Marie-Claude Marquis Studio Tour in Preparation for “Don’t Use Me, I’m Broken’

Marie-Claude Marquis – Don’t Use Me, I’m Broken | July 25, 2020 – August 15, 2020

The inspiration behind the exhibition: In ‘Don’t use me, I’m broken’, I basically wanted to talk about the flaws, fails, and challenges, unique to each individual, that make us interesting and complex beings. But since this exhibition was mainly created during the pandemic, it took a darker turn than my usual work. Before this period, some of us had the opportunity to avoid facing problems, consciously or not, by loading our lives with work, obligations and activities. But because the recent confinement had a mirror effect on ourselves, it forced us to confront our darker facets and our relationship issues and I wanted to address that with the show. It will, therefore, be a mix of reflections, overflow, fears, hope, humor, and once again an attempt to encourage the spectator to express his feelings and to free himself from a weight that a person is often unconscious of carrying.

View available work here: https://shop.thinkspaceprojects.com/collections/dont-use-me-im-broken

About Thinkspace: Thinkspace was founded in 2005; now in LA’s Culver City Arts District, the gallery has garnered an international reputation as one of the most active and productive exponents of the New Contemporary Art Movement. Maintaining its founding commitment to the promotion and support of its artists, Thinkspace has steadily expanded its roster and diversified its projects, creating collaborative and institutional opportunities all over the world. Founded in the spirit of forging recognition for young, emerging, and lesser-known talents, the gallery is now home to artists from all over the world, ranging from the emerging, mid-career, and established.

 The New Contemporary Art Movement, not unlike its earlier 20th Century counterparts like Surrealism, Dada, or Fauvism, ultimately materialized in search of new forms, content, and expressions that cited rather than disavowed the individual and the social. The earliest incarnations of the Movement, refusing the paradigmatic disinterest of “Art” as an inaccessible garrison of ‘high culture’, championed figuration, surrealism, representation, pop culture, and the subcultural. By incorporating the ‘lowbrow,’ accessible, and even profane, an exciting and irreverent art movement grew in defiance of the mandated renunciations of “high” art. Emerging on the West Coast in the 90’s partly as a response to the rabid ‘conceptual-turn’ then championed on the East Coasts, the Movement steadily created its own platforms, publications, and spaces for the dissemination of its imagery and ideas.

 Video by Birdman

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