneak peek at the show coming to life here:
www.flickr.com/photos/thinkspace/sets/72157629274921834/

‘New Blood’ opens to the public this Sat, April 28th from 5-9PM

Thinkspace / 6009 Washington Blvd. in Culver City, CA / www.thinkspacegallery.com

An interview with collector Chris Ward

The man himself, Chris Ward, in his downtown loft in front of a masterpiece from Todd Schorr

An interview with collector Chris Ward

We have been friends with Chris Ward for a number of years now and his collecting vision is one we really admire. The more we get to know him, the more we click on several levels. Chris is best known as one of the founders of Neversoft – the company that launched the Guitar Hero and Tony Hawk video game franchises and continues to pave new ground in the ever evolving video game industry. When Chris entered the art world he was immediately taken by the works of many leading pop surrealists and since then he’s focused his collecting habits on creating a snap shot of the New Contemporary Art movement. With a keen eye, he’s thus far amassed a very impressive collection featuring many of the movement’s leading players. Ward’s collection includes major works from the likes of Joe Sorren, Camille Rose Garcia, Todd Schorr, Marion Peck, Josh Keyes, Jeff Soto, Dave Kinsey, Glenn Barr, Julie Heffernan, Greg Simkins, Scott Musgrove, Kent Williams, Tim Biskup, Amy Sol, Brian M. Viveros, Ron English, and many, many more. Please read on to find out a bit more about his vision and what he’s on the hunt for in the year ahead, as well as take a look inside his Venice home and downtown LA loft.

Living room view from 2nd floor - works from Soto, Barr, Baseman, Koopman, Mars-1, Musgrove, McGrath, Olivas, and many more on view
One of the main walls in Chris' Venice living room with works from Soto, Lola, Ota, Biskup, Garcia, Musgrove, Mars-1, Shag, and many more

How long have you had an interest in art?
Since I was a young kid. At school I used to draw pages of a comic called “2000 AD” instead of listening to the teacher. The artists were called “artdroids”, a 2000AD term for artist. Artdroids such as Kevin O’Neil (Nemesis), Cam Kennedy (Rogue Trooper), and Massimo Belardinelli (Meltdown Man) really inspired me. Look these guys up, trust me it’ll be well worth. These artists and the comic still influence me today.

Sylvia Ji in the dining room with view into the main living room area
Works from Amy Sol, Josh Keyes, and Marion Peck

Does anyone else in your family collect or create art?
No not really. I think I’m making up for this fact.

Works from KuKula, Yosuke Ueno, Amy Sol, and Dan-ah Kim in the stairwell of Ward's Venice home

Besides art, is there anything else that the collector bug in you searches out regularly?
If we’re talking real collecting, then I tend to just collect one thing at a time. Interestingly each thing I collect has lead and inspired me to the next. I went from collecting Comics, to Metal/Rock albums, to limited edition screen prints (mainly band and concert related), and that lead me to pop surrealism and collecting original works of art. Although at 12 pence each, comics were way cheaper.

The work of Nathan Ota... the artist that gave Ward 'the bug'
Joe Sorren's "The Lonely" in the Venice home of Chris Ward

First piece purchased and when/why?
Haha, that’s testing my memory. I came upon the “Kitchen Sink” exhitbiton at La Luz De Jesus back in April of 2007. I was taken aback by the paintings in the show, and I think I bought half of them. Still have most of them, if not all of those pieces. I discovered one of my favorite artists, Nathan Oto, from that show. My first big purchase was two large prints by Tim Biskup (each a run of 1) and a Joe Sorren piece, “The Lonely”, which is still one of my favorites to this day.

A stunning sculptural work from Colin Christian
A showstopper of a piece from Elizabeth McGrath in his downtown loft space with Bronze from Joe Sorren resting beneath

Do you have any sculpture in your collection?
Yes I do. Scott Musgrove, Joe Sorren ( “Mr. Kurabi’s Tales of Lovely-ness and All Things Eaten” ), and a couple of Liz Mcgrath’s (The Savoy). I just bought a Joe Sorren/Jud Bergeron sculpture called “Headlong”, which is awesome. Those two guys are so talented, haha, as indeed are both Liz and Scott.

