Video Tour & Opening Reception Party of ‘NEXUS IV: RAIZ’ Group Show, alongside solo exhibitions from Anthony Clarkson, Ken Flewellyn, Matthew Grabelsky, Anthony Hurd, and Cody Jimenez at The Brand Library & Art Center

Opening night of ‘RAIZ’ at the Brand Library & Art Center in Glendale, California this past Saturday. What a night! One for the books, to say the very least. Well over 1,500 art loving Angelinos flowed through the halls of the prestigious institution over the course of the evening.

Many, many thanks to all of the exhibiting artists, the live painters and artisan vendors, the incredible food booths, our incredible bartender team, all the staff and security at the Brand, and all of you that came out to share your love and support. It was a MAGICAL evening and we didn’t want it to end.

Exhibitions on view through March 17 at:
The Brand Library and Art Center
1601 W. Mountain Street
Glendale, California 91201

Viewing Days / Hours:
Tues. – Thurs.: 11am – 8pm
Fri. & Sat.: 10am – 5pm
Closed Sun. & Mon.
Free Admission & Free Parking

‘RAIZ’ group show featuring new work from:
Antonio J. Ainscough
Fajar Amali
Michael Bardales
Brek
Ezra Brown
Karla Ekatherine Canseco
Rene Casamalhuapa
Young-Ji Cha
Sara Chakmakian
Leo Eguiarte
Sofia Enriquez
Isaac Escoto
Ha Haeng-Eun
FEMS
Priscilla S. Flores
Genavee Gomez
Melissa Govea
Fabian Guerrero
Daniela Garcia Hamilton
Chuy Hartman
Emiliana Herniquez
Armani Howard
Carlos Jaramillo
Haylie Jimenez
Sydnie Jimenez
Kai
Jolene Lai
Andrew Lopez
Selena Lozano
Steve Martinez
Jay McKay
Gibran Mendoza
Aryana Minai
Vanessa Morata
Kristy Moreno
Mr. B Baby
Baby Mueller
Guillaume Ollivier
Chaz Outing
Jerry Peña
Perez Bros
Pinche Kid
Lily Ramirez
Marissa Reyes
Gustavo Rimada
Euan Roberts
Roja
Esperanza Rosas
Conrad Ruiz
Javier Hache Ruiz
Tamara Santibañez
Fandi Angga Saputra
Mia Scarpa
Aof Smith
Melly Trochez
Ever Velasquez
Jacqueline Valenzuela
Daisy Velasco
Manuel Zamudio
Zeye Oner

ALONGSIDE SOLO EXHIBITIONS FROM:
Anthony Clarkson ‘Enigmatic Dreams’
Ken Flewellyn ‘Remix’
Matthew Grabelsky ‘Riders’
Anthony Hurd ‘Verified’
Cody Jimenez ‘Efferverence’

SITE-SPECIFIC MURALS FROM:
Brek | Love Yo Dreams | Mr. B Baby

Live Painting:
Goopmassta
Alison Bamcat
Angel Once

OUTSIDE IN THE PARKING LOT AREA:

Car Clubs:
Cabrones Car Club | Ghetto Car Club | Bikes On The Blvd

Food:
Zavalas Pies | Sweet Life LA | Bad Jimmys

DJ action courtesy of GOLDNBROWN and a cash bar on site featuring mixed drinks and Peroni Beer

Video Projections courtesy of Digital Debris Video Gallery

Photos & Video by Birdman.

Opening Reception of March 2022 Exhibitions

 
Thank you to all those who attended the opening reception of Victoria Cassinova’s ‘Without Ornament’ and Langston Allston’s ‘Blue City’. Along with Young Ji-Cha’s ‘Seesaw’ showing in Gallery Two, and new works from Willem Jacques Hoeffnagel, and Miah the Creator (aka Jamiah Calvin) in our viewing room.

We welcome you to come in and see these wonderful exhibitions now on view through March 26th.
Continue reading Opening Reception of March 2022 Exhibitions

Photo Tour of March 2022 Exhibitions

 Thinkspace presents a photo tour of Victoria Cassinova’s ‘Without Ornament‘ and Langston Allston’s ‘Blue City‘. Along with Young-Ji Cha’s ‘Seesaw‘ showing in Gallery Two, and new works from Willem Jacques Hoeffnagel, and Jamiah Calvin (aka Miah the Creator) in our viewing room.

Continue reading Photo Tour of March 2022 Exhibitions

Interview with Young-Ji Cha for “Seesaw” | Exhibition on view March 5 – March 26 at Thinkspace Projects

Thinkspace Projects is thrilled to present Young-Ji Cha’s debut solo show, “Seesaw.”

