Virtual Tour of February 2022 Exhibitions

Thinkspace presents a virtual tour of “Intersections” featuring new work from Alvaro NaddeoManuel ZamudioSean Banister, and Gustavo Rimada. Along with Andrea Aragon’s “Somas Magicas” showing in Gallery Two, and new works from Marie Claude MarquisEshinlokun Wasiu, and Alex Face in our viewing room.

Virtual Tour: https://players.cupix.com/p/H0t97I9j

Virtual tour created by Birdman

Photo Tour of February 2022 Exhibitions

Thinkspace presents a photo tour of “Intersections” featuring new work from Alvaro Naddeo, Manuel Zamudio, Sean Banister, and Gustavo Rimada. Along with Andrea Aragon’s “Somas Magicas” showing in Gallery Two, and new works from Marie Claude Marquis, Eshinlokun Wasiu, and Alex Face in our viewing room.

Continue reading Photo Tour of February 2022 Exhibitions

Opening Reception of February 2022 Exhibitions

Thank you to all those who attended the opening reception of “Intersections” featuring new work from Alvaro Naddeo, Manuel Zamudio, Sean Banister, and Gustavo Rimada. Along with Andrea Aragon’s latest solo exhibition “Somas Magicas” showing in Gallery Two, and our Viewing Room showcasing new works from Marie-Claude Marquis, Eshinlokun Wasiu, and Alex Face.

All exhibitions are on view at Thinkspace Projects now through February 26th.

Continue reading Opening Reception of February 2022 Exhibitions

Interview with Gustavo Rimada for “Intersections” | Exhibition on view February 5 -February 26 at Thinkspace Projects

Thinkspace Projects is pleased to present Gustavo Rimada as part of our new group exhibition, “Intersections”. The exhibition is a solo show for each artist in their own right, and continues to build on their momentum into 2022. Each artist’s work is unified by storytelling, displaying an array of memories and experiences within the walls of the gallery.

Gustavo Rimada brings the perspective of his own ancestry to the show. This body of work is part of an on-going series from Rimada, which tells a story about how our ancestors connect with us. “Whether it’s celebrating Dia de los Muertos in my work or telling old folk stories about our ancestors returning to nature, my goal is to create a space where you can feel the connection and spirit between nature and the afterlife.” This series is heavily influenced by his culture, emphasizing the connection between humans and nature from the day they are born to the day they pass away. With these works, Rimada aims to translate that journey, aiding viewers in understanding.

In our interview with Gustavo Rimada he shares with us words of wisdom for a young artist, how Palm Springs and his culture has influenced his work, and what you can find him doing when not painting.

Can you share with us a little bit about your upbringing and where you are currently creating?

Hi yes, I was born in Mexico migrated to the US when I was 7 with my mother brother, and sisters. I grew up in Indio CA , after high school I moved to Fairbanks Alaska after joining the Army . It was there that I started to paint again after seeing Juxtapoz Mag & Hi-Fructose. About 12 years ago I decided to move back to the desert to start my art career, I’ve bounced around a Southern Cal from LA to San Diego and now once again I am in the Coachella Valley, Palm Springs to be exact, where I work in my home studio.

What was the inspiration behind this latest body of work? What themes have you been exploring in your work?

Like most of my work, I am heavily influenced by my culture the colors the patterns the beautiful landscape/ nature. This body of work is also inspired by my culture’s spirituality and folklore. Because I have spent the past 4 years in Palm Springs where modernism and simplicity is around me my work has taken a more cleaner / simpler theme.

Could you share what your day-to-day looks like when working in your studio?

We’ll I am a very routine artist my day-to-day after I wake up around noon or 1 pm is to decompress a bit for about an hour before driving to grab some coffee downtown PS. When I get home I try to grab a bite before starting, I paint on and off for about 4-5 hours until around 10 pm when my family heads to bed, and I paint up until 5 am while watching some of my favorite films/documentaries. Somewhere in between paint sessions, I like to go for a drive to just listen to music and focus on my tasks especially if I’m feeling a little bit of artist block. 

What’s in your “artistic toolbox”? Are you particular about brands that you use?

When I comes to paint yes I only paint with acrylics, the brand I only use is Liquitex Heavy Bodypaint. For brushes I don’t have a particular favorite I tend to beat up brushes fairly quickly so they all seem the same from the most expensive to the least expensive. However, Trekell brushes are really easy to acquire they are a small company too so I buy those a lot. I use Trekell panes as well but the best panels I can buy are sourced locally here in Cathedral City at Custom stretched canvas super high-quality stuff.

How do you like to unwind outside of the studio? Do you have a process for sourcing and/or keeping track of your inspiration?

Outside of the studio, I hit museums as much as possible but on a daily basis, I watch my favorite films, and like I said in one of the other questions I love to drive and listen to music especially certain songs really put me in a place that inspires me to create.

