Stella Im Hultberg’s “Hollow Resonance” Opens November 12th

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Stella Im Hultberg
“Hollow Resonance”
November 12 – December 3

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room is Hollow Resonance, featuring new works by Stella Im Hultberg. Born in South Korea and now based in Portland, OR, Hultberg’s career began in industrial design. A self-taught painter, she has also worked in sculpture, creating objects based on motifs explored in her two-dimensional works. Hultberg’s mixed-media practice includes drawings and paintings in ink, watercolor, and oils on paper, wood, and canvas. Playing with varying qualities of opacity and translucency, in her application and interaction of these mediums, she creates works that vary in tone from dreamy and ethereal to bold and delineated.

Hultberg’s lyrical depictions of women combine decorative elements and graphic patterns, melding the figurative with the illustrative and a looser more painterly component. Ever present, this tension between the gestural and the controlled describe space in her dynamic compositions. Her palettes tend towards the monochromatic, moody and dark, but are punctuated by moments of contrast and vibrancy.

Her mannered figurative style, both elegant and selectively awkward, is at times reminiscent of early 20th century artists like Egon Schiele, Aubrey Beardsley or Gustav Klimt. Though beautiful, her figures are strangely displaced, subtly distorted, and at times melancholically encumbered with ornamentation, as seen in a recent series in which her nudes are laden with heavy blooms. Darkly beautiful, Hultberg’s feminine imaginary is an ambiguous terrain of melancholic desire.

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Jeremy Fish, Jim Houser, and Troy Lovegates Opening Reception

Opening Reception of Jeremy Fish, Troy Lovegates, Jim Houser

This past Saturday our gallery was filled with the creative and colorful personalities of Jeremy Fish, Jim Houser, and Troy Lovegates. This merry band of artists brought into the gallery their latest body of work commenting on their observations and interpretations of life as they see it, their compositions always filled with a sprinkle of humor and a dash of sarcasm. You can view all available works from Jeremy Fish, Jim Houser, and Troy Lovegates on the Thinkspace Gallery website. We invite you to come see the current exhibition Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6pm, on view until July 16th.

Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception Jeremy Fish Opening Reception

Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Jim Houser Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception

Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception Troy Lovegates Opening Reception

Photos are courtesy of Birdman Photography.

Jeremy Fish Opening Reception

New Works by Jeremy Fish and Jim Houser featured on Juxtapoz

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Juxtapoz featured our upcoming exhibition of new works by Jeremy Fish and Jim Houser online, hop on over to their website and read the full write up and get ready for Saturday!

Two phenomenally influential and distinctively stylized artists, Jeremy Fish, and Jim Houser both came to their love of art making through drawing, music, and skate culture. – Juxtapoz

Interview with Jim Houser for his Upcoming Exhibition

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Jim Houser will be showing his latest body of work alongside Jeremy Fish in their upcoming exhibition opening Saturday, June 25th. Jim Houser’s work is an analysis of self and the world, stripped of pretense and broken down into its most simplistic form of communication. In turn creating work that is both playful and thought-provoking. Our interview with Jim Houser discusses the inspiration behind this latest body of work, his thoughts on the art world, and a basic day in the life of this Philadelphia artist.

SH: What is the inspiration or narrative behind the latest body of work ?
JH: It is all just continued self-examination , but hopefully has elements to it that are universal and that people can relate to. Looking back over what I have made over the last few months, my health comes up a lot in there. My son has started to work his way more and more into things, I think maybe appropriating ideas of how he sees things. Also, there’s some meditation in the work about the work itself, the how and why I make what I make.

Jim Houser New Work

SH: How do you work through creative blocks and self-doubt?
JH: I make work because of that stuff, not despite it. It seems like the periods where I feel good about myself and my work is usually when I sit back and rest. That zone of feeling frustrated and or anxious is kind of a sweet spot for getting things out for me, unfortunately.