A massive work from Julie Heffernan resides in the living room of Ward's Venice home alongside a wall full of magnificent works from our movement

Favorite piece you currently own?
I love them all. But if you were to twist my arm, I’d say my Todd Schorr piece, “When Fairytales Collide”. Many reasons why, but as a collector it’s just such an honor to own one of Todd pieces. For me, it really was the pinnacle as a collector to get the chance to own a Todd Schorr piece. Close behind, would be my Julie Heffernan piece “Self Portrait of Fabulous Droppings “, such an amazing work of art. Also the aforementioned Joe Sorren, which makes me so happy just looking at it.

An early work from Camille Rose Garcia (alongside a prized lamp in his downtown loft)
A strong work from Jeff Soto in his downtown loft space

Biggest regret (that piece you slept on and missed)?
There was a James Jean show in New York that I absolutely loved the pieces. I missed out on all of them… I was gutted. I remember getting the preview and they all just sold before I could get in. And since each of his shows are so different I know I’ll never see the like of that work again. Makes me so sad.

Beautiful new work from Laurie Hogin with a stunner from Joe Sorren residing in the hallway

What was your biggest score of 2009 collecting wise? 2010? Best score to date?
That has to be my Todd Schorr piece, “When Fairytales collide. “. Thank you Merry! Some scores of 2010 have been Laurie Hogin and Ron English. These guys were definitely on my “to get” list of 2010. My collection has changed a little in direction, one might say it got a little more “painterly”. The Kent Williams piece I recently purchased embodies that change in direction.

Works from Ekundayo and Natalia Fabia in upstairs hallway of Ward's Venice home
View of Ward's downtown loft space... works from Garcia and Keyes in the background

Who is at the top of your want list for 2011?
James Jean or David Choe. These guys are top of the 2011 list. Oh, I do want another Joe Sorren too.

Living room view from Ward's downtown loft
Works from Dave Cooper and Adam Wallacavage in the downtown loft

If you could add any piece of artwork to your collection, from any time period, which work would that be?
Well, if I had that power, why stop at one? haha Can I take a time traveling shopping cart with me and have 30 minutes to fill it? I’m super fond of an artist called Arthur Rackham… so he’s my first stop.

Master bedroom view with works from Camille Rose Garcia, Scott Musgrove, Dennis Hayes IV, Elizabeth McGrath, and more (sculpture),
A beautiful piece from Greg 'Craola' Simkins

Curious what your long terms plans are for your collection. Do you ever see yourself stopping? You are still so young and your walls are already filling up, but this is an addiction as we all know…
The walls are indeed already full and overflowing. I’ve already moved on to using my friend’s walls. I don’t ever see myself stopping, only growing and appreciating more different and varied artists. I would like more people to see the art in my collection. This is a big concern of mine as I don’t think art should be hidden. I’m lucky enough to have collected some great pieces. Overall it’s been a great journey. I’ve met people along the way who have inspired and influenced my collection and taste. They hopefully know who they are.

The work of Victor Safonkin in the posh setting of Ward's downtown loft

Please name an artist that might be off many collector’s radar, but that you enjoy and would like to offer some props to.
The artist I’d really like to mention, and whom I have in my collection, is Victor Safonkin (again, thanks Merry). He’s an awesome Russian painter in the old masters mold with a great surrealist tilt. His figures have a very Mother Russia feel. His paintings and design skills have influenced film makers like Guillermo del Toro and Terry Gilliam.

I’d just like to add if it wasn’t for gallery owners like yourself Andrew, I would never have the desire to collect or the collection that I have. It really takes great gallery owners bringing new and inspiring artists to the publics attention, as well as, open-minded collectors to help drive this fantastic art scene. It was and is a special time.

Many thanks to Chris for taking the time to answer these questions and allowing us access to his beautiful homes. Please watch for future collector interviews to be posted here in the months ahead.

