ALVARO NADDEO Alvaro Naddeo’s “Not Forgotten” Opens at Thinkspace Gallery September 30th

ALVARO NADDEO
NOT FORGOTTEN
September 30 – October 21, 2017

Concurrently on view in the project room is Not Forgotten, featuring new works by Los Angeles-based Alvaro Naddeo. Originally from São Paulo, Brazil, Naddeo is a self-taught painter whose work explores all manner of objects drawn from the various urban environments that have shaped his memory and imagination. Autobiographical in nature, the work contains symbolic references to his own nomadic past and his transitions through the landscapes of several different cities and countries.

Much of Naddeo’s work focuses on his societal concern over rampant consumption and waste, as well annexation and poverty, depicting accumulations of objects and detritus drawn from the city. Not Forgotten is Naddeo’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. A 20-year veteran in advertising and art direction, Naddeo has reapplied himself to the creation of his own work after a substantial hiatus. Creating primarily with watercolor on paper, the level of detail he can convey captures the humanity of these inanimate urban remnants with true soul, tinged with a subtle feeling of melancholy and loss.

Interview with So Youn Lee for “Limpid”

Thinkspace is proud to present So Youn Lee’s newest body of work ‘Limpid’ in our project room this Saturday, January 7th. The San Francisco-based artist creates a pastel-colored filled world of whimsy as her character Mango explores Lee’s analys of emotions. In anticipation of her upcoming exhibition with us, we have an exclusive interview with So Youn Lee to discuss her inspiration, Mango’s fruition to being, a day in the studio, and so much more.

Join us at the opening of ‘Limpid’ Saturday, January 7th from 6 to 9 pm. 

SH: What is the inspiration behind your latest body of work?
SYL: Limpid is a body of work inspired by the concept of nostalgia. I was visualizing the emotional perceptions of nostalgia in my paintings. It molds certain moods for the character and color scheme for this body of work. Light green and soft-gelatin like clear textures which reminds me of whimsical time in youth.

SH: Can you explain who Mango is and how Mango came to be?
SYL: Mango is a fruit as you know, and I call my characters ‘Mango’ in my colored works. I got inspired by its color, texture, and taste. When I first started to draw my new character, it looked so weird to me but senselessly cute. It reminds me of my very first encounter with the taste and textures of a Mango. The texture was so foreign but so delicious at the same time.

SH: What is your creative process? Walk us through a day in the studio?
SYL: I have my regular studio time after breakfast Monday to Friday. I go out for inspiration hunting and relax on the weekends. If I have to create new work, I start from sketches on scratch paper to transfer a composition according to the images that I already have in my mind when I think of the concept or subject. It’s like I excavate visual responses from my mind about the subject on a drawing/ painting surface in physical world. When the sketch is done, I transfer it on a painting surface that I love to use whether canvas or panel.

SH: People have described your work as innocent, how do you feel about that description? What does innocence mean to you?
SYL: I consider it as compliment, when I think of the term ‘innocent’ it feels like there’s pure potential to be or to do anything we like to do. So if my work evokes those feelings to the audience, I am happy and I’m glad it gives a positive image and feeling to the audience that sees it.

SH: What is your favorite childhood memory? What aspects of childhood do you think help us to navigate the adult world?
SYL: I use to love spending time in nature by myself as a child, imagining many beautiful and weird things. Those imaginations helped me to become a person to work in a creative field. The freedom that we have had to explore things in our own ways in childhood could influence and mold us as an adult.

SH: How has your artistic style developed over the years?
SYL: I was lucky to have had many shows the past three years, I’ve learned more things about my own desires as an artist. It has affected me to try different mediums and approaches in my paintings.

SH: What do you enjoy doing when not painting?
SYL: Reading, playing with Choco and relaxing when I have a chance.

SH: What do the helmets represent in your work?
SYL: In this show, I don’t have any artwork with a helmet. I paint helmets when figures from two different worlds meet in one space in my paintings. The helmet is a symbol of being open-minded to understand someone or something beyond prejudice and perception or see things from a different perspective.

SH: What excites you about another artist’s work? What makes you a fan and can you share a few people we should look up?
SYL: I admire artists who have very distinctive visions and evoke strong emotional presence in their works. There are so many, and most of them, you must know them already. My all time favorite is Yoshitomo Nara.

