Fuco Ueda & Small Works Opening Reception

The opening reception of Fuco Ueda’s “Odd Eye” was a beautiful exhibition to close out the year, as our Small Works Holiday Group show was a visual celebration of some of the talented artists we worked with this year. With holiday parties, shopping, and end of year project(s) wrapping up we are grateful to those who chose to spend their Saturday night with us in Culver City. We are excited for 2017 and all the amazing work we will be able to share with our amazing supporters.

Make sure to come in and see Fuco Ueda’s work now until December 31st. Please note that pieces from the small works show will be available for pickup at the gallery on Friday, December 23rd. And lastly, we will be closed Saturday, December 24th to spend time with our families.

Thank you again for another fantastic year!

Upcoming Exhibition at Thinkspace Gallery – Allison Sommers’s ‘Bruxism’

Allison Sommers Postcard

Allison Sommers
Bruxism

September 17, 2016 – October 8, 2016

(Los Angeles) – Thinkspace is pleased to present Bruxism, a solo exhibition of new works by Brooklyn-based artist Allison Sommers. In her sixth exhibition with the gallery, Sommers presents new mixed-media works that veer increasingly towards an expressionistic abstraction of the figurative. Known for her imaginative and irreverent worlds of creature curiosities and disobedient bodies, Sommers conveys an irrepressible disquiet through an undoing and upended capsizing of skins. Anatomically impressionistic, and at times barbaric, her renderings of bodies and humanoid animals appear in a state of troubling excess, rupturing through the flawed boundaries of their outsides. She presents us with a nightmarish vision of embodiment, reminding us of the body’s impermanence and mortal failure while revealing the uncomfortable beauty of the abhorrent.

Sommers’ vaguely apocalyptic world is aesthetically fraught and anxiety-ridden. Simultaneously gestural and painstakingly contained, a sustained tension emerges between the loose and the drawn, the chaotic and the controlled. Evocative and symbolically open-ended, her imagery evolves through exhaustive sketchbooks and the wrought work of constant mark making. Though familiar, her creatures are at far enough of a remove from the real to evade heavy-handed horror. The surreal proportions of the grotesque keep the imagery on another, more poetically licentious, plane. Seductive and simultaneously pained, Sommers’ world of viscera loosely intermingles violence with calm, the sacred with the profane, and the hideous with the alluring. The brutality of the flesh is an unavoidable precondition of the self, in both its violence and vulnerability, a theme that continues to seep from her work.

Sommers describes her process as one of frenetic distillation, a constant consumption and extraction of experience and influence. Working across a variety of media, she creates installation and sculptural-based works from found materials and altered remnants alongside her two-dimensional pieces. Starting from sketchbook drawings, Sommers builds her paintings through the accretion of marks and materials, layering drawing in various media such as graphite, copier pencil, wax crayon, china marker, magic marker, ballpoint pen and fountain pen, and interspersing these with layers of gouache, her preferred painting medium.

A former history major fascinated by 18th,19th and early 20th, Century historical and cultural themes, Sommers’ work has become decreasingly narrative-based over the years in favor of a more interpretative exploration of its various inheritances. She is interested in what she has called the “scale of grief” in the interwar period, a legacy of existential distress explored by the likes of Francis Bacon, George Grosz, and Otto Dix, all of whom she identifies as influences. Sommers invokes this dissociative experience of the body as a philosophically fractured, psychically incohesive, and ultimately disjointed vessel for the self. Though she dissuades an overly prescribed interpretation of her work, preferring to keep it loosely associative, Sommers’ references and allusions are complex and nuanced.

Among the themes explored by Sommers in Bruxism are the consuming compulsions and wasting momentums of anxiety, the repetitive and forced nature of nostalgia, and the imperfect and unresolved nature of embodiment. In keeping with her preference for references that function as thematic “scaffolding,” her title refers to “bruxing” the term given to the compulsive grinding of a horse’s teeth.

 New Works by Allison Sommers

New Works by Allison Sommers

New Works by Allison Sommers

New Works by Allison Sommers

Interview with Curiot for “Act 1: Warped Passage”

interview with curiot

Thinkspace Gallery is proud to present Curiot’s solo exhibition Act 1: Warped Passages, in the gallery’s main room. In anticipation for the show, we have an exclusive interview with Curiot that is a soundbite into the artist’s mind. Short and sweet; discover the inspiration behind the show, a symbolic day in the studio, and what he wishes was invented.