An interview with collector Morgan Spurlock

Spurlock alongside a portion of his Ron English collection

An interview with collector Morgan Spurlock

Morgan Spurlock, 39, the man who pushed himself to the brink for the filming of ‘Super Size Me’ by eating nothing else than McDonald’s for a month straight, went to the middle East to film ‘Where In The World Is Osama bin Laden?’ and put himself through a myriad of difficult situations for the FX television series ’30 Days’, finds himself with the same addiction many of us have, the need to fill every inch of his walls with the best from the new contemporary art movement. He recently wrapped up a special he did for Fox for the 20th Anniversary of The Simpsons which took him around the globe, thankfully he was able to find some time during all that to answer a few questions for me about his love for this art movement. When he’s not putting his life at risk and globetrotting about for film projects, he spends his time hunting down that next great piece for his ever-growing collection of new contemporary art. Read on to learn a bit more about how his love for art started and what fuels him to keep collecting.

The work of WK Interact

How long have you had an interest in art?
I think I’ve had an interest in art ever since I was a kid. I used to love to go to museums with my parents. Now they weren’t art aficionados or anything, but they did have a great love and appreciation for the arts: music, dance, painting, you name it. And I think they passed that love down to me.

The work of Souther Salazar

Does anyone else in your family collect or create art?
I was the youngest of three ballet dancing brothers (which, believe me, was not the coolest thing for a kid to be doing where I grew up in West Virginia). Both my brothers went on to become professional dancers and tour with companies before settling down with their families while I went in a different direction.

Office view including works from Baseman, Nouar, Musgrove, and others

Besides art, is there anything else that the collector bug in you searches out regularly?
I’m a film buff, and I love old movie posters, and while my habit has quite reached the magnitude of my art addiction, it’s still pretty bad. I just bought an amazing otiginal Italian color photolithographic halftone poster for Citizen Kane (AKA in Italy as “Quarto Potere.”) It’s incredible … and massive. It’s a two sheet that combines to form the full image and once its framed it will around 7’ x 5’. It would never fit in my house but will proudly be displayed in our new office.

With artists like Mark Ryden, Todd Schorr, Camille Rose Garcia, Shepard Fairey and The Clayton Brothers all having major retrospective museum shows in the past year or two, the future is definitely wide open for this lil’ bubble of the art world. Where do you see this genre of art (new contemporary, urban contemporary, pop surrealism, outsider, lowbrow, etc) going over the next 5-10 years?
I think you’re going to see even more of these artists getting major shows as well as the respect of the art world. Everything has shifted, and with the rise of the street artist will come even more huge break out art stars like David Choe, Ron English, WK Interact, Lori Earley, Shag, Tim Biskup, D-Zine, Swoon, Kathy Schorr, Tim Biskup, Niagara, Van Arno, Scott Musgrove, Ray Caesar, Dalek, Sas and Colin Christian, Caia Koopman, Camilla d’Errico, Esther Pearl Watson and Andy Kehoe.

The work of Josh Agle (aka Shag)

First piece purchased and when/why?
I bought a piece by Francesco Lo Castro in 2005 at a group show in NY at the Lit Gallery. I went to meet Ron English there and was blown away by all the pieces. The painting I bought was a small piece called “Surprise?!” I loved it (and it was in my budget! Something every collector should try to stay within!)

Sculpture from Ron English (with large Dave Cooper in background)

Do you have any sculpture in your collection?
No, but I have a bunch of vinyl by Ron English. I kick myself everyday that I didn’t buy the Colin Christian sculpture at that Lit show where I bought my first piece. It was way out of my range, 12k I think they wanted. Today, you can’t even smell a piece by him for that.

The work of the one and only Niagra

Favorite piece you currently own?
When I took Super Size Me to Sundance, Ron English painted a new version of MC Super Sized for our poster. It ended up being the model for all the vinyls he currently has on the market. I have the original painting hanging behind my desk and it makes me smile every time I look at that fat clown.

The work of Ray Caesar

What was your biggest score of 2009 collecting wise? Best score to date?
My best score of the year is a WK Interact piece that I got on consignment from Jonathan Levine. It’s from when he first started blending painting with prints on canvas (this one is actually mounted on wood) and is a photo print of his old girlfriend writhing in a ecstasy. It’s pretty sexy and may not be the best piece for a work environment, but until I move into a giant Andy Warhol-esque loft, that’s where its gotta live.