SH: How long does one piece take to complete? Do you work on multiple pieces at a time?
SYL: It really depends on the size and medium. Yes, I have a tendency to work on multiple pieces at a time.

SH: Kicking off the year with an exhibition seems like a solid way to start the year, what are a few of your goals for 2017?
SYL: I will continue to do my best to improve myself as an artist and travel more.

Next Up at Thinkspace Gallery : Sean Mahan’s exhibition “Rendered Problematic”

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SEAN MAHAN
Rendered Problematic
October 15 – November 5, 2016

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room is Rendered Problematic, featuring new works by Sean Mahan. A mixed media painter from Florida, Mahan creates soft and subtle figurative works in graphite and acrylic washes on wood panel. A cultivated nostalgia persists in his paintings, as shadowy images of picturesque and serene children in light pastel and vintage palettes handle records, dated appliances, and classic sewing machines. The wood grain is preserved with a quality of transparency throughout, adding a dimension of warmth and organic variance to the works.

Mahan’s aesthetic conveys a human innocence and captures a strange sweetness, creating a feeling of quietude. His portraits convey an ambiguity of time and place; it’s a world of analog hand making and pre-digital youth, one of childhood simplicity unmarred by adult disillusionment. The consumption, impermanence, and disposable quality of modern culture is far from these idyllic scenes of contemplative pause.

The object figures prominently as both an implement and subject in his imagery, suggesting its primary role in the formation of identity. His works celebrate the outdated and obsolete by representing older technologies, objects, and cultural ideals in an attempt to interrupt the alienating, and dominant, momentums of discard and overuse.

Despite this seemingly idyllic staging in each piece, its stylized omissions point to a more complex set of issues. Mahan is interested in the formation of identity in normative culture, and the reductive imperatives that circumscribe it. Absent are any indications of that prescriptive outside world in his works. The subjects themselves are independent, suspended in an immaterial environment and displaced within the panel in the absence of defined physical space. This spatial ambiguity and sparsity contribute to a feeling of melancholy throughout, as though the images themselves offer an impossible beauty.

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Interview with Ozabu for 彷徨 (Wander)

Ozabu Interview

Next Saturday, Japanese artist Ozabu will be exhibiting her latest body of work at Thinkspace Gallery in the project room. Ozabu’s graphite drawings are highly rendered with subtle line work leaving a weightless ghost on the paper. Our interview with Ozabu for 彷徨 (Wander) is slightly edited to compensate for the language barrier but gives insight into her self-taught discipline and if she drinks coffee or tea.

SH: As a self-taught artist, what motivated you to pursue a life in the arts and what books or techniques did you study to develop your own artistic style?
OZ: My parents are a big influence and introduce me to art. They like drawing and love art, so we’d often go to museums and draw together at the park when I was a child. But as I grew older, I became less interested in drawing. Then about 5 years ago, I suddenly was inspired to try drawing again and realized I did not have the skill to draw as I wish I could. So, I decided to start again from that point on. I’m attracted to the profundity express in graphite and now here I am.

I didn’t use any reference books to learn drawing. I’ve never researched what kind of techniques or tools other artist use. I would just see a piece in person and then analyze it, teaching myself the technique and trying out different tools until I understand how the piece was created myself.

Ozabu Wander 1

SH: What is the inspiration or theme behind this latest body of work?
OZ: I’ve always pulled inspiration from the things that I’ve felt and my experience with a bit of Japanese extract. I experienced the death of an important person in my life around the time I started working on this show. So the pieces in the exhibition include funeral and parting scenes. I felt that the more I drew, that dark place within myself is what was brought up when drawing those pieces.

SH: Many of your pieces involve birds or feathers the elements adding movement and dimension to the work. Are the birds and feathers also symbolic?
OZ: Yes. They possess something that I don’t have. I don’t know why, but they’ve always fascinated me very much.

SH: What are your favorite tools to work with?
OZ: Mechanical pencil and pencil of Staedtler and Pentel

Ozabu Tsuibami

SH: What is a common mistake people make with drawing?
OZ: That they don’t put their emotions into the drawing.

SH: When not working on art, what captures your attention and takes up your time?
OZ: Walking around places full of nature

SH: Are you a coffee or tea drinker?
OZ: coffee, of course!

