Opening Night of Gumbo, Beautanica, and Contenders

Thinkspace hosted a gallery full of art lovers for the opening night of Gumbo, Beautanica, and Contenders. Gumbo is a group exhibition featuring works by Alex Yanes, James Bullough, Matthew Grabelsky, Ryan Hewett, Sergio Garcia, Troy Coulterman and Troy Lovegates. A diverse group of artists that reflect the diversity of our steadily expanding gallery roster. It’s a fantastic exhibition showing various styles, from sculpture to figurative abstract portraiture. Australian artist Bec Winnel exhibited her new work in our project room, featuring ethereal beauties who mesmerized guests. Forcing collectors to stare on, torn between which pieces to purchase. And sold out before doors opened, Brian Mashburn’s new work for ‘Contender’ is a captivating teaser for his upcoming show in July.
You can view all the photos from the opening night on Flickr or Facebook. The exhibitions are on view from April 25 through May 16 during gallery hours.


Above photos and all opening night photography is by photographer Sam Graham.

An Interview with Troy Coulterman for GUMBO

Troy Coulterman Gumbo

A short but sweet interview with Troy Coulterman for his upcoming show ‘GUMBO’ at Thinkspace Gallery. ‘GUMBO’ will be featuring new pieces from seven Thinkspace artists who all bring a different style, voice, and flavor to their art. GUMBO opens Saturday April 25th from 6-9pm, and will be on view till May 16th. 

SH: What artist in the upcoming ‘Gumbo’ show would you want to collaborate with and why?
TC: This is difficult because all these artists are spectacular. But I would say Sergio Garcia, not only because he does a lot of sculpture, but because there is humor in his work and he is able to deliver a purposeful message to the viewer. I also appreciate his craftsmanship.

SH: When do you get the most work done; morning, noon, or night?
TC: Morning and night. Mornings I have more energy to get things done and I find the best time to be creative is at night.

SH: In three words, describe your artwork.
TC: absurd everyday anomalies

SH: How long does it take you to finish a piece? What is your processes?
TC: It varies on the size, but most sculptures take anywhere between one to three weeks to create. There are a lot of steps in creating one sculpture. Typically I will start with a concept drawing; and then move into these following steps; armature; clay modeling; mold making; cast; patch; sand; mounting; prime; and paint. It is an involved process, but in the end I have a mold so I can cast editions of a sculpture.

Troy Coulterman Regal Emanation Gumbo

SH: Do you remember the first time you showed your work to the public? Where was it?
TC: I was living in Toronto at the time and I couldn’t find anyone to show my work and some galleries would even charge the artist a fee just to exhibit in their space. So, I rented out a gallery in a community center and invited all my friends. On weekends this center had a great farmers market and that got a lot of people coming through the gallery. I actually sold some pieces and got a lot of good feedback from the public. I learnt a lot from that first show.

SH: Do you have any wise words for a fledgling artist who admires your work?
TC: Show as much as you can, even when there is no one out there that wants to show your work yet. Get together with some friends or just rent out a space for a week. The more you show the more feedback you get and the more you learn about your own practice.

SH Bonus Question: Speaking of gumbo, have you ever been to New Orleans? If so, tell us a tale! If not, tell us another tale.
TC: My wife and I visited a good friend in New Orleans for Mardi Gras in 2010. He took us out one morning to a Cajun community in South Louisiana to participate in Courir de Mardi Gras. We got dressed up in crazy costumes, started drinking at 8am and everyone went house to house in the community asking for ingredients to make gumbo. Most of the time neighbors would just throw a live chicken into the crowd and everyone would roll around in the mud trying to catch it. The night ended with homemade gumbo and dancing to Cajun music.

gumbo postcard

Group Exhibition GUMBO Opens Saturday April 25, 2015

gumbo postcard

 

Gumbo – Alex Yanes, James Bullough, Matthew Grabelsky, Ryan Hewett, Sergio Garcia, Troy Coulterman, Troy Lovegates

Opening Reception: Saturday April 25th 6-9pm
On view April 25, 2015 – May 16, 2015

Thinkspace is pleased to present Gumbo, a group exhibition featuring works by Alex Yanes, James Bullough, Matthew Grabelsky, Ryan Hewett, Sergio Garcia, Troy Coulterman and Troy Lovegates. A truly divergent group of Thinkspace artists, the show reflects the steadily expanding diversity of the gallery’s roster. Firmly forward-looking, while ambitiously setting the pace for the New Contemporary movement, these artists have phenomenal contributions to make and are consistently raising the standard. Gumbo is an exciting grouping of the gallery’s contrasting visions, personalities and media.