What was on your playlist while creating this new body of work?

I listen to a lot of different music but my go-to when working on more culturally themed paintings is music from artists like Vicente Fernandez, Natalia LaFourcade, Juan Gabriel, Selena etc… classic rock like Pink Floyd, Les Zepplin, pretty much any Rock in the 70s and of course hip hop I am a 90s kid so anything in that era is always on my playlist.

Most artists express themselves creatively as a child, but there is a moment when a shift occurs from just being creatively inclined to be more artistically minded – do you know when that moment was for you?

Yes, I remember being chosen to work on a huge banner in middle school for the local zoo the program was after school for kids who were artistic and I remember the people in charge were really impressed and encouraged me to continue that moment has always felt like the beginning for me, but my mom always talks about moments as a kid where she can see that art was in my future but what mother doesn’t say that lol.

Have you ever worked outside creating public murals? If not, would you be interested in pursuing one day?

I’ve done 3 murals only, two in a restaurant it took me way too long and another through Thinkspace for PowWow Antelope Valley and yes I enjoyed it very much, it was a short timeline so it was difficult for me since I paint really slow despite contrary belief. I would totally do it again it was such a great e pero and I learned a lot.

What words of wisdom would you share with your past self when you were just starting to create art? Is there anything in your artistic journey that you wish you may have done differently? 

I wish I would have taken things more seriously early on in my life whether it was high school or college. I wish I would have been more eager to learn about art history and different movements. Instead today, I find myself doing a lot of research which I love but being a better student is something I wish I was growing up. 

What did you find to be the biggest challenge of 2020 for you?

To be 100% honest I am such a homebody and because I am so fortunate to be able to work from home it really wasn’t much of a change. However, I do feel terrible for those whose businesses went under, and for those who have to follow protocols daily, I couldn’t wear that mask all day. My heart always goes out to the healthcare industry the doctors and nurses on the frontlines I have it infinitely easier than them and I am beyond grateful for their sacrifice and hard work during this never-ending pandemic.

What big projects do you have coming up in 2022 and 2023 that you’d like to share more about?

We’ll there’s one that I just wrapped up and that was doing the key art for one of my favorite series on Netflix Narcos Mexico. It was beyond amazing to see them using my art for marketing and even did a massive billboard in Times Square which I was lucky enough to go see in person with my wife and daughter. In 2022 I have the 4 person show with Thinkspace, after that, I am in a couple of group shows and late in 2022 I have a solo at Antler Gallery in Portland OR. There are a few commissions sprinkled in 2022 but once I am all done with that I want to finish a series of paintings that I have been postponing for years now it was originally supposed to be painted for Greg Escalante’s gallery in Chinatown but after his passing, I set it aside. I never seem to have the adequate time to finish it so unfortunately it keeps getting pushed back but the goal is to finally finish it. The series is based on Alice in Wonderland but with a Mexican twist.

Gustavo Rimada Artist Statement

This body of work is an ongoing series I am working on where I am telling a story about how our ancestors connect with us. Whether it’s celebrating Dia de los Muertos in my work or telling old folk stories about our ancestors returning in nature. My goal is to create a space where you can feel the connection & spirit between nature and the afterlife. It is a series that is heavily influenced by my culture, the tones are meant to create a space where the subject is the focus. We are all connected with nature from the time we are born to the day we pass and this is my way of translating that journey.

Coming up on February 5 at Thinkspace

Gallery One | SEAN BANISTER, ALVARO NADDEO, GUSTAVO RIMADA and MANUEL ZAMUDIO | Intersections
Gallery Two | ANDREA ARAGON | Somas Magicas
Viewing Room | MARIE CLAUDE MARQUIS | Thinking of You
Viewing Room | ESHINLOKUN WASIU | New Works
Viewing Room | ALEX FACE | New Works

On view February 5 – February 26, 2022

Opening Reception:
Saturday, February 5 from 5pm-9pm | artists will be in attendance
– Masks are required during your visit –

Thinkspace Projects is thrilled to present an all-new group exhibition and all-new solo show simultaneously, continuing their 2022 momentum. Each artist’s work is unified by storytelling, displaying an array of memories and experiences within the walls of the gallery.

In Gallery One, four artists join forces for Intersections, filling the space with complementary and contrasting works from Sean Banister, Alvaro Naddeo, Gustavo Rimada, and Manuel Zamudio. The exhibition is incredibly relevant, drawing on themes of time, identity, and blurring boundaries to explore true connection.

Southern California-based artist Sean Banister uses this show as an expansion and continuation of his work in 2020, delving into the identity of humans as storytellers and collectors. Having developed a strong interest in how the items we interact with and collect help us to craft our own self-narratives, Banister explores how this affects image and individuality, from the way one sees themself personally to the way they exist and are viewed in the world.  While each of his pieces for “Intersections” is unique, together they all act as facets of the same experience of living in our current time.