SH: Who are a few of your favorite artists right now?
OZ: Esao Andrews,Dan Quintana,Ito Jakuchu,James Jean,Jessica Joslin,Katsuya Terada, Kikyz1313, Kent Williams ,Gakkin, Fuyuko Matsui, Vania Zouravliov and more!

SH: Are you left or right handed?
OZ: Left handed but pencil is right

Ozabu Kitsune

The opening reception of Obazu’s 彷徨 (Wander) is Saturday, September 17th from 6pm to 9pm. Please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website for more information.

Upcoming Exhibition at Thinkspace Gallery – Ozabu’s ‘彷徨 (Wander)’

Ozabu Postcard

Ozabu
彷徨 (Wander)
September 17, 2016 – October 8, 2016

Thinkspace is pleased to present new works by Japanese artist Ozabu in Wander. Her drawings are staggeringly detailed, stylized and yet lifelike, rendered with incredibly subtle line work. Created with minimal media in pencil and graphite on paper, her ghostly hauntings of paper flesh range from the comely to the macabre.

Aesthetically inspired by the visual cultures and mythologies of Japan, Ozabu’s emotive figurative drawings often incorporate animal symbolism and references to the natural world. Preferring to allow the work to speak for itself, Ozabu often avoids comment on her imagery, hoping the viewer will shape personal readings themselves.

Sensual, dark, and at times ominous, the open-ended works reveal moments of a larger narrative and plot beyond the frame. Characters appear with symbolic aegis under the cover of wings, bird’s heads, insects, and lush flora, like woeful apparitions or powerful augurs. Ozabu’s world is a mysteriously beautiful shadow land.

Ozabu New Wors

Ozabu New Works

 

 

 

 

Interview with Troy Lovegates for ‘Tales From The Riverbank’

Lovegates Banner II

Troy Lovegates wanders the world with eyes wide open absorbing his surrounding and soaking in inspiration, his brain firing with ideas faster than he can record them. We’re excited to be showing Lovegates latest body of work ‘Tales from the Riverbank’, opening Saturday, June 25th. Our interview with Lovegates covers the days before the internet, his creative process, and what the life of this artist looks like.

SH: What is the inspiration or narrative behind the latest body of work?
TL: It is hard to say, every little piece in the show is something different i think … trying to express one separate thing. I don’t really have a blanket inspiration or narrative. Consider the body a variation of all the trials and tribulations of the last 6 months.

Troy Lovegates Tales from the Riverbank

SHWhat does being an artist mean to you?
TL: Here in San Francisco it is very strange to be an artist. I work on an odd schedule comparatively to the 9-5ers, most of my days are searching for frames and wood and wandering. Looking for references and ideas out on the streets to incorporate into my work. To me wandering is a huge part of being an artist, just getting on the train to a different part of the bay area and wandering up mountains and thinking alot. I find that all the parks and hills and lakes and streets are dead in the day everyone is on a hard grind here to afford SF, so i experience a weird quiet shell of a city . Then i usually work all night, I don’t know i guess being an artist to me is thinking way-way too much.

SH: What is your favorite and least favorite aspects of being an artist?
TL:  (favorite) Painting murals on the street is amazing because you meet people and they want to know what you are up to and engage with you and give you feed back …. painting in the studio can be a really lonely experience

Travelling for exhibitions and murals … new places … really the most inspiring thing is a fresh view and new faces and energy

I can and have moved anywhere as my work can be created wherever.  It is not dependent on one-time zone or one office or city; therefore I have lived in Toronto, Montreal,Vancouver, Victoria, Berlin, Taipei, Buenos Aires and now San Francisco

(least favorite) Getting the funding to make the work you really want to be making. I find it hard to truly 100% concentrate on what I want to be doing as an artist because shit like rent, food and the money you need to make get in the way.

I spend so much time applying for grants and sketching proposals trying to get big projects on the go and 95% of the time it never comes to be. Actually, some of the drawings in this show are rejected murals.