Alex Yanes creates whimsical multi-dimensional works, inspired by everything from subculture to his recent initiation into fatherhood. Based out of Miami, a vibrant urban culture that sings through his aesthetic, Yanes creates installation based pieces out of wood, acrylic, resin and enamel. With hyper-saturated colors and contrasts, immaculately finished surfaces and electric energy, Yanes’ spatial installations and objects command a physical and experiential presence. They combine a graphic sensibility, drawn from his formative years immersed in tattoo, rock, hip-hop and skateboard cultures, and an imaginative expansiveness that transforms the familiar into something entirely new. Elevated by an undeniable vibrance and individuality, his stylized works feel like living things.

James Bullough is an American born artist living and working in Berlin, Germany. His paintings, and huge monumentally scaled site-specific murals, are phenomenal combinations of realist painting technique and graphic punctuation. Inspired by gritty urban graffiti as a young artist growing up in Washington, DC, Bullough harnessed its energy in his work, and perfected a realistic oil painting technique from his study of the Old Masters. Combining the momentum of the one and the technical precision of the other, his work is about staging compelling contrasts and juxtapositions. Working in everything from oil, spray paint and ink on canvas, Bullough’s paintings strike a balance between realistic figurations and stylized interruption. Disjointing the realistic elements with graphic areas and fractured or striated planes, Bullough intends to challenge the viewer’s perception.

Matthew Grabelsky’s implausible, and wonderfully fantastic, paintings depict surreal manifestations of the subconscious in unlikely urban contexts. Influenced by 19th century French Academic painting, his technical sophistication and refinement contribute to the delightful contrast of these unlikely scenes and humorous mixed-reality paintings. In his recent body of work the New York City subways are invaded by quasi-mythical creatures, part human and part beast, or surreal appearances by other wonderful grotesques. In these otherwise unassuming daily scenes of public transit, Grabelsky inserts a cast of characters borrowed from fairytale and the zoo, delighting in the absurd and the impossible. Intending his work to inspire sub-conscious free association in his viewers, Grabelsky plays with context and expectation.

Ryan Hewett approaches portraiture with an expressive and painterly aesthetic. Pursuing the capture of energy rather than the practice of verisimilitude, the South African artist has a distinctive painting style that seizes the energy and observed experience of his sitters. With loosely layered surfaces that emanate depth, light and dimension, Hewett creates emotive and passionate representations that embrace the materiality and texture of his medium. Working with oil paints, his figurative impressions align themselves with the tumultuous tradition of expressionism. With rich hues and suggestive glimpses, his works are intense painterly interpretations of the body.

Sergio Garcia is inspired by the unconventional and the creative subconscious. The Texas based painter and sculptor, constructs works that are surreal combinations that place familiar situations and objects in extraordinary circumstances. A Hyperrealist in the truest sense, his sculptural works are uncannily true to life and play with the viewer’s spatial and contextual expectations. Wonderfully bizarre, they transform the mundane into fantastic phenomena, and encourage mind-boggling encounters in unexpected spaces. Similarly, his paintings offer whimsically unexpected combinations and creatively evocative scenes, inspiring free association and speculative wonder.

Troy Coulterman, Canadian artist, creates resin sculptures that seem like graphic novel or comic book characters come to life. Rich with suggestion, Coulterman artfully conveys ideas, metaphors and themes with graphic concision, capturing extensive narrative moments in a single sculptural body or gesture. Inspired by graphics and comic books, his cast of wonderfully bizarre characters emote and convey with exciting presence. As three-dimensional objects that read partly as animation come to life, and partly as dimensional drawing, they command our attention with an unrelenting pull. Distinctly human in their emotive power, but clearly other in their wonderful absurdity, his figures are captivating.

Troy Lovegates, widely known as “Other”, creates ambitious large-scale mural works with precision and detail. A street artist from Canada, his works are heavily patterned, saturated with hyper color, and incomparably dense and rich. With an impressive attention to detail and line, Lovegates builds figures and motifs through heavily condensed mark making. The figures in his work are wonderfully exaggerated and poetic, sympathetically drawn from equal parts caricature and realistic observation. His smaller format works are executed in several materials, ranging from weathered wood, books, paper and linoleum cuts. Self-described as an artist who enjoys the chaos of simultaneity and messy working conditions, Lovegates is constantly revising and adapting previous efforts, reintegrating them into current bodies of work that reflect the history of their making.