Drew Leshko Press Round Up

Drew Leshko New Work

Drew Leshko, currently showing new work in the Thinkspace Gallery office, has been receiving lots of great press across the internet. Here is a quick round up of links to more stories on Drew Leshko. Make sure to take a look at our interview with Drew where he goes into great detail over his process to create his miniature dumpster sculptures.

Beautiful Decay / ‘Drew Leshko’s Miniature Buildings Are A Study Of Neighborhood Gentrification

Dangerous Minds / ‘Miniature Recreations of Philadelphia’s Vanishing Urban Artifacts

Design Blendz / ‘Miniature Philadelphia

Hi-Fructose / ‘Drew Leshko Preserves Daily Urban Life in Paper Sculptures

Opening Reception of Nosego ‘Along Infinite River’ and Brian Mashburn ‘Witness’ exhibitions

along infinite river

Saturday, July 18th, Thinkspace Gallery hosted an opening reception for Nosego’s “Along Infinite River” and Brian Mashburn’s “Witness”, along with new works by Drew Leshko in the office. We released three prints that night, one from Brian Mashburn and two from Nosego that will be available on thinkspaceprints.com in the next few days. Please follow Thinkspace Gallery’s social media sites for updates. The new exhibitions will be on view till August 8th.

nosego mural

nosego main room

nosego hand

Nosego infront of piece

brian mashburn infront of work

brain mashburn flamingo

brian mashburn print

photo of a painting

black book nosego

observing work

thinkspace room

david and drew

thinkspace family

Coming in August – New Works by Fernando Chamarelli ‘Secret Code’

Fernando Chamarelli

Fernando Chamarelli – Secret Code
August 15th – September 5th, 2015

Thinkspace (Los Angeles) – is pleased to present new works by Brazilian designer, illustrator and artist Fernando Chamarelli in Secret Code, the artist’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. Chamarelli combines diverse graphic and cultural references to produce stunningly dense acrylic paintings. His distinctive use of line work and color reflect an eclectic graphic sensibility informed by everything from design, tattoos, street art and ancient history. Schooled in graphic design, Chamarelli creates complex mosaic like surfaces, filled with hybrid imagery and symbolism he has drawn from the varied aggregate of aesthetics, visual cultures and philosophies that inspire him. Recurring references in his works include Brazilian culture and music, astrology, occultism, and ancient pre-Columbian cultures. He creates an immersive and storied visual world that with each revisitation offers a new discovery. By merging contemporary influences with ancient and historical elements, Chamarelli creates a visual language that suspends past and present.

Inspired by his Brazilian heritage, Chamarelli channels the disparateness of his cultural environment through his work, tapping into his country’s rich history of contrasts and coexisting diversities. He incorporates elements of Brazilian folklore, carnival, indigenous costume and myth, while borrowing imagery from Aztec, Incan and Mayan histories, among others. Fascinated by sacred geometries and the symbology of ancient cultures, Chamarelli builds beautifully anomalous and surreal iconographies with hidden meanings and intersecting significations. By drawing from different philosophies, and seemingly divergent aesthetics, he creates something entirely transformed from the appropriated parts of existing traditions.

Chamarelli’s works are filled with mystical creatures, organic flora, totemic animals and geometric motifs, knit together in dense interconnected compositions that are brought to life with vibrantly psychedelic color palettes. These compositions are thick with visual information, line, shapes, geometries and figures. Their individual parts, however, are completely absorbed and integrated into the whole of an indivisible design. Incredibly stylized and optically intricate, the work at first reads as seamless overall pattern until, upon closer inspection, the elements are disentangled and individuated by the viewer. Chamarelli successfully unites several stories and traditions into a single image, encouraging a multiplicity of tangential readings and discoveries.