SH: Last year in an interview with The Hundreds, you go into detail about your California upbringing and wanting to move to Mexico, care to share some of that story with our readers here?
C: Yeah, after high school I wasn’t doing much so I decided to move back to Mexico and ended up studying art.

Curiot New Work

Curiot New Work

SH: You’ve mentioned that you’re outside environment and Mexican culture strongly inspires your work, is your studio a blank slate or do you surround yourself with inspiration within the studio as well?
C: I just go with the flow with whatever interests me at the moment. The work itself takes me down different paths, just try to stay open as possible.

SH: What is the inspiration or narrative behind the current exhibition?
C: The strangeness of life and this question of what is real, are we all just part one highly elaborate simulation? Some little kids project from some super advanced race haha.

Curiot New Work

SH: A handful of your pieces involve mixed media and elements of folk art, like weaving or carpentry, did you collaborate on those pieces or teach yourself the trades?
C: I like to make everything myself but there are some exceptions, like the pieces I’ve made in the past that incorporate knitting, my friend Julieta helped me out with that. I try to learn as many skills as I can so I have full control over the creative process.

SH: What does a day in the studio look like?
C: Like a leaf in a pond

Curiot New Work

SH: Your pieces involve a lot of detail from subtle shifts in tones and to different patterns, is it safe to say your process is almost meditative?
C: Very, it’s what I love the most, the loss of time and the thought process that surges from that state.

SH: Favorite Mexican folktale?
C: Popol Vuh, so good!

Curiot New Work

SH: The beasts in your work possess a god like quality and interaction with the human-like figures in your work, can you elaborate on the dynamic of these creatures to the rest of the world they inhabit? Or outline what their presence symbolizes?
C: Always considered them as creatures from the spirit realm.

SH: Favorite Color?
C: It’s always fluctuating, right now it’s lavender before it was indigo haha

SH: What do you wish was invented? Would it help your artwork, your life, or the world?
C: A real fucking spaceship! None of this rocket bs. Let’s see what’s out there!

Curiot New Work

Please join us this Saturday, May 28th from 6-9pm for the Opening Reception of Act 1: Warped Passage. The show will not only feature a collection of new paintings but two new digital editions and an adventurous installation component, including musical accompaniment from Franz (Pira MD Records).   To catch a sneak peak of what is happening inside the gallery, add us on snapchat at thinkspace_art , as we’ve already shared Curiot shopping through yards and yards of brightly colored fabric. What could he be making?

 

Kwon Kyung-yup “Melancholia” and Matthew Grabelsky “Underground” Opening Reception Recap

Kwon Opening Reception

New York meets Korea in our latest exhibition with artists Kwon Kyung-yup and Matthew Grabelsky.  Kwon’s “Melancholia” took over Thinkspace Gallery’s main room creating a beautiful stillness to absorb and take in her latest body of work. In the project room Grabelsky’s “Underground” brought the bustling stories that exist within (what at times is) the most mundane moments, riding public transit. Both exhibitions are on view through May 21st, the juxtaposition of their stories to be experienced in person. Please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website to view all available works from Underground and Melancholia.

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

comp-3873  Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

comp-3915

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Matthew Grabelsky "Underground" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Kwon Kyung-yup "Melancholia" Opening Reception

Opening reception photos courtesy of Bryan “Birdman” Mier.

 

 

Thinkspace Presents New Works by Amy Sol for “Garden Gamine”

Amy Sol Postcard

Thinkspace is pleased to present Garden Gamine, featuring new works by Amy Sol. Born in Korea, where she spent much of her childhood, Sol now lives and works in Las Vegas, NV. A self-taught artist, she has developed and refined an intuitive technique over many years, mixing her own unique pigments and mediums to create signature palettes, and working primarily in thinly layered acrylic on wood panel. Her illustrative paintings and works on paper are dreamy and beautifully stylized. An artist whoembraces the Golden Age of illustration’s simple expression of narrative, Sol’s concise work perfects visual storytelling with fantastic imagery.

