‘Scorch and Drop’ – Debut U.S. solo show from Alex Face | August 14 – September 4 at Thinkspace

Alex Face – ’Scorch and Drop’
August 14 – September 4, 2021
Opening Night August 14th | Saturday, 6PM- 9PM

Thinkspace Projects presents Alex Face’s debut U.S. solo show, ‘Scorch and Drop’, following successful solo exhibitions in Bangkok, Thailand and Venice, Italy. This brand new collection of work Face’s newest work incorporates the character Alex Face has become known for, exploring new situations and elements, introducing the variety within his work to a new audience. 

His signature subject, a quizzical smoking baby that shares a moniker with the artist himself, can be seen contemplating the future. With a worried look spread across its face, this baby turns an eye to the world around it, an extension of Alex Face’s identity as an artist with a social conscience.

The character was inspired by the birth of the artist’s daughter, “The first time I saw her she looked angry or worried, I thought, are you not happy to be my daughter? Are you not happy to be in the world?”

Ultimately, this moment became the catalyst for the character he is widely known for. The baby, with its third eye to represent another dimension beyond what we can plainly see, takes on new situations and future possibilities in this new collection of work.

‘Scorch and Drop’ opens August 14, 2021 with a reception from 6 PM to 9 PM. On view until September 4, 2021 at Thinkspace Projects.

About Alex Face
Patcharapol Tangruen, also known as Alex Face, is a well-known and influential graffiti artist in Thailand. Alex studied architecture at Bangkok’s King Mongkut Institute of Technology. He earned a Bachelor’s Degree from the Department of Fine & Applied Arts. An interest in architecture led Alex Face to explore and wander the streets and alleys of Bangkok for abandoned buildings, buildings that he eventually used as a canvas to develop his street art and express himself. He then created Alex Face, a character with an aged, disillusioned child’s face wearing animal costumes. Through his graffiti, Alex Face especially attempts to create a link with the urban population, the underprivileged of Bangkok and the provinces.

Artist Statement
แผดเผา ลุกโชน มอดดับ

Fire burning on the wings of hope
fragile petals on our heads,
glowing and blazing
we’re at the peak of our blissful life,
moving the thinnest part of our own body,
fluttering, aware of power and weakness
we scorch and drop,
as fire slowly burns our body and soul
we try our best
and most things appeared as they should
we’re on fire!!!
growing exponentially, moving freely
expressing our vision, angriness, kindness,
love and hate
we are shining and moving with power
until everything turns dark,
and another kind of creature
children of ours
will appear with their new light of day
yeah, we scorch and drop as we should

New Yosuke Ueno Prints Available Friday, July 30

Excited to share this new series of limited edition prints from Yosuke Ueno (b. 1977 Japan) that showcase three of his more popular works that were included in his solo exhibition ‘Majestic Parade’ at the Brand Library and Arts Center in Glendale, California that we curated for the artist.

Ueno was meticulous in assuring these were as close to the original works as possible and has signed and numbered each at his studio in Japan.

Printed on 300gsm paper, these special editions came out incredible and will look simply stunning once they are framed and on view in your home.

These special editions from Ueno will be available this Friday, July 30 at 9 am LA / 12 pm NYC / 5 pm London via our webshop. No pre-sales.

YOSUKE UENO
“Thanatos Galaxy”
Edition of 75
Size 22 x 35.5 inches / 55.8 x 90.1 cm
Fine art print on Signa Smooth 300gsm paper
Hand-signed and numbered by the artist
$350 plus shipping and handling

YOSUKE UENO
“Lily The Kit”

Edition of 50
Size 18 x 22.5 inches / 45.7 x 57.1 cm
Fine art print on Signa Smooth 300gsm paper
Hand-signed and numbered by the artist
$300 plus shipping and handling

YOSUKE UENO
“The Hapico Machina”
Edition of 50
Size 28 x 35.5 inches / 71.1 x 90.1 cm
Fine art print on Signa Smooth 300gsm paper
Hand-signed and numbered by the artist
$350 plus shipping and handling
Photographed and printed by Static Medium

All sales are final. International customers are responsible for any import fees (duties/taxes) due upon delivery.

Thank you.

Photo Tour of Evoca1’s ‘Sanctuary‘, Tran Nguyen’s ‘Remedy‘, and group exhibition #ThinkspaceHappyPlace

Thinkspace presents a photo tour through Evoca1’s ‘Sanctuary‘, Tran Nguyen’s ‘Remedy‘, and group exhibition #ThinkspaceHappyPlace

Video Tour and Opening Reception of EVOCA1’s ‘Sanctuary’, Tran Nguyen’s ‘Remedy’, and group exhibition #ThinkspaceHappyPlace

Opening reception of EVOCA1’s ‘Sanctuary’, Tran Nguyen’s ‘Remedy’, and group exhibition #ThinkspaceHappyPlace

On view until August 7, 2021 at Thinkspace Projects.

EVOCA1 (AKA ELIO MERCADO) – ‘Sanctuary

EXCERPT FROM EVOCA1 INTERVIEW

What is your most favorite and least favorite part of creating a mural? What is your most favorite and least favorite part of working in the studio?

My least favorite part of painting a mural is the prep work that goes on before I can actually start painting.  It could be from getting a concept approved to buffing the wall.

Once that process is done, then we can actually get into the paint, which is the best part. Seeing how the wall comes together and interacting with people in the street during the process is what makes it all worth it. In the studio, it’s pretty much the same. I really enjoy the creative process, but I struggle having to be indoors, confined to a space for long hours.