Alvaro Naddeo approaches Intersections with the desire to create work that mixes personal memories with the collective memories of our society. In pulling textures from the places Naddeo has personally been and incorporating them into greater social and political commentary, he is able to tell stories that may not have previously been told. He works to give space to the marginalized and the minorities, “those who can see and smell everything good that America has, but are never allowed to get there.”

Gustavo Rimada brings the perspective of his own ancestry to the show. This body of work is part of an on-going series from Rimada, which tells a story about how our ancestors connect with us. “Whether it’s celebrating Dia de los Muertos in my work or telling old folk stories about our ancestors returning to nature, my goal is to create a space where you can feel the connection and spirit between nature and the afterlife.” This series is heavily influenced by his culture, emphasizing the connection between humans and nature from the day they are born to the day they pass away. With these works, Rimada aims to translate that journey, aiding viewers in understanding.

Manuel Zamudio also brings the theme of life and death into his collection, focusing on the transition between them. He maintains the post-apocalyptic world that he had built with his previous solo show here at Thinkspace, but delves into architecture and urban landscape as a foundation for the exploration of the afterlife. With new-age ghost-inspired characters Zamudio explores the delicate line between life and death, which grows thinner every day. He highlights the fragile boundaries between body and soul, life and death, day and night, living in the transitions. 

In Gallery Two, Andrea Aragon fills the space with her latest solo show Somas Magicas. Aragon draws upon her own experiences and surrounding community to create breath-taking oil paintings that do not sugar coat the human experience. Aragon’s goal is to present an awareness and give a perspective of individuals whose story has yet to be fully told, reaching a broader audience than they might on their own. The artist hopes her works sheds light on how similar we are as inhabitants of this earth, and how we can benefit from just a little bit more understanding. With each piece, Aragon evokes compassion.

As an added bonus, in our viewing room we’re excited to showcase a small new collection of plates from longtime gallery favorite Marie Claude Marquis, alongside new works from recent Thinkspace Family new comers Eshinlokun Wasiu and Alex Face.

About Sean Banister
Sean Banister is a SoCal artist. Working as a high school teacher for the past 18 years, he has always been a passionate learner and works to bring that excitement for learning to the classroom. Banister is largely a self-taught artist, having pursued a degree in English and taken a just few very encouraging classes at the local community college to get back into drawing and painting after a long time away. In his work, Banister often chooses objects and their human counterparts to be the subject of his work, drawing out the relationships between them. Banister’s work draws out the narratives stored in the items in his paintings to reveal feelings we have about who we are and how we chose to exist.

About Alvaro Naddeo
Originally from São Paulo, Brazil, Naddeo has lived in Lima, New York City, and is currently based in Los Angeles. These urban environments shaped his memory and permeate most of his work. Naddeo’s father is an illustrator, and as a child he spent many hours drawing and watching him work. Constantly encouraged by his father, he was both inspired and intimidated. At 17, the intimidation got the best of him and he quit, choosing to pursue a career in advertising as an Art Director. This allowed him to exercise his interest in art, without requiring mastery with the pencil or brush. Twenty years later, while living in New York City he found himself inspired to once again pick up the brush. Now he is back to painting, this time Naddeo is not quitting.

About Gustavo Rimada
Born in Torreon, Mexico, Rimada and his family immigrated to California when he was seven years old. Raised in Indio, California, he began taking art classes at a young age and attended The Art Institute in Santa Monica California. After September 11th 2001, Rimada was inspired to join the Army, serving three years before returning to his true love, art. Rimada painted on any surface he could find, canvas, shoes, bags, etc, eventually finding the tattoo culture that inspired him to further pursue his passion for painting. When Rimada is not painting, he is a devoted father and family man.

About Manuel Zamudio
Zamudio is a painter, a muralist, and a storyteller. Born in Mexico City, Zamudio made his way to the talent-rich city of McAllen, Texas in 1992 at the age of 5. While dealing with the challenges that often come with assimilating to a starkly different culture at a very young age, Zamudio found refuge by immersing himself in art.  As a self-taught artist, he started perfecting his technique by replicating comic books, without knowing or understanding the human figure and the concepts of color schemes. As he grew older, he started taking an interest in the urban culture of South Texas, learning color schemes, perception, shadow, and so on from local graffiti artists. Now, Zamudio has taken his passion into a new path: storytelling.  He has displayed his artwork in numerous galleries and museums in the United States and Mexico.  His new line of work has been immensely inspired by great works of cinematography, street art, and post-apocalyptic sci-fi novels. His new work explores new methods of how to bring cinematography onto the canvas. Zamudio is a painter, a muralist, and a storyteller.