SH: As you are showing alongside Jeremy Fish, what are a few of your favorite aspects of his works?
JH: His craftsmanship and attention to detail. I constantly see things from Jeremy that boggle my mind from a technical standpoint. And also his work ethic, he is incredibly prolific.

Jim Houser New Work

SH: You’ve been a part of the New Contemporary Art movement for well over a decade, what are your feelings about the movement, your place in it, and where it is headed ?
JH: The older I get, the less energy or interest I have to look around at what direction that stuff takes. I just do my thing and keep my head down, really.  As far as my place in anything goes, if I am thought of as a good person who makes honest work then that is really all I could ask for.

Jim Houser New Work

SH: Your work possess different reoccurring symbols that connect to deeper meanings, care to elaborate on any of the “regulars”? Definitely, tell us a lil’ about my favorite, the Lurker please.
JH: The Lurker references those feelings of doubt and anxiety that you referred to, for the most part. But most of those reoccurring icons have multiple meanings.

SH: Your work has been described as visual poems, do you have a favorite poet? If not, do you have a favorite author?
JH: No, I don’t have a favorite poet. In fact, I like writing poetry but don’t really enjoy reading formal poetry as such . I’m drawn to a particular type of poetic prose,  like a specific type of well crafted evocative sentence. It’s hard for me to put a finger on exactly what that is. But if I find three or 4 of them in a book, then to me that’s a pretty good book. As far as what I like to read, I read a lot of science fiction and historical non-fiction.

Jim Houser New Work

SH: When did you first find your artistic voice, when did it all click? How have you grown over the years?
JH: Man, I don’t know. I’ve written and drawn my whole life. I guess once I noticed that other people were drawn to what I made and were responding to it? Maybe my mid -twenties ? But iIdon’t feel any differently about what I make now than I did when I was 10 years old .

SH: Your work has a playfulness to it and you’re very open about sharing your son’s artistic aptitude, has he influenced any of your work?
JH: I think the playfulness people perceive may come from trying to execute an idea in the simplest way possible. Even my more complicated paintings are just a collection of single simple thoughts. In a lot of ways, the best things my son makes or does will capture that concept perfectly. I’ll look at things he draws and think never in a million years would I be able to pare things down to that, and yet here it is .

Jim Houser New Work

SH: What is the biggest misconception about being an artist?
JH: It makes me sad when people refer to themselves at “not artistic”, but in the same breath they can prepare a spectacular meal or use some novel way to fix their car or their water heater. Everyone is creative, it’s part of the human condition.

SH: What does a day in the studio look like and your creative process?
JH: Get the kid ready for school, get him out the door. I usually work from 9am -1pm then eat something and take a nap. Seamus gets home at 3pm and we hang out until Jess gets home at 7pm. We eat dinner as a family. Once he is in bed, I work some more , 8-10pm. That’s a pretty standard day.

Jim Houser New Work

For more information on the exhibition please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website. The opening reception is from 6 – 9pm on Saturday, June 25th.

Interview with Jeremy Fish for his Upcoming Exhibition

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How many living artists have a whole day dedicated to them? Not very many. But, Jeremy Fish officially has his own day in San Francisco, and that’s really rad. So we’re incredibly excited to be exhibiting Jeremy Fish’s latest body of work in his upcoming exhibition opening June 25th alongside Jim Houser. Below is our exclusive interview with Jeremy Fish discussing his creative process,  role in the new contemporary art movement, and spirit animal.

SH: What is the inspiration or narrative behind the latest body of work?
JF: This body of work was initially inspired by writing a list of things that I love about Los Angeles, while laying on a beach in Hawaii. Mainly concepts and characters from music, film, television, and pop culture from the 70’s and 80’s. As well as some narratives about friends or personal experiences in LA from my past. These works are very playful, lighthearted and based in fantasy, which was a much-needed change from my last few projects. The vehicles, their spirit animals, the traffic, the freeways, the smog, hills, valleys, mountains, deserts and beaches of Southern California, blended gently with Italian espresso and served over ice with a twist of citrus, and a medicated cookie.

