Inside the Studio of Evoca1 for ‘Sanctuary’

Inside the studio of Evoca1 while he prepares for his exhibition ‘Sanctuary’ showing at Thinkspace Projects from July 17 – August 7th.

What was the inspiration behind ‘Sanctuary’ and this latest body of work?

“The initial concept for the show came up a few years back, after a conversation I had with my son who was 4 years old at the time.

After spending most of the time silent during dinner, he said to me “my friend is black”. He’d been friends with him since they were 2 years old and had never acknowledged his skin color. At first, we were furious and asked him who told him his friend was black and he replied “In school”. I always wondered at what age people start noticing skin color and the different ways it’s introduced.

From there I started thinking about how the world would be if the pandemic had wipeout all the adults and kids were left to inherit the earth. –“

Read our full interview with Evoca1 here.

Video by Birdman

Inside the studio of artist Tran Nguyen

Inside the studio of Tran Nguyen while she prepares for her exhibition ‘Remedy’ showing at Thinkspace Projects from July 17 – August 7th.

What’s the inspiration behind ‘Remedy’ and this latest body of work?

 I often go through color phases through my work.  Previously, the dominant color in my paintings have been blue, purple, sepia, etc., but for the longest time, I’ve avoided a green palette.  I love organic floral patterns and the overall botanical aesthetic, and decided this show would be the perfect opportunity to illustrate the theme and color.  This led to building the narrative for “Remedy” and its world — a world inhabited by fantastical characters that are both part-human and part-nature.

Read our full interview with Tran Nguyen here.

Video by Birdman

Inside the Studio of Jack Shure for upcoming exhibition ‘Soul Sanitizer’

Inside the studio of Jack Shure for ‘Soul Sanitizer

What is the inspiration behind this latest body of work? What themes or techniques were you exploring?

The inspiration behind these works spawned from the creative influences of my youth. I wanted to revisit themes and nuances of the things that drove me to paint in the first place all while creating a personal narrative around the characters and symbols.

Read the full interview with Jack Shure here.

Video by Birdman Photography

Inside Giorgiko’s studio as they prepare for “What Is (and what is not)”

Inside the studio of artist duo Giorgiko while they prepare for their exhibition “What Is (and what is not)” showing at Thinkspace Projects from April 3, 2021 – April 24, 2021

“What Is (and what is not)” draws on experiences of the last year and the word itself. A weighted word, just hearing “apocalypse” conjures imagery, imagery that Giorgiko has drawn on and specified creating a series that is hauntingly beautiful and relevant. The etymological root of the word “apocalypse” is the Greek word “apokálypsis”, which means “an unveiling or unfolding of things not previously known and which could not be known apart from the unveiling”. The husband and wife duo incorporates this definition, revealing truths about our world while maintaining a sense of whimsy.

Video by Birdman

Inside the studio of Fumi Nakamura as she prepares for ‘Look Toward the Future, but Not So Far As To Miss Today’

Inside the studio of Fumi Nakamura while she prepares for ‘Look Toward the Future, but Not So Far As To Miss Today’

March 6, 2021 – March 27, 2021

Thinkspace Projects is pleased to present this new solo exhibition from artist Fumi Nakamura. ‘Look Towards the Future, But Not So Far As To Miss Today’ is a new body of work depicting flora and fauna. Each element is carefully selected to represent elements of life, memory, body and soul. Nakamura pulls from the subconscious, using metaphor and imagery to create striking pieces.

Fumi Nakamura draws inspiration from the Japanese phrase meaning “language of flower.” In line with this concept, each flower has different meanings right down to the positioning. Colors play a huge role as well, and each work becomes full of phrases and meanings. One tulip can mean a variety of things from “compassion” to “confession of love” to the “lost love” of a white tulip.

Different from her previous work in which she frequently incorporated negative space, this new series is filled up to the edges. Using custom “coffin” or “container” imagery, Nakamura takes inspiration from the funeral ceremony where we last see and connect with another being physically and reflect on the past together. This collection of works is layered and complex both in visuals and meaning

Video by Birdman