As the exhibition title, Secret Code, suggests, Chamarelli’s works present hidden narratives and mysteriously adapted iconographies. Like intricately constructed tessellations, each minute element in each composition is an integral piece of a larger puzzle. The cryptic symbolism of these works feels somehow infinite and universal; simultaneously contemporary and ancient, historical and yet entirely new. Chamarelli offers us a dense and evasive world of appropriated histories, and inventive new ones, all held together by the harmony of beautifully continuous and uninterrupted lines.

Coming in August – New Works by Carl Cashman ‘An Edited Version of Life’

Carl Cashman Postcard

August 15th – September 5th, 2015

Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room are new works by UK-based artist Carl Cashman in An Edited Version of Life. Cashman creates vibrant neon colored op-art, a genre he has coined “neometry”, or neon geometry. The works are hypnotic, at times bordering on the hallucinatory, and blur the distinction between digital and analogue forms. Entirely executed by hand, the paintings are crisp, precise and graphically decisive, though clearly hand crafted rather than digitally produced. Cashman creates his imagery in the absence of any digital means, relying exclusively on a sketch pad, pencil, tape and acrylic paint. These electric hued pieces sit on the cusp somewhere between grid-inspired modernism and contemporary psychedelia. His process relies on the detailed draftsmanship he has perfected in recent years, an emphasis he decided to discipline following an abandoned foray into stencil-based work.

Based out of Devon in the UK, Cashman paints primarily on wood panel. He has recently expanded this practice to include works on found objects and repurposed surfaces, such as skateboards and cricket paddles. Using UV reactive paints at times to create an added dimensional effect, Cashman’s abstract geometric imagery often produces the illusion of emitting actual light and movement. Visually hypnotic and entrancing, they’re optically fascinating pieces that seem to hum with energy and depth, interrupting our expectations of real space in a wash of color and illusion.

Interview with Nosego for “Along Infinite River”

Nosego Murals LBMA

Nosego working on his mural for ‘Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape’ at Long Beach Museum of Art. 

SH: What inspired your new work for “Along Infinite River”?
NG: There’s a good bit of inspiration from all over the place but ultimately it was based around the idea that we’re all apart of something bigger. The fact that we all have living organisms and communities of bacteria that are apart of us is as if we have little worlds that make us complete. Simultaneously we live in a world amongst other worlds or the possibilities of other worlds. Either way this idea intrigued me and pushed the work forward.

SH: How did your signature creatures come into fruition? When did you feel you developed your artistic voice?
NG: I’m actually not sure what creatures of mine are signature ones, but the inspiration to create them can come from anywhere.

SH: Your work keeps evolving with each new show. It seems you really push yourself whenever you sit down to create. Was there an exceptionally challenging piece in “Along Infinite River”?
NG: I usually notice my flaws in prior work so I try address the things that I think needs improvement in the following work. Ultimately I just want the work to have a feeling. Yeah every piece has a personal challenge I don’t enjoy the work if it comes easy I feel that I learn from the challenges.

Nosego Painting Welcoming

SH: Are you on team provolone or cheese whiz for your Philly Cheese Steak?
NG: Provolone, but I’m not a huge fan of Cheese Steaks*.

SH: Which Ninja Turtle has the most presidential candidate potential?
NG: I would say Michelangelo for president and Donatello for vice.

SH: What do you do when self-doubt or inspiration dry spells hit you?
NG: Keep painting! Only way to get through it.

Welcoming Along Infinite River

SH: What is your process? How long does it take you to finish a single piece?
NG: It varies from piece to piece.

SH: What are your favorite artists at the moment?
NG: Too many to name

Home Nosego

SH: What advice would you give a fledgling artist who looks up to your work?
NG: Enjoy your work and share the work you enjoy.

SH: What is your spirit animal?
NG: I’m still searching.

*Nosego prefers sushi

Sharing Light Nosego

 

New works by Nosego will be on view at Thinkspace Gallery July 18th – August 8th. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6pm. Please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website for more information and to view all available works from ‘Along Infinite River’.