Seth Armstrong’s “Pretty Deep Shit” opening April 29th

Seth Armstrong
Pretty Deep Shit
April 29 – May 20, 2017

Thinkspace is pleased to present Pretty Deep Shit, featuring new paintings by artist Seth Armstrong. In this new body of work, the Los Angeles-based painter, born and raised, explores LA as a dystopian landscape, inspired by its off-kilter charm and its reputation for being a cultural kaleidoscope of beauty and barrenness, depth and vacancy. Known for paintings that self-consciously capture the act of looking – whether as a voyeur in trespass, a spectator in an audience, or a participant in the landscape – Armstrong captures the simultaneity of the city as a place of endless, contingent narratives, jarring interruptions, and suspenseful pauses.

Pretty Deep Shit is a tongue in cheek nod to the weight of simple things. In a time where our global and national political climate is uncertain and precarious, and the general cultural atmosphere divisive and fraught, Armstrong observes the localized, the personal, and the momentary. He looks to the poignancy of small observations, quiet corners, and unassuming moments – the intimacy of a world that continues to unfold in private spaces in spite of larger or more daunting world events. His past works have often captured a stylized take on Americana brought to life with a cinematic edge, in this new body of work similar impulses remain though they feel scaled back, more meditative and tempered, closer to observation and memory than to the staging of cinema.

The exhibition is about Armstrong’s lived observations of LA, presenting a more cohesive and intimate arrest of the city that tends to polarize or exert a gravitational pull. There’s a code of exemption in LA, a kind of freedom and fluidity from the mores of other cities that Armstrong captures through its stylization. Everything from Craftsman bungalows, parched Echo Park landscapes in the midst of drought and shiny seas of stalled cars, to motley downtown architectures, high rise windows lit by night, and voyeuristic glimpses of women in domestic spaces, reflect the ongoing, and inexhaustible, stories of the urban sprawl. Always in search of the oddly beautiful in unlikely places, Armstrong captures the grittiness and allure of a city that inspires the deepest of love/hate relationships.

Armstrong’s works offer cleverly crafted moments of suspended or anticipated action. Often the absence of human subjects alludes to their unseen presence in absentia – the traces of their proximity and activities linger in subtle seeking, much in the way the city itself is always alive with invisible stories. Though we may not have access to the narrative, its threads are implied as we move through the depicted spaces, objects, and structures. This open-ended interrelatedness is revisited throughout Armstrong’s works. A shared current connects each piece, intended in this case to be read sequentially as moments in a larger narrative arc, though each stands alone. Some offer vast views, and others contracted intimacy, moving freely in and out of public and private spaces, but they convene when seen together as a whole, and marry voyeur and subject in a single ambiguous vantage point.

Technically, the paintings are highly detailed and tend to move between looser and more painterly executions to tighter hyperrealistic ones. Each oil painting is executed slightly differently by the artist, rather than formulaically, resulting in varied physical textures and surface qualities in each. Armstrong is finessing the paintings in this current body of work, glazing details and working into the minutiae now more than ever; they feel even richer and more vibrant as a result. Though Armstrong has a preference for bright and highly saturated palettes, the tone of the work is anything but. A discomfort and strangeness loom throughout in even the brightest and most colorful scenes. His use of stark contrasts and exaggerated light contribute to a feeling of hypersensitization – a world of strange edges, soft swells, and unfamiliar intensities. Something slightly off-kilter haunts, pushing even the most seemingly familiar scenes into the realm of the subtly surreal.

Studio Visit with Seth Armstrong for “Pretty Deep Shit”

Seth Armstrong’s paintings self-consciously capture a sense of looking, arresting moments with cinematic detail and voyeuristic curiosity. Varying in scale, the paintings offer views that are alternately intimate and vast, moving expertly between the monumental and the minute. Laden with detail and suggestion, each piece offers a moment in the trajectory of a larger narrative, and the viewer is compelled to realign the fractures of these inconclusive moments. Hanging the works on suggestion rather than on the overt, Armstrong builds tension and excitement in every painting with the possibility and expectation of action.

Very excited to share this new body of work with you all soon. Stay tuned for more sneak peeks and details as we grow closer to the show.

Pretty Deep Shit opening at Thinkspace Gallery, April 29th.