And my best score to date? Is probably my second favorite piece in my whole collection. I have an incredible Ray Caesar piece called “Side Saddle” that I got from his show last year at Jonathan Levine Gallery in NYC. I often find myself pausing when I walk past just to drink it in. It’s so twisted and weird and beautiful. One day I’ll be lucky enough to meet him so I can ask him about it. I think that guy is a genius.

The work of Invader

Who is at the top of your want list?
So many people. On the “I have a dream” front, I really want an original Shepherd Fairey as well as a Camille Rose Garcia. It would be amazing to get an original Banksy or Todd Schorr or Blek le Rat or Robert Williams. And who wouldn’t love to have a Mark Ryden.

If you could add any piece of artwork to your collection, from any time period, which work would that be?
Ever since I was a kid, Salvador Dali has been an inspiration to me. We had a book about him in my house and I remember sitting on the floor and thumbing through it, staring in awe at his paintings. The imagery was overwhelming to me. It was the closest thing to magic I’d ever seen. To this day he fascinates and moves me, so if I could have anything, a painting by him would be like having Houdini standing in my kitchen every day of my life.

My wife and I would love to donate our collection to some sort of establishment, be it a museum or otherwise, so that the vision remains intact. We’re really creating a snapshot in time. With this in mind, do you see yourself ever stopping buying art and supporting artists? Even if your walls fill up? You are so young, that it’s bound to happen soon, but this is an addiction as we all know. So just curious of other’s long term plans.
My walls are already filling up. My apartment, office and escape cabin in upstate New York all have the stamp and vision of so many artists on them that I can’t imagine them ever not being around. One day the walls will all be full but I can’t imagine that stopping me. There’s always someone new. Some new way of looking at the world that lights up something inside of me in ways I can’t describe and I just tell myself, “I’ll find a place for it.” There’s always mom’s house in West Virginia.

As for what will happen to my collection when I long gone, I haven’t given it a ton of thought. Right now, if I dance with worms tomorrow, it will go into a trust for my son. But who knows if he will even like the work, he’s only 2 and a half and even though he’s is surrounded by it everyday of his life, he may hate it when he gets older. (And I despise parents who try to force their passions on their kids.) I hope some of it rubs off on him, but if it doesn’t, I can always adopt.

Spurlock alongside WK Interact's Ludlow Street Door

Please name an artist that might be off many collector’s radar, but that you enjoy and would like to offer some props to.
I think Matthew Feyld is amazing. I have three of his paintings and think he’s just starting to hit his stride. I also have become a fan of girl who just graduated from the MFA program at Hunter College named Alison Blickle. Keep your eyes peeled because that girl is going places.

Thanks for taking the time Morgan! Be sure to watch for other collector interviews coming up soon.

An interview with collector Jon Halperin

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An interview with collector Jon Halperin

I first met Jon Halperin a number of years ago just after we opened our gallery and we’ve become good friends since then. Much like myself, he has strong ties to the music world, and we both often make comparisons between the art world and the music world. It’s really amazing how many correlations there are between the two. If you’ve ever met him, it’s undeniable how big a fan he is of the new contemporary art movement, he’s covered head to toe in tattoos featuring the artwork of Futura, Greg Simkins, Banksy, Scott Campbell, Shag, Derek Hess, Huck Gee, Shepard Fairey, Luke Chueh, James Jarvis, Frank Kozik, Murakami, and Joe Ledbetter (lord knows he’s added some more since I interviewed him a month back or so).

Oh, by the way, his dog is named Brooklyn and rules all (you’ll see him in a few pics below).

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His home is much like our own, covered floor to ceiling in art, toys and memorablia – a true treasure trove of pop culture goodness. Please read on…

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How long have you had an interest in art?
I started collecting in the early 1990’s. I used to go to Dark’s Art Parlour in Santa Ana, Soap Plant on Melrose (now La Luz), and a gallery in San Diego. I collected weird stuff…like serial killer art. I was doing my master’s in psychology at the time, so i was super interested in that type of stuff. It quickly moved to low brow in the mid 1990’s. Then to pop in the 2000’s. My collection is around 200 or so pieces at this point…

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Does anyone else in your family collect or create art?
Eh, parents bought art, but it never changed. I like to evolve, change it up, or i get bored. I don’t have a creative bone in my body. It took an hour just to write that sentence….no it didn’t, but it would have been awesome if it did. My grandfather painted cartoonish paintings in the 1960’s, 1970’s.