Troy Lovegates Tales from the Riverbank

SH: You have a lot of fun with patterns and color in your work? Do you map out how it will be first or just let it flow?
TL: In the last years a lot of my color drawings are like those ink splotch cards that you see in movies, look at this one what do you see? An axe murderer! And this one? A butterfly. I just splootch down some paint and fill in what I see in the various shapes; a lot of them come out just terrible so I leave them on the streets or on the train or wherever. Most of the time when I am doing patterns I just wing it, no outline no color palette, I like things looking off … while i admire the work of people such as say the Low Bros and their ability for perfection i am just way to messy and impatient to focus the way they do …

SH: What is your creative process?
TL: Oh man it is the dance of procrastination. I am the unfocused artist fighting to get something finished. I will have like 5 paintings or drawings on the go at once and be eating and texting and watching a movie and battling someone at scrabble, then take the dog for a walk, then back to painting and listening to a podcast and doing the laundry and scrolling Instagram. I really need a cabin in the woods to escape all the city out there dragging me away from my work

Troy Lovegates Tales from the Riverbank

SH: How do you work through creative blocks and self-doubt?
TL: I have the opposite of a creative block I have too many ideas. Really, I am always thinking down the line to the next thing I want to do and I get really excited. I need to calm down and put in the work on my current painting before I can move on.

Self-doubt is a motivator for me. Nothing is ever good enough, and that propels me to do better or just do more and more until I get it right. But I never get it right and that is what keeps me on and on.

SH: What drew you to painting on trains? Do you have a good story to share from the yards?
TL: Way back in the early 1990s before smart phones and high speed internet, graffiti artists used to trade photos with each other through the mail. Someone gave me one address and when I wrote them they sent me more addresses in the package. Also in these letters would be photos of local graffiti, stickers and sketches of lettering etc. The names and dates of the artist would be written on the backs of the photos. I wasn’t really into painting trains at that time but had done a couple with some friends on nights we couldn’t find good walls. Anyways, this one friend of mine got a package from some writer in San Diego and it had a photo of one of my trains that I had painted in Toronto that he had photographed in Mexico. That was three time zones away and a 24 hour drive south in a country that at that point I had never set foot in. After that I almost only painted trains, the North American train system was like a giant bulky internet sending random messages out to who the hell knows where.

 

Troy Lovegates Tales from the Riverbank

SH: Today it’s more common for street artists to be exhibited in galleries, but when you started there was still a push back. What was that transition like for you? How did you figure out how to translate what you were doing outside to indoors?
TL: I started scribbling on walls way back in 1988-89 it must be so different for a person starting today. People intentionally do street art now as a way to break into the gallery world or mural world. I never imagined I would have turned into an artist from skateboarding around and drawing on walls and trains. These days I try less and less to associate the two things together at all; art outside and art inside are two completely different beings. One is clandestine and quick and fleeting a lot of it is not documented and probably nobody even sees it or if they do, really cares. The other is super detailed and thought out and planned in a safe peaceful environment listening to music and relaxing for an intentional audience.

SH: What would be a perfect day in SF be like for you?
TL: Get up early take the train out to some random mountain, hike with the dog for a few hours perhaps find a train line or a random spot to draw on a bit. Come back down into the city and check some thrift stores on the way back to the train. Then meet up with the wife on the train back home and have dinner and work late into the night, possibly another night time adventure with the puppy. Maybe a beer up in the hills as the fog rolls in or a long bike ride somewhere? swimming? beach walk… San Francisco to me is all about the nature surrounding the city. There are so many different perfect days to have out there!

SH: Congratulations, you get to throw the most epic dinner party for 5 people dead or alive! (Loved ones get an automatic in) Who is on the guest list? What’s on the menu? And what would be your ice breaker question?
TL: Gosh, I think i would like to have dinner with New Order and Richard D James. Actually, I think I would like to get pissed with them. I think we would all forgo dinner as to let the alcohol go right to our heads. Just a night out on the town or something. I think my icebreaker would be wanting to know what music they are listening to these days and what are their favorite bands and groups of all time. Maybe they have some hidden gems that I know nothing about … ( i really need some new music)

Troy Lovegates

Join us this Saturday, June 25th from 6-9pm for the opening of ‘Tales from the Riverbank’ in the Thinkspace Gallery project room. For more information on Troy Lovegates, please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Interview with James Bullough for “Breaking Point”

James Bullough Interview

Thinkspace Gallery is proud to present James Bullough’s solo exhibition Breaking Point, in the gallery’s project room. In anticipation for the show, we have an exclusive interview with James Bullough sharing with us his process of moving through creative blocks, moving to Berlin, and a dream dinner party.