For “Seesaw”, Cha presents paintings that focus on various characters which often are juxtaposed against a thin line between reality and fantasy. Although the themes are seemingly whimsical in nature, they showcase underlying tropes of morality, life, and death. Cha takes her work to the next level, having often experimented with these creatures in the past, and taking this opportunity to unify them in a collection that deals in extremes.

In our interview with Young-Ji Cha she shares how mother’s cooking reflects a blending of cultures, creating a surreal environment to express familiar emotions, and who inspires her creativity.  

Can you share with us a little bit about your upbringing, and where you are currently working on your art?

I was born and raised in South Korea and had a very normal upbringing by working parents. I was usually the first one home after school and I remember often doodling and painting at home until my mom got off work.  Looking back now I think that’s what got me naturally liking art. Currently, I am working and making art in Los Angeles. 

What was the inspiration behind this latest body of work? What themes have you been exploring in your work?

I wanted to tell stories of ups and downs I experienced using characters and elements that are familiar to me. I experimented with low-key and high-key palettes as well as different mask designs to illustrate my ideas in a more surreal way. 

Which pieces in this body of work were most challenging? 

Each piece had its own challenging aspects, but the low-key paintings were the most challenging to finish off for this body of work. I think finding a good balance of charm with my characters along with setting them in a darker palette is always difficult to accomplish. 

Could you share what your day-to-day looks like when working in your studio? Do you have any rituals that help you tap into a creative flow? 

I start my day with a good cup of coffee. I’m a big coffee addict and can’t function properly without coffee in my system. In the morning I work in the animation field and in the evening I work on my paintings. 

How old were you when you moved from South Korea to the states? What are elements of your cultural identity or traditions that you think is really cool and interesting? 

I was 10 when my family and I moved to the states. My cultural identity and traditions are definitely mixed between Korean and American elements. One of the coolest things that I see in my family is how my mom’s traditional cooking has adapted utilizing US ingredients. I think her Korean food recipes are a perfect way to describe how culturally mixed my family is now and how I’m influenced by it. 

What is your favorite part of the creative process? What is the most difficult part? 

The brainstorming process is the best. Just doodling and coming up with ideas and then researching for references. I think the most difficult part is toward finishing up a painting. When it’s time to make the finishing touches and call it done is always tough for me.

Who inspires you as an artist?

My mom was a preschool teacher in Korea and watching her draw decorations and cartoons for her class was very inspiring. Not only was she very talented but she made it look really easy.

What did you find to be the biggest challenge of 2020 for you?

Off the top of my head, I can’t think of one, but it was definitely a trying year for everyone.

What is your proudest accomplishment of 2021? Life thus far? (can be art-related or not)

The proudest accomplishment of 2021 would be starting my first body of work. It was something I really wanted to do for a long time and I’m happy I can finally cross it off of my list and get things rolling.

What big projects do you have coming up in 2022 and 2023 that you’d like to share more about?

On March 5th, 2022, my first body of work “Seesaw” will debut through Thinkspace Gallery as well as an unannounced group show later this year. I’m so excited to show there and share new works with everyone

Young-Ji Cha
Seesaw (Gallery II)

Opening Reception with the Artist(s):
Saturday, March 5, 2022
6:00-10:00pm

Young-Ji Cha exhibition “Seesaw” showing at Thinkspace Projects | March 5, 2022 – March 26, 2022

Thinkspace Projects is thrilled to present Young-Ji Cha’s debut solo show, ‘Seesaw.’ This collection is Cha’s first-ever complete body of work, uniting various subjects in a cohesive set of works.

In this exhibition, Cha presents paintings that focus on various characters which often are juxtaposed against a thin line between reality and fantasy. Although the themes are seemingly whimsical in nature, they showcase underlying tropes of morality, life, and death. Cha takes her work to the next level, having often experimented with these creatures in the past, and taking this opportunity to unify them in a collection that deals in extremes.

Seesaw’ was inspired by Cha’s personal highs and lows throughout everyday life. Using themes from traditional Korean motifs and lore to stage her characters, she crafts surreal moments that are utterly engaging.

“I wanted to tell stories of ups and downs I experienced using characters and elements that are familiar to me. I experimented with low key and high key palettes as well as different mask designs to illustrate my ideas in a more surreal way.”

In doing so, Cha creates scenes that invite imagination from the viewers, leaving the “why” and “where” open to interpretation.

About Young-Ji Cha
Young-Ji Cha was born in Seoul, Korea, and currently works in Los Angeles, California. She started her training in classical fine arts and later in illustration. Her recent works are inspired by traditional folktales and various forms of animation. Besides freelance illustration and gallery art, Young-Ji Cha also works with various studios within the animation industry as a visual development artist.