Full interview is available here

TRAN NGUYEN – ‘Remedy

EXCERPT FROM TRAN NGUYEN INTERVIEW

Do you have any rituals that help you tap into a creative flow? Are you still a night owl when it comes to working?

Coming up with ideas is probably the hardest step for me.  Sometimes, the best way to get the creative flow moving is to sit in my living room for a few hours without any music, noise or distractions.  If I sit long enough my mind will eventually get bored and wander off, which can slowly get that little hamster wheel churning.  I think this is what you call modern meditation?  And yes, I still hoot at night.

Full interview is available here

Interview with Evoca1 for ‘Sanctuary’ | July 17 – August 7 at Thinkspace Projects

Thinkspace Projects is thrilled to present Evoca1’s debut west coast solo show, ‘Sanctuary.

The exhibition marks a series that embodies Evoca1’s agenda to merge art and humanity into a single creation. With photorealistic works that have a delicate quality, he effortlessly conveys the nuances of human life, creating scenes of human life and emotion.

In anticipation of ‘Sanctuary,” our interview with Evoca1 discusses the inspiration behind the show, how he taps into creative flow, and where to grab lunch in Wynwood.

For those unfamiliar with your work, can you tell us a little about yourself and how you came to be familiar with Thinkspace?

I am a Dominican artist/muralist based out of South Florida. I am a figurative painter working mostly with oil indoors, and acrylic paint outdoors.  I’ve always had a love for creating. Growing up in the Dominican Republic on dirt roads, I was the neighborhood artist getting paid pesos for Batman commissions. I played baseball for most of my life and gave up the bat for a brush when I hurt my shoulder. I’ve been lucky enough to paint all over the world, and meet a lot of great people. I paint to express my thoughts and explore the world’s challenges. I met Andrew while I was painting a mural during PowWow Hawaii.  I participated in a group show and I’ve been happy to work with him on many projects since then.

What was the inspiration behind ‘Sanctuary’ and this latest body of work?

The initial concept for the show came up a few years back, after a conversation I had with my son who was 4 years old at the time.

After spending most of the time silent during dinner, he said to me “my friend is black”. He’d been friends with him since they were 2 years old and had never acknowledged his skin color. At first, we were furious and asked him who told him his friend was black and he replied “In school”. I always wondered at what age people start noticing skin color and the different ways it’s introduced.

From there I started thinking about how the world would be if the pandemic had wipeout all the adults and kids were left to inherit the earth.

So I imagined it would be a place where they wouldn’t be judged based on the color of your skin, social status, or religious belief.

So I thought it would be a great starting point for an exhibition.

What is your most favorite and least favorite part of creating a mural? What is your most favorite and least favorite part of working in the studio?

My least favorite part of painting a mural is the prep work that goes on before I can actually start painting.  It could be from getting a concept approved to buffing the wall.

Once that process is done, then we can actually get into the paint, which is the best part. Seeing how the wall comes together and interacting with people in the street during the process is what makes it all worth it. In the studio, it’s pretty much the same. I really enjoy the creative process, but I struggle having to be indoors, confined to a space for long hours.

Do you have any rituals that help you tap into a creative flow before getting to work?

Definitely, coffee and music, I found that I do best while spending long hours in solitude.

What were you listening to in the background while developing this exhibition?

It was a mix of a bunch of artists, but mainly Michael Kiwanuka, Woodkid, and some Fela Kuti on the days I wanted to pull a long night.

Have you had any mentors over the course of your artistic evolution? Who would you consider a mentor, and what did you learn from them?

I didn’t really have any mentors, most of my art knowledge has come from a lot of self-exploration. I’ve learned a lot from just studying masterworks and reading books.

I’ve been a huge fan of David Leffel, an American master painter, who has a huge library of demos and talks online. So I’ve studied a lot of his work and based my painting pallet on the one he uses.

What is one our your proudest accomplishments or something you’ve had the opportunity to experience because of your artwork that has really stuck with you?

Being able to put together a few art festivals back in the Dominican Republic has been my proudest moments. I’ve had the opportunity to host a lot of great artists from around the world and introduce the country to so many great works. In those early days, murals and street art weren’t being celebrated as in other countries, so being able to give that to those small towns we visited was really fulfilling.

If you were taking an art friend around Miami/South Florida for a day, what would you do/show them, and where would you go to eat? ALSO – Same question, but for back home in the Dominican Republic…?

In Miami would have to take them to Wynwood. I think Wynwood is one of those places you have to visit at least once. Then grab lunch and coffee at El Bajareque, a small Puerto Rican restaurant in the outskirts of Wynwood, they make a mean pan can bistec.

Río San Juan is a small beach town in the Dominican Republic, where my dad is from and we spent a lot of our childhood. This is the town where we started our Artesano mural project back in 2014. We’ll spend the day eating seafood and having a beer from a small shop on the beach sand. That’s a whole day event in itself.

What is on your mural location bucket list?

Don’t really have a bucket list mural, but would like to visit more Asian countries. I missed the chance to visit before due to conflicting schedules but looking forward to the experience.

Do you remember the first mural that you created? What did you paint, and where was the piece located?

The first large-scale mural I painted was “Running with Wolves” back in 2012. It was a 2 story high wall in Wynwood, depicting a man running from wolves while carrying a lamb. It was my first time painting anything on that scale, so it took me forever.