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Besides art, is there anything else that the collector bug in you searches out regularly?
I ride vespas/lambrettas. So I am regularly on scoot.net and on the search for bikes. I like interesting blogs like coolhunting, stuff like that…I buy items that I like, but don’t necessarilly need. I am anything but a minimalist. I shop at costco.

Otherwise, because I book a music venue, I check out my music blogs/bulletin boards so I know what the hell I’m talking about.

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With artists like Mark Ryden, Todd Schorr, Camille Rose Garcia, Shepard Fairey and The Clayton Brothers all having major retrospective museum shows in the past year or two, the future is definitely wide open for this lil’ bubble of the art world. Where do you see this genre of art (new contemporary, urban contemporary, pop surrealism, outsider, lowbrow, etc) going over the next 5-10 years?
It’s interesting…artists have blown up, but who is taking the torch from Ryden? No one is quite there…maybe it’s the economy dictating…maybe we are in a slight lull, maybe it goes in waves? I really don’t know….

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First piece purchased and when/why?
First piece was given to me by my parents. It was a painting of a bird by my grandfather who had passed away just prior. I love it…..It stands alone in my bathroom. As far as purchase, I really cannot remember…maybe a drawing by Roman Dirge?

Do you have any sculpture in your collection?
I have several pieces by Adam Wallacavage (pictured throughout feature). A chandelier and a wall sconce. I love them more than chocolate…and I f*cking love chocolate.

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Favorite piece you currently own?
Hell. How do you REALLY ask that question? How about ten? Fair? In no particular order:
1. Luke Chueh “I Am Not Your Plaything”
2. D*Face “Lenticular” edition of 80
3. Adam Wallacavage “Covered in Punks Blood” Chandelier
4. Banksy “Morons” sepia print
5. Invader “Onespace” original
6. Miss Bugs “Wonderful Angel of Death” Handfinished AP
7. Shepard Fairey “Sound Clash” original
8. Peter Gronquist “Louise Vuitton Chainsaw”
9. Jeffrey Brown – commission that he did for me as a surprise from my girlfriend
10. Miss Bugs “Don’t F*ck with a Duck Hirst” original

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What was your biggest score of 2009 collecting wise? Best score to date?
Best score to date? Any of my six Banksy prints….I realize that I may not be a lot to some, but I cherish them….
For 2009? Not really a “score”, but for my birthday, my girlfriend bought me the “This Are Two Tone” print by David Storey (http://www.david-storey.co.uk/shop.html). I absolutely freaking love it. He did all of the original art for the Specials and Two Tone Records in the late 1970’s/1980’s.

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Who is at the top of your want list?
Cept. I have a handfinished prints. I want an original.

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If you could add any piece of artwork to your collection, from any time period, which work would that be?
Banksy from 2002-ish. I realize I would appear mensa if I said Picasso or Chagal or something like that. But I am pop as shit. I make Britney Spears look metal.

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My wife and I would love to donate our collection to some sort of establishment, be it a museum or otherwise, so that the vision remains intact. We’re really creating a snapshot in time. With this in mind, do you see yourself ever stopping buying art and supporting artists? Even if your walls fill up? You are so young, that it’s bound to happen soon, but this is an addiction as we all know. So just curious of other’s long term plans.
I am a consumer. I am an addict of art. These pieces are my methodone. I will never stop buying. I put myself into debt now to buy a piece….I would have to be homeless, living off the land before I would stop.

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Please name an artist that might be off many collector’s radar, but that you enjoy and would like to offer some props to.
Cept, David Storey, Meggs, Joe Black, Miss Bugs, and Parker Jacobs

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Any final words or shout outs?
Thanks to both of you and Thinkspace Gallery for existing… you have introduced an incredible amount of artists to Los Angeles.