Thinkspace Family on Instagram : 4

On Instagram, you will always find us posting sneak peeks, studio shots, and the work of our Thinkspace family from around the world. Follow the accounts of those artists and you’ll get a sneak peek into their lives and creative process. To continue our series, Thinkspace Family on Instagram, here are the accounts of a few artists who are currently hanging in our Littletopia LA Art Show booth. The Instagram accounts below are in the following order;  Stephanie Buer, Seth Armstrong, Tran Nguyen, Jim Houser, Carl Cashman. To view more of each artist’s Instagram account click their username next to the profile picture.

Wiggly weeds 🌾

A photo posted by Stephanie Buer (@stephanie_buer) on

WIP for an upcoming #StarWars tribute show at Gallery Nucleus. #trannguyen #mynameistran

A photo posted by Tran Nguyen (@mynameistran) on

making a painting for his new room . that’s our house . the pointiest house in town . A photo posted by jim houser (@misterhouser) on

Tidy workspace, tidy mind.. Or something like that #carlcashman #mooseyart #thesunshinesoutofmyarts

A photo posted by Carl cashman (@carlcashman) on

Interview with Seth Armstrong for The Air Is Thick

Seth Armstrong Studio Visit

photo courtesy of Robin Redd from Art Nerd studio visit.

Interview with Seth Armstrong for “The Air is Thick” on view a at Thinkspace Gallery  March 28 – April 18, 2015. Seth Armstrong will be present at the opening night March 28, 6-9pm.

Warm-up Questions:
SH: coffee or tea?
SA: Coffee
SH: background noise: music or tv show?
SA: Music
SH: snacks: savory or sweet?
SA: both
SH: dogs or cats?
SA: Dogs

SH: When do you get the most painting done? Morning, Noon, Night, Middle of the Night/Morning?
SA: I’d say late afternoon/evening/night-time.

SH: What inspired the direction of your work for the upcoming show?
SA: I started out with a common narrative in mind for the show, but I quickly got interested in other stuff, and now rather than a common thread that ties all the paintings together, the paintings seem to be more sequential. One relates to the next, but each may not belong with all the others. The city of LA had a big influence on the paintings, as in the architecture and the light. Also growing up in a town saturated by the movie industry, a lot of the paintings have a filmic quality to them.

Seth Armstrong

SH: Have you ever accidentally drank or was about to drink the dirty ‘paint’ water?
SA: I have accidentally put turpentine to my lips, but I’ve never swallowed it.

SH: What other artists work are you a fan of right now?
SA: I’ve always been a huge fan of my friend Chris Russell’s paintings. They are epic and colorful and amazing. I’ve got more of his paintings at my house than any other artist’s. (chrisrussellart.com)

SH: What brand of paint so you use? What’s your favorite color and brush right now?
SA: I like Gamblin oil paint right now. Favorite color is between yellow ochre or cobalt teal. Favorite brush is currently Princeton Art and Brush Co’s. They’ve got a nice flow and firmness, but they are shitty enough where I don’t have to worry too much about destroying them. Which I do.

Seth(march)

SH: How long does it take to complete a single piece? Do you work on multiple pieces at one time?
SA: Depends on the painting. There are paintings in this show that took more than a month, and there are paintings that took less than an hour.
I generally work on one painting at a time, but lately I’ve taken paintings to the point where they are very nearly done, then spend weeks on the finishing touches as I work on others.

SH: What motivated you to choose the life/career of an artist?
SA: My parents have always been very supportive. They both moved to LA to become actors, so they understand the whole “do what you love” mentality. I’ve always been drawing and painting, so as I was finishing high school, there wasn’t any kind of deciding moment, it just seemed like the natural next step.

SH: What do you know now, that you wish you would have known when first embarking on your artistic career?
SA: I still don’t know shit, so don’t worry about it.

thewrestlers

SH: What creative person; artist, musician, director, family member etc… has had the most influence or inspired your own artistic voice?
SA: One of the most significant people to influence me at a younger age was probably my high school art teacher, Mealiffe. She was the best. Incredibly supportive. A lot of kids from her class went on to careers in the arts.