Sol is known for her paintings of graceful nymph-like girls and their sympathetic animal companions. Fundamentally a storyteller, her images capture surreal encounters, moments, and characters. Her figures seem suspended in dreamlike states, arrested in thoughtful and meditative trances. The ambiguous postponement of time and action in the works contributes to their otherworldliness; they are somehow nostalgic and frozen, like glimpses into a fabled past or a mythic, narrative dimension. Owing to this feeling of whimsical detachment and playful idealization, her imagery conveys an almost childlike sensibility. Though Sol explores imaginative themes that fascinated her in her childhood, she incorporates a subtle element of melancholy, a quiet shadow of adult sadness and reserve to deepen and offset the overall tone of the works.

amy sol new work

Inspired by a variety of graphic and artistic traditions, Amy Sol combines several aesthetic influences in her imagery. Among them, she cites Japanese Manga, Korean folk-art, Celadon ceramics, Japanese Studio Ghibli animation, Disney, and vintage 19th century and early 20th century illustration. Among the Golden Age era of illustrators she admires are Arthur Rackham, known for his phenomenally detailed line work and silhouette cuts, and Kay Nielsen, an early 20th century Danish, Art Nouveau illustrator who eventually created for early Disney. Her understated palettes, use of natural imagery, and preference for graphic and linear detail attest to her love of early vintage illustration, while her cartoon-like animal companions and their surreal, childlike encounters, reveal an affinity for stylized comics. The combination is undeniably spellbinding.

The dreamscapes in which Sol’s characters find themselves tend to be sparse, abstract, and atmospheric, contributing to an overall sense of surreal dislocation. Preferring to paint on wood panel for its smoothness and organic texture, Sol balances the linear and graphic quality of her aesthetic with a feeling of softness, flow, and warmth. Her custom palettes are entirely her own, and in this new body of work she continues to explore the possibilities of monochromatic ranges, moving away from golden muted sepias to the incorporation of warmer, and more saturated, pink and purple hues.

Join us for the opening reception of Amy Sol’s “Garden Gamine” Saturday, April 2nd from 6 to 9 pm.  The show will be on view through April 23.

Thinkspace Family on Instagram : “DUO” Edition

Thinkspace Gallery in collaboration with Berlin’s Urban Nation is pleased to present DUO, a group exhibition featuring works by internationally acclaimed contemporary art duos: Best/Ever, Cyrcle, Jana & JS, Nevercrew, Snik, Telmo Miel, and Yok & Sheryo.

As a special edition of our Thinkspace Family on Instagram series, the following accounts are of the talented artists in the exhibition. We invite you to the opening reception for “DUO” tonight Saturday, February 27th from 6-9pm and runs to March 19th.

The Instagram accounts below are in the following order;  Nevercrew, The Yok, Sheryo, Jana and JS, Telmo Miel, Snik, Cyrcle, Best/Ever. To view more of each artist’s Instagram account click their username next to the profile picture.

 

@bedrockla studios EchoPark still Rollin . Photo @the1point8 Circa 2012 #cyrcle #magicisreal

A photo posted by cyrcle (@cyrcle) on

Opening Night of Christine Wu’s “Sleepless” & Linnea Strid’s “Love Me When I’m Gone”

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

New York-based artist Christine Wu and Swedish painter Linnea Strid packed Thinkspace Gallery on opening night, January 23, for their exhibitions “Sleepless” and “Love Me When I’m Gone”.  The gallery’s main room showing Christine Wu exhibits new work and includes a hanging installation of broken dishes; symbolic of the frustration, satisfaction, and swift remorse gained from such a spontaneous action.

Linnea Strid’s new body of work in Thinkspace Gallery’s project room is a collection of artists who sent in their images submerged or drenched in water for Linnea to paint. A collaborative effort as Linnea did not direct the artists in how to take their photo, many of the artist she worked with on the pieces showed up for the opening. You can read more about her inspiration for the show in our interview with the artist.

Both exhibitions will be on view till February 20th, please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website for additional details.

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Opening Reception Linnea Strid

Opening Reception Linnea Strid

Opening Reception Linnea Strid

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

Christine Wu and Linnea Strid Opening Reception

 

Aaron Nagel in Thinkspace Office

Aaron Nagel’s work is concurrently on view in the Thinkspace office. He was surprised to have come to the show for Linnea and Christine, and find he had his own mini-exhibit in our office. You can view additional photos from the night on our Flickr account and Facebook page.

PRESS + Additional Photos

Arrested Motion: Linnea Strid – “Love Me When I’m Gone”