* First photograph of Jon in the animal suit by Kevin Knight (http://www.theshutterclick.com)

Collector Profile: Gregg and Yvette Spatz

Gregg and Yvette Spatz
Gregg and Yvette Spatz

Interview with collectors Gregg and Yvette Spatz

My wife and I recently had the pleasure of visting the Long Beach area home of long-time collectors Gregg and Yvette Spatz. Their home is a shrine to the work they love and a true inspiration to visit. They collect from many sub-genres of the art world with the main focus of their collection on illustration based works, especially those that have been covers of comics and/or featured in the annual Spectrum books which highlight the best and brightest from the world of fantasy driven art.

Rear view of living room
Rear view of living room
Phil Hale and others
Phil Hale and others
Living room end wall view
Living room end wall view

How long have you had an interest in art?
I have been interested in art ever since I can remember. I took art classes back in Junior high and high school, but sports ended up winning out in the end. I would buy the Boris Vallejo Fantasy calendar every year to hang in my room, because I was interested in body building and Fantasy art and those calendars were the perfect mix of both worlds. I have been lucky enough to own two of his paintings now. The dawn of the computer and the internet is what got my interest going forward with my art collecting to what it is today.

Todd Schorr
Todd Schorr
Dining Room view (with look into living room)
Dining Room view (with look into living room)
Chris Mars
Chris Mars

Does anyone else in your family collect or create art?
No one in my immediate family collects or creates art, but my wife Yvette shares the passion with me. We actually went to art galleries and museums while we were dating and carried the passion into our collecting after we got married. I am so lucky to have a wife that is willing to put up with me spending so much money and time into art. It takes a really special person and you also know that, having Shawn share the art with you too.

Jeremy Geddes
Jeremy Geddes
Den view 2
Den view 2

With artists like Mark Ryden, Todd Schorr, Camille Rose Garcia, Shepard Fairey and The Clayton Brothers all having major retrospective museum shows in the past year or two, the future is definitely wide open for this lil’ bubble of the art world. Where do you see this genre of art (new contemporary, urban contemporary, pop surrealism, outsider, lowbrow, etc) going over the next 5-10 years?
Andrew, I see todays art movement continuing to reach even higher levels. This art movement has shown even with a downed economy it can still move upward and outward. It seems like all the major artists have continued to sell out their shows. There has also been a big jump with illustration and Comic Book artists moving over to the gallery scene. It is their way to do some of the work that they can’t do for publishers. This also helps keep the art movement moving forward and not getting stagnate. I do worry though, about too many galleries opening and causing some of the work out there to get watered down. There are tons of yet to be discovered artists out there, but some are being thrust into the gallery scene when they shouldn’t be.

View of the office
View of the office
Nicoletta Ceccoli
Nicoletta Ceccoli
Brom
Brom

With this genre of art gaining in popularity, price points and awareness, there’s a fear amongst some collectors that what we have held dear and close for so long, may well soon be torn wide open and new collectors and gallery players will start hunting about for ‘the next big thing’. Any feedback to that notion?
Galleries have always looked for the next big thing, but the trend has been getting worse with the advent of the internet. It is just easier today to hunt down talent over the computer without even leaving the gallery or your home. This just increases the competition level between galleries.

Jon Wayshak
Jon Wayshak
View of side wall in living room
View of side wall in living room

First piece purchased and when/why?
The first piece Yvette and I bought together was a Cibachrome print of “Mermaid Dreams” by Wyland and Jim Warren. It was just a beautiful painting and there was no way for us to afford the original. It now hangs on a wall in my parents house. We also have not bought any prints since.

The first major painting we bought was “Allure of Damnation” by Brom. It is just the perfect chick painting! Brom is also one of the best Fantasy artists in the world and we were very lucky he still had this painting available. It has been used for calendars, books and tee shirts.

Lisa Snellings Clark
Lisa Snellings Clark

Do you have any sculpture in your collection?
We do have two great sculptures by local artist Lisa Snellings Clark. her work can be scene in some volumes of the Spectrum series art books. We also own a piece by Ver Mar, a huge green Ogre by Kim Graham and numerous “Day of the Dead” pieces and masks. We also used to collect Mexican folk art.