SH: If your could invite 5 people dead or alive to a dinner party, who would be on your guest list and what’s on the menu?
SA: Ben Franklin, Elvis Presley, Leonardo Da Vinci, Brigitte Bardot, and Teddy Roosevelt. Spaghetti with meat sauce.

thefalconer

New work by Seth Armstrong in “The Air is Thick”

Seth Armstrong The Air is Thick Postcard

New work by Seth Armstrong in “The Air is Thick” on view March 28, 2015 to April 18, 2015.
Opening Reception with artists on hand:
Saturday, March 28th 6-9PM

 

Thinkspace is pleased to present The Air is Thick featuring new works by Los Angeles based artist Seth Armstrong. Armstrong’s paintings self-consciously capture a sense of looking, arresting moments with cinematic detail and voyeuristic curiosity. Varying in scale, the paintings offer views that are alternately intimate and vast, moving expertly between the monumental and the minute. Laden with detail and suggestion, each piece offers a moment in the trajectory of a larger narrative, and the viewer is compelled to realign the fractures of these inconclusive moments. Hanging the works on suggestion rather than on the overt, Armstrong builds tension and excitement in every painting with the possibility and expectation of action. Surfeited with this palpable sense of permanent anticipation and arrest, the air is indeed thick enough to cut.

Originally from Los Angeles, Armstrong studied painting in Northern Holland and completed a BFA at San Francisco’s California College of the Arts. His deft handling of oil paint clearly demonstrates a facility inspired by traditional painting techniques, and a material aptitude for the dense capture of light and color. The intense realism of his style is often tempered by a looser, more painterly approach, and by a stylized handling of light and dimension. With viscous luminosity and substantive flesh, qualities achieved with a seamlessly clean application, his works feel heavy with tactility and dense with tangible space and body. Armstrong’s use of stark saturated contrasts is offset by a tendency towards stylized hyper-color, creating both depth and edge that exceeds the muted tones of the real. These contrasts achieve a sense of brooding visual tension that manages to evoke both nostalgia and strangeness simultaneously.

In The Air is Thick, Armstrong continues to explore themes that have consistently fascinated his output: the intrigue of illicit looking, and the fine line between intimacy and trespass. Just as cinema manages to satisfy our innate love of voyeuristic access, so too do the paintings offer us views onto private lives that both frustrate and satisfy. The suggestion of constant narrative pervades even the stillest and least active views, as Armstrong reminds us of the secret recesses behind all closed doors and all quiet faces.

Seth Armstrong The Air Is Thick

Seth Armstrong – “The Air is Thick”

 

Hi-Fructose interview Seth Armstrong / new solo in SF at Gallery Heist opens this Sat, May 14th

Hi-Fructose just interviewed Seth Armstrong as he prepares to open up his new solo show this evening at Gallery Heist in San Francisco. Better yet, the interview was conducted by fellow Thinkspace family member Brett Amory (who just showed alongside Seth at Thinkspace this past January).

Seth Armstrong ‘Another Thing Coming’

May 14th – June 11th, 2011 at Gallery Heist in San Francisco
www.setharmstrong.com

Check out Hi-Fructose’s full interview with Seth here:
www.hifructose.com/the-blog/1488-an-interview-with-seth-armstrong.html

Opening night for ‘There It Is’ and ‘Happy Valley’ at Thinkspace

Featured artists Adam Caldwell, Brett Amory, and Seth Armstrong

Thank you to everyone that came out this past weekend to the opening night reception for ‘There It Is’ in our main gallery and ‘Happy Valley’ in our project room. With all the galleries in Culver City having their 1st openings of the new season, the streets and galleries in the art district were just packed the whole evening through with art lovers enjoying all the new exhibits on view.

Opening night crowd for 'There It Is' and 'Happy Valley'

Check out our full set of pictures from the opening evening here:
www.flickr.com/photos/thinkspace/sets/72157625808489442/

Capturing the work of Paul Barnes

Some excellent works from both exhibits are still available, so please be sure to look over the digital catalogs for both shows below.

‘There It Is’ digital catalog: www.thinkspacegallery.com/2011/01/works.php

‘Happy Valley’ digital catalog: www.thinkspacegallery.com/2011/01/project/works.php

Both exhibits on view through Jan. 29thplease stop through if in the neighborhood.

Thinkspace / 6009 Washington Blvd in Culver City / www.thinkspacegallery.com