SH: Artists explore many different styles before finding their voice, what inspired you to explore altered reality and what about it clicked as this was your voice?
JB: When I first started painting back in my early 20s and for probably the first 5 years or so I was painting entirely abstract works with no real direction or voice. These early paintings in retrospect were basically just studies and experimentations in composition and graphic layout. I soon realized that none of them ever felt like finished paintings and they were all missing a vital element. With some guidance from a local painter in Baltimore Matt Zoll, I basically taught myself how to use oils so I could add some elements of realism into my abstract paintings. Almost immediately I realized that the realism was the star of the show and became the main focus of the work but the abstraction never left. as my oil skills increased, I began concentrating on portraiture and that’s when it all started clicking for me. The mixture of realism and abstraction has been my thing ever since.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: What does a day in the studio look like, from morning to night?
JB: My work day is very different depending what stage of the process I’m in. Some days are spent with models and photographers doing photo shoots, others spent on the computer day after day manipulating photos and sketching out potential paintings. In the summers, I spend a lot of time outside painting walls, but in the studio with a brush in hand is where I like to focus most of my attention.

A typical studio day starts with a strong coffee and an hour or so at home on the computer getting any administrative stuff out of the way. I don’t have the internet at my studio which really helps with focus and attention; so once I get to the studio around noon it’s all business from then on. I’m a very slow painter and some days I might only paint a few square inches in an entire 8 hour work day… the hair, a face, a leg, exc.. It can be frustrating but it’s the only way I know how. I normally paint my backgrounds first and then sketch out my figures on top of that. Once the sketch is set in place, I do a quick and somewhat loose underpainting that normally takes a couple days. From there I meticulously paint the final image on top of the underpainting. For the most part, once I’ve put the second layer on any given spot, that section is finished and I move on to the next section. At 8 o’clock I go home and cook with my wife, have a late dinner and then up early the next morning to do it all over again.

SH: You really explore the human form in your work with your models showing extensions or collapse of form, do you take reference photos yourself or find the form elsewhere? Are your models’ dancers?
JB: With this current body of work I had a very clear idea for about a year that I wanted to create an entire series of figures floating in the air. I’ve worked with a few dancers in Berlin before on different projects and through them I met a few more and everyone was super keen to come work on the project with me so I assembled a team. I found a photographer in Hamburg named Florian Gobetz (www.graphic-to-go.de) who had done a series of photos with dancers jumping in the air and asked him to come to Berlin to work with me on the project. I am horrible with a camera but good with directing, so together with Flo’s photography skills and the incredible dancers who gave everything they had to get me the images I wanted we were able to get some amazing photos.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: How do you battle self-doubt or creative blocks?
JB: This is a great question and one of the most difficult parts of being an artist, especially one that works alone. It is not uncommon for me to go weeks in the studio without anyone seeing anything I’ve done. This can be jarring and the self-doubt can really start to fester. I normally get to a point with almost every painting where all I can see are the problems and mistakes, a point where another artist might move on to a different piece and come back later with fresh eyes after some time has passed. I on the other hand approach painting more like sport and each new piece as a battle, once I’ve started, there’s no turning back. Through years of painting this way I’ve learned that if I just plow through, eventually I’ll figure it out.

SH: What made you decide to move to Berlin? How do you think that has shaped you as an artist?
JB: In 2001 I was living in Australia and met a girl from Berlin (now my wife). In the five years that followed my visit to Berlin often to see her and it didn’t take long for me to fall in love with the city. It’s always been hard for me to put my finger on exactly what it was that I fell in love with but there is a sense of freedom and creativity in Berlin that I had never experienced anywhere else. At that time in my life, I needed a change and I knew that Berlin, because of it’s cheap living and creative vibe could provide me with what I needed to make the leap from being a gainfully employed middle school teacher to a basically unemployed full-time painter… and I was right.