Simon Bisley
Simon Bisley
Dan Quintana
Dan Quintana

Favorite piece you currently own?
I really can’t say that I have a favorite piece, but can tell who some of my favorite artists are from the collection. This may sound like a cop out, but is not. Each guy has his own unique style and can’t be compared to each other. Brom, Phil Hale, John Jude Palencar, Chris Mars, Todd Schorr, Donato,Jon Foster, Justin Sweet, Boris Vallejo, Julie Bell, Dan Dos Santos, Dave McKean, Alex Gross, Ian Miller and Rick Berry. I hate leaving anybody out, but just can’t name them all.

Phil Hale
Phil Hale
Phil Hale
Phil Hale

What was your biggest score of 2009 collecting wise? Best score to date?
The best scores of 2009 are not even in the house yet. I have a Batman commission coming in July from Phil Hale and an Alex Gross painting arriving whenever I can pay it off (actually it’s arrived since and it’s amazing / pic below – editor). I have been waiting years for Phil’s piece and if you have every seen any of his previous Batman pieces you would know why. He is just a genius of an artist!

Master bedroom view
Master bedroom view

Who is at the top of your want list?
Mark Ryden! His work is the best of illustration mixed with fine art.

Alan Pollack - portrait of the couple decapitated
Alan Pollack – portrait of the couple decapitated

If you could add any piece of artwork to your collection, from any time period, which work would that be?
“The Creatix” by Mark Ryden. I was able to see this painting a couple of times and it was the best one for just too many reasons to name.

View of main wall in their den
View of main wall in their den
Dave Cooper
Dave Cooper

I know you are a huge fan of comic book and graphic novel derived work and are a huge follower of the Spectrum series. There is such a wealth of amazing talent in the illustration field, just aching to be discovered and shown in proper gallery spaces. Name one artist that might be off the radar of most, but that has consistently blown your mind and you feel is worth a shout out.
I just can’t name one. I just keep discovering new illustration guys all the time. Some of these guys are new and some may have been around for a while, but keep a lower profile. Wade Furlong (a comic book guy that has his own very unique style. Also was just accepted to be in this years Spectrum), Jon Wayshak (been doing comic book work lately, but not afraid to push the envelope with his style or visions), Chris Rahn (does some very nice gaming art using oils or digital), Michael Ryan (very nice spooky oils). Just get a copy of the last few issues of Spectrum and see how many great artists there are out there. It will blow you away! I need to give a huge shout out to Arnie and Cathy Fenner for doing such a brilliant job of publishing that series! It has been very instrumental for our collection.

Mia
Mia
Alex Gross
Alex Gross

View more pics of the works in their collection via the below link:
http://www.munchkinpress.com/cpg149/thumbnails.php?album=7

Dave McKean
Dave McKean
David Stoupakis
David Stoupakis

The next collector profile will be published shortly. Stay tuned, we’ve some great interviews in the works.

Recent additions to our collection…

Clayton Brothers "Jack Fruit" / 3.75x5" / Mixed media on paper
Clayton Brothers "Jack Fruit" / 3.75x5" / Mixed media on paper
Clayton Brothers "Amra" / 3.75x5" / Mixed media on paper
Clayton Brothers "Amra" / 3.75x5" / Mixed media on paper
Thomas Doyle "The Reprisal"
Thomas Doyle "The Reprisal"
Thomas Doyle "The Reprisal" - close up view 2 / mixed media
Thomas Doyle "The Reprisal" - close up view 2 / mixed media
Travis Louie - custom Kokeshi doll
Travis Louie - custom Kokeshi doll
Kelly Vivanco "Handfuls" / Acrylic on wood / 10.5x21"
Kelly Vivanco "Handfuls" / Acrylic on wood / 10.5x21"

Needless to say we haven’t been behaving ourselves, but there’s just too much great art out there. We also recently added a beautiful piece from Sarah Joncas to our collection that she gave to us as a thank you for her recent solo show with us. I’ll be posting up a picture of that once it comes back from the framers.

Keeping our fingers crossed for a nice piece from Josh Keyes to accompany our two smaller works we have from the man. Big shows at Swarm and LeVine are coming up quick.

Speaking of not being able to behave, look for a new collector interview to be posted here next week. We got an amazing reaction to the 1st one and many more are getting wrapped up as I type. Some great ones coming up.