Jeremy Fish New Work Hef Spicol

SH: How do you work through creative blocks and self-doubt?
JF: Change my scenery, more caffeine, a nap, a fierce sandwich, long walks, a van or scooter adventure, extensive hugging, softer fabrics, 100 beers, new sneakers, fine nectars, and or extremely potent extracts can all suitable cures to both problems at different times.

SH: As you are showing alongside Jim Houser, what are a few of your favorite aspects of his works?
JF: I have been a fan of Jim for a long time. I admire his color palette and unique compositions, as well as his reoccurring cast of clever characters and symbols. When I think of Philadelphia, I think of Rocky, The Roots, Ricky Oyola, and Jim Houser. Legendary Philly dudes.

New Work Jeremy Fish The Vantel

SH: You’ve been a part of the New Contemporary Art movement for well over a decade, what are you feelings about the movement, your place in it, and where it is headed?
JF: I have a very large brain aneurysm, and I think the answers to this question are what helped to form it. Honestly, I am more inspired by music, food, film, and day to day life, than I am by contemporary visual art. My art movement will be made up of skilled chefs, barbers, long bearded wizards, bartenders, rappers, wordsmiths, comedians, creeps, cutthroat kooks, old vehicle enthusiasts, sidewalk surfers, and me.

New Work Jeremy Fish The Snoop

 

SH: How has San Francisco helped to shape you as an artist?
JF: I moved to San Francisco in 1994, and it was a magical creative recipe at that time in the Bay Area. I was lured out from Albany New York for art school at SFAI. But also to study the underground genius of Del, Casual, Souls of Mischief, Saafir, Dug One, Barry Mcgee, Mike Giant, Todd Francis, Think Skateboards, Slap Magazine, DLX, FTC, Last Gasp, Juxtapoz, 111 Minna, The Luggage Store, ect ect ect. The mid 90’s in SF was a cultural gold rush of talent, and I soaked it all in like a sponge. My style was heavily influenced by that time period, as well as the R. Crumb, Rick Griifin, and Victor Moscoso era of psychedelic rock posters and comic art from the 60’s and 70’s.

SH: When did you first find your artistic voice, when did it all click? How have you grown over the years?
JF: I found my artistic voice while working for Think Skateboards and Slap Magazine in the late 90’s -early 2000’s. That was my last full-time job, and I have been using that voice to yell loud as fuck ever since. I went from sleeping in a storage closet to recently having the Mayor of San Francisco proclaim November 19th is officially “Jeremy Fish” day here in SF. My work and I have grown strictly by working my ass off drawing pictures non-stop for 22 years in the most expensive city in America.

New Work Jeremy Fish Quiver

SH: Describe the perfect day in San Francisco?
JF: every day all day since day one!

SH: What is the biggest misconception about being an artist?
JF: That we are all lazy and ugly. Fortunately, there are a few exceptions.

SH: What does a day in the studio look like, what are you favorite tools/materials?
JF: For the last year or so, my days are spent out enjoying the city, taking meetings, running errands, administrative bullshit, and lavish long lunches. Night time is the right time in my studio. I sit down with a coffee at 4 or 5pm, and work until 3 or 4am depending. I do woodworking and outdoor projects during the day, but my studio time is usually in the wee hours when everyone wholesome is asleep. My favorite tools are pencils, pens, paper, and a Storz and Bickel Mighty.

 

SH: What is your spirit animal and why?
JF: When I was a tiny kid it was a frog, because my mom made me a killer frog costume. When I was a young man it was a bunny rabbit, because I jumped around and was quick on my feet. Now that I am 42, I am more of a wizard tortoise, because I move slowly but I make power moves.

New Work Jeremy Fish Maltz Grizzney

 

For more information on the exhibition please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website. The opening reception is from 6 – 9pm on Saturday, June 25th.