In Berlin, I was able to live cheaply and get a studio and just experiment without the pressure of making money and getting a “real job” At the time I still hadn’t found my voice as a painter and I needed a couple of years of trying different things in order to find it. I spent a lot of time in the studio figuring things out and I began painting in the many abandoned spaces in and around Berlin and experimenting with painting on walls for the first time. Those first two or three years in Berlin were extremely important for me and In the end, I think the greatest gift Berlin ever gave to me was time.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: What’s been a WOW moment for you thus far in your career?
JB: In 2015 I was invited to paint a wall inside the Long Beach Museum of Art in California as part of the Vitality and Verve show put on by the LBMA, Thinkspace Gallery, and POW! WOW! Long Beach. The other participating artists were some of my biggest influences in the art world and people I had been admiring for years and years… legends like Craola, Audry Kawasaki, Tristan Eaton, Nychos, Jeff Soto and basically everyone involved. I felt like it was a mistake that I was even invited, that I didn’t belong in such a group, but I also saw it as an opportunity to show people what I could really do. I made it my mission to paint my best mural to that point and really go for broke. As I worked there throughout the week and built friendships with these people who meant so much to me, I also banged out a great painting that I was really proud of. There is no greater accomplishment in my opinion than gaining the respect of the people you so greatly admire, and that week I felt like I had done exactly that.

SH: What motivated you to do a podcast? What’s been your most favorite and least favorites part of that process?
JB: VantagePoint Radio was an idea I had after living in Berlin for a few years and meeting so many different and interesting artists. I found myself time and time again sitting in a bar or at a party with someone and because of my curious and chatty nature we often fell into deep conversations about their practices and how and why they do what they do. I found it really inspirational and informative. It just seemed logical that other people would be interested to hear these conversations so I set out to start a radio show. A friend of mine named Tom Phillipson (www.Auto64.com) had worked in radio before in Australia so I asked him to be my co-host and produce the show and it was that simple. Because Berlin is such a magnet for street artists and muralists, we were able to get some of the biggest names in the game and once the ball started rolling it never really stopped. I’m supra proud of what we’ve accomplished with VantagePoint. At this point, we’ve done over 60 interviews and thoroughly documented the scene in a way nobody else has done.

Visit www.VantagePointRadio.com to check out all of the past shows and videos.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: Where was your first mural? What was the prep and execution like?
JB: Oh man… my first mural was in Washington DC on the side of a bar back in 2004 or so. I painted it together with an artist named Andrea Wlodarczyk and we really didn’t know what we were doing. It was a super fun process but took us almost the entire summer, mostly because we painted during open hours and the drinks and food were free so we really didn’t try to rush things. Today I think I’d probably do that wall in an afternoon. It was kind of a cheesy beach scene with a crashing wave and all that but it wasn’t too bad. This was years before I would ever pick up a spray can so we did the whole thing with brushes and latex paint and it was kind of a nightmare. I recently passed by that wall for the first time in years and it’s still there and in pretty good condition. It wasn’t my best work, but I’m still proud of that wall

SH: If you through a dinner party for 5 people dead or alive, who would be on the guest list? What would be served? And what music is playing in the background?
JB: WOW! this is basically an impossible question but here goes…
Guest List: Moss Def, Adam Carolla, Conor Harrington, Erika Badu, and the 25-year-old version of my baby girl who will be born in September
Food: Maryland Blue crabs with tons of Old Bay seasoning and unlimited Natty Boh beer in a can on ice.
Music: The entire album ‘Circles’ by Adam F and a selection of Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Bob James.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: What do you think is the biggest misconception about being an artist and about your work in general?
JB: The work ethic! I think people have an impression of artists as relaxed maybe even somewhat lazy creatives. The fact is almost every successful artists I know is an extreme workaholic and a master of the hustle. Learning to paint and create an image from absolutely nothing is a skill and takes a lot of hard work, time, and focus, but the business side of the job is just as demanding. I don’t have an assistant or a manager or anything so every aspect of my business is done by me. Deciding what projects to take and which to turn down, who to work with or not, and knowing how many different projects you can handle at any given time is extremely important and can have massive consequences on your career now and in the future. I don’t think artists get enough credit for what they truly are, extremely driven, self-employed entrepreneurs who both produce and manage the product that their company and family live off of.

James Bullough Postcard

Please join us Saturday, May 28th for the opening reception of Breaking Point from 6-9pm. For additional information on Thinkspace Gallery and our upcoming exhibitions please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.