About Marie Claude Marquis

Excited to have a collection of 25 new insults on antique plates from Canada’s Marie Claude Marquis on view this February in our viewing room for her mini show Thinking of You.

MC Marquis is an artist whose practice is rather multidisciplinary. Touching both graphic design and visual arts, she is inspired by souvenirs, nostalgia, pop culture, Québec identity and her own emotions which she expresses with humor, a feminine touch and a colorful sensitivity.

In her gallery work, Marie-Claude has mastered the art of re-appropriation in giving found objects new meaning. That way she can give these objects a second life, prolong their existence and reduce her own environmental impact. Mainly by typographical interventions, she always finds a way to give new meanings to these antiques. The result of her work is often humorous, sometimes irreverent but always keeps a big focus on aesthetics

About Andrea Aragon
In Gallery Two, Andrea Aragon fills the space with her debut solo show Somas Magicas. As an artist and first-generation Mexican American, Andrea Aragon has chosen oil painting as an avenue to illustrate and shape the human experience within her community. She draws upon the community around her, the majority of which can be categorized as lower to lower middle-class America. Aragon uses her ongoing knowledge of political, cultural, and social understandings to entice a juxtaposed narrative that invites the viewer to tap into their self-consciousness, ultimately creating raw and relatable works.

About Esihinlokun Wasiu
Eshinlokun Wasiu (b. 1998, Lagos, Nigeria) is a full time surrealist artist who sees life’s challenges as a tool for creating his masterpieces. And has been prolific in producing works that speak about the society and its effect on the people around. Culture, identification and power of humanity are a few aspects of his current research and artistic practice.

Eshinlokun Wasiu studied Business Administration at Yaba College of Education, Nigeria. His interest in art, as well as his career began while he was a kid with the support of his mother. Inspired by issues relating to him and those who are around him, he began creating works that reflect the everyday struggles of people, with the hopes of making a change in people life and way of thinking. He exercises himself by using of charcoal and acrylic paints to create silhouette that seem to have been in bond and value.

Eshinlokun is reintroducing the “ Surrealism “ movement in a way the world will appreciate in a different form. His also part of the title deed art collective curated by Ken Nwadiogbu 2019/2020. Also had a residency at AAF ( African Artists’ Foundation ) in the year 2020

Eshinlokun Wasiu is constantly revitalizing his practice by challenging modes of Black representation. His oeuvres do not just encompass various forms of drawing using acrylic and charcoal, but most recently transcends into photography, sculpture, installation and performance art.

About Alex Face
Patcharapol Tangruen (aka Alex Face / b. 1981) is a well-known and influential graffiti artist in Thailand. Alex studied architecture at Bangkok’s King Mongktut Institute of Technology and earned a Bachelor’s Degree in the Department of Fine and Applied Arts. An interest in architecture led Alex Face to explore and wander the streets and back alleys of Bangkok for abandoned buildings, sites that he eventually used as a canvas to develop his street art.

Using Alex Face as his alter ego, the artist attempts to create a link with the urban population, the underprivileged of Bangkok and the surrounding provinces. His iconic character showcases the adventures of a disillusioned child in a baby rabbit costume who looks wise beyond his years, at first glance appearing cute, but all the time worrying about the future of our world.

About Thinkspace                               
Thinkspace was founded in 2005; now in LA’s thriving West Adams District, the gallery has garnered an international reputation as one of the most active and productive exponents of the New Contemporary Art Movement. Maintaining its founding commitment to the promotion and support of its artists, Thinkspace has steadily expanded its roster and diversified its projects, creating collaborative and institutional opportunities all over the world. Founded in the spirit of forging recognition for young, emerging, and lesser-known talents, the gallery is now home to artists from all over the world, ranging from the emerging, mid-career, and established.

Though the New Contemporary Art Movement has remained largely unacknowledged by the vetted institutions of the fine art world and its arbiters of ‘high culture,’ the future promises a shift. The Movement’s formative aversion to the establishment is also waning in the wake of its increased visibility, institutional presence, and widespread popularity. Thinkspace has sought to champion and promote the unique breadth of the Movement, creating new opportunities for the presentation of its artists and work. An active advocate for what is now one of the longest extant organized art movements in history, Thinkspace is an established voice for its continued growth and evolution, proving their commitment by expanding its projects beyond Los Angeles, exhibiting with partner galleries and organizations in Berlin, Hong Kong, London, New York City, Detroit, Chicago, and Honolulu among many others, participating in International Art Fairs, and curating New Contemporary content for Museums. Committed to the vision, risk, and exceptional gifts of its artists, the gallery is first and foremost a family. From the streets to the museums, and from the “margins” to the white cube, Thinkspace is re-envisioning what it means